Posts Tagged young Douglass

Funeral Services for Honorable Devin, Old Anacostia Douglassonian (Fri., August 23, 2019; viewing 10-11am / services 11am – 12 noon @ Historic Allen Chapel African Methodist Episcopal Church, 2498 Alabama Avenue SE, Washington, D.C. 20020)

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Honorable Devin is an Old Anacostia Douglassonian in life and afterlife.

While he protected, guarded and honored the history of his community during his life we have an additional responsibility henceforth in uplifting the history to do so with honor and respect for his name and memory and contributions to his community.

It is with bowed head and clasped hands we take a knee and pray on the corners for the memory of Honorable Devin and all Old Anacostia Douglassonians who have joined the Lord’s Army of Guardian Angels to watch and guard the living.

With the sincerest sympathies and deepest of heartfelt courtesies we send our condolences and love to Honorable Devin’s family, friends, loved ones and community of Old Anacostia.

The historicity of Allen Chapel AME Church, known as the “Cathedral of Southeast,” cannot be expressed in language.

Prior to the American Civil War a community of free peoples of African descent in the area of Good Hope Hill received blessing from the Baltimore Conference of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, the first independent religious denomination founded by peoples of African descent in America, to establish Allen Chapel.

Before the American Civil War Allen Chapel AME has been a sanctuary for the community.

President Obama visited and attended services at the Cathedral of Southeast while serving as President of the United States of America.

The loss and void felt in our hearts is eternal as is the history Honorable Devin contributed to his community and our knowing his history will remain forever.

JM

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Frederick Bailey walking tours … St. Michaels Museum at St. Mary’s Square presents historic walking tours

Dr. Dodson House in St. Michaels

Dr. Dodson House in St. Michaels

ST. MICHAELS — During its 2014 May to October season, St. Michaels Museum at St. Mary’s Square will continue to offer docent-led historic walking tours every Saturday at 10 a.m. beginning May 3.

The major tour, “Historic St. Michaels: its People, Places and Happenings,” will be offered on the first three Saturdays of each month. This tour will give highlights of St. Michaels during the 19th century, chronicling the rise and fall of the shipbuilding industry, the War of 1812 and battles of St Michaels, and the rise of the seafood industry. These stories will be told by viewing many restored structures from that era and describing life of famous and typical residents of these times, including Frederick Douglas. On the fourth Saturday, the museum’s signature tour, “Frederick Douglass, a slave, in St. Michaels 1833-36,” will give a more detailed view of the early life of St. Michaels’ most famous 19th century resident.

These Saturday tours last about 90 minutes and are available for $10 for adults and $5 for children ages 6 to 17, with the fee including both the tour and museum entry fee. Detailed schedules can be found on the museum’s website, www.stmichaelsmuseum.org. Email stmichaelsmuseum@atlanticbb.net for reservations and information. Subject to docent availability, either of these tours can be offered at other times for groups of five or more. Email stmichaelsmuseum@atlanticbb.net or call 410-745-0530 for information on schedules or special group rates.

The new “Historic St. Michaels: its People, Places and Happenings” tour will begin at the museum where a diorama highlights the British attacks on St. Michaels on Aug. 10 and 24, 1813, and the impact of these battles on the St. Michaels community. This will be followed by a walk through St. Mary’s Square to Muskrat Park and then on to Navy Point. Along the way, participants will see many original and restored houses from the 1800s while learning about life in a small waterfront village and the vibrant shipbuilding and seafood industries of that era. Featured are colorful stories of many of the people and events. Highlights include the history of the layout of St. Michaels by James Braddock, the cannon involved in the battle of St. Michaels and the Cannonball House that was struck by a cannon ball that rolled down the interior stairs and frightened a woman holding her baby.

At Muskrat Park, visitors will learn of the transition of Church Cove to Muskrat Green and see replicas of the cannons from 1813. Continuing down Locust Street, they will come to “Hells Crossing,” and at the foot of Carpenter Street is the Higgins Boatyard, the oldest continuously operated boat yard in town and one of several in operation in 1812. Then comes the Dodson House site of Frederick Douglass’ 1877 return to reconcile with his former master. Following on to Navy Point, visitors get a view of St. Michaels Harbor and will hear how Honeymoon Bridge was named, how the seafood industry developed on Navy Point and more about 19th century activities in the harbor.

On the “Frederick Douglass, a slave, in St. Michaels” tour, participants can follow in the footsteps of Frederick Douglass during his teenage years in St. Michaels. Arriving as Frederick Bailey, 15, in 1833 and leaving in 1836 determined to acquire his freedom, his years in St. Michaels were critical in the development of this great man.This tour will offer an historical perspective of Douglass’ life in enslavement and his return to reconcile with his former master.

For more information, call Chip Britt 410-745-0530.

 

Source:

The Star Democrat

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WYE HOUSE ARCHEOLOGY EXHIBITION OPENS AT ACADEMY ART MUSEUM ON AUGUST 24

Read about the exhibit in the Star-Democrat HERE

WYE HOUSE ARCHEOLOGY EXHIBITION OPENS AT ACADEMY ART MUSEUM ON AUGUST 24

 

Wye House Exhibit in Easton, MD. Photo by Chris Polk

Wye House Exhibit in Easton, MD. Photo by Chris Polk

Curator-Led Tours: 
Friday, September 6, 12 noon
Wednesday, September 25, 12 noon

Wye House is one of the most important and well documented plantations in Maryland. Joint Heritage at Wye House is a major interpretive exhibition shown at the Academy Art Museum, drawing on archaeological evidence from the slave quarters and from the Green House (later called the Orangery) at Wye House. The archaeological exhibition, on display at the Academy Art Museum in Easton, MD, from August 24 to October 13, 2013, contains archival sources, household objects, books, recipe collections, maps, and artwork related to the people who lived and worked at Wye House. Organized by Anke Van Wagenberg, Museum Curator, and visiting curators Mark P. Leone, Elizabeth F. Pruitt, Benjamin A. Skolnik, and Amanda Tang from the Department of Anthropology, University of Maryland College Park, Joint Heritage at Wye House explores the co-existing cultures and their creations at the plantation in the 18th and 19th centuries.

The archaeology of Wye House involves eight years of excavations on slave quarters, slave industries, and buildings associated with the shipping of agricultural goods that made the plantation wealthy. The Lloyd family, founders and owners of Wye House, owned a large numbers of slaves. The young slave Frederick Douglass (1818 – 1895) was among the people who lived and worked at Wye House. The exhibition concentrates, not on the evils of slavery, but rather on the culture made by Africans and African Americans on the property, including the combined work of the Lloyds and their enslaved Africans.

One section of the exhibition includes the history of Wye House, its structures, and people, including books on architecture. A second section focuses on excavation methods, materials excavated, and interpretations of the objects. A third section interprets the Green House (later called the Orangery) and its archaeological data and meaning, derived from pollen grains, food remains, and thousands of broken dishes. The Green House interpretation explores farming, domesticating new plants, and a native pharmacopeia. The population of Wye House section introduces the lives of the Lloyd family, enslaved Africans, and the free people who worked with them after the Emancipation Proclamation, and includes a searchable database drawn from previously unavailable lists of slaves, including hundreds of full names. The ability to fully identify the historical individuals who lived and worked the plantation is a rare and remarkable feature of the exhibition. In a related vein, historical family cookbooks will trace the introduction of local ingredients and the influence of African-American cooks in the emergence of southern cuisine.

On September 26, 2013 at 6 p.m., the Academy Art Museum in Easton, MD, will present a lecture in its Kittredge-Wilson Speaker Series entitled, “The Archaeology of Time Telling at Wye House for Black and White Production: Floral Clocks, Time and the Greenhouse” by Professor Mark P. Leone and Elizabeth F. Pruitt, Department of Anthropology, University of Maryland, College Park. Pollen grains found in the rooms of the greenhouse at Wye show an array of over 100 plants used for food, medicine, and household chores. This lecture sees the greenhouse not as a decoration, not as an isolated building, but as the pivot around which the woods, bogs, fields, and gardens at Wye were made to predict time, like a clock. In addition to food and medicine, the array of flowers and leafy plants in the greenhouse and in the surrounding formal garden could have been used to tell the time of day similar to the manner of a floral clock. The whole purpose of a floral clock at Wye House would be to have an independent measure of time beyond the factory bell that sent slaves to the field and the overseers’ commands that kept people there on the owner’s clock.

The exhibition is made possible by the generous support of Richard and Beverly Tilghman, the University of Maryland, College Park and the Frederick Douglass Honor Society. Additional support was provided by The Historical Society of Talbot County and The Maryland Historical Society, who generously loaned materials, as well as Patrick Rogan for exhibition design. The exhibition is made possible by funding from the Maryland State Arts Council and Talbot County Arts Council. This project was also made possible by a grant from the Maryland Humanities Council, through support from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, or conclusions expressed in this exhibition do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities or the Maryland Humanities Council.

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Frederick Douglass comes to your local PBS station tonight in Part 1 of “The Abolitionists” [January 8, 2013]

Although, Frederick Douglass was written out of Stephen Spielberg’s “Lincoln” Douglass cannot be written out of history altogether. Tonight the American Experience premiers “The Abolitionists, Part 1 (1820 – 1838).”  The 3 part series will air throughout January. Douglass makes his appearance in Part 2 (1838 – 1854).

WETA’s schedule here.

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Frederick Douglass’ days as a preacher “among the happiest days of my life”

Metropolitan AME Church, 1518 M Street NW

HON. FREDERICK DOUGLASS

My connection with the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church began in 1838. This was soon after my escape from slavery and my arrival in New Bedford. Before leaving Maryland I was a member of the Methodist Church in Dallas Street, Baltimore, and should have joined a branch of that Church in New Bedford, Mass., had I not discovered the spirit of prejudice and the unholy connection of that Church with slavery. Hence I joined a little branch of Zion, of which Rev. William Serrington was the minister. I found him a man of deep piety, and of high intelligence. His character attracted me, and I received from him much excellent advice and brotherly sympathy. When he was removed to another station Bishop Rush sent us a very different man, in the person of Rev. Peter Ross, a man of high character, but of very little education. After him came Rev. Thomas James. I was deeply interested not only in these ministers, but also in Revs. Jehill Beman, Dempsy Kennedy, John P. Thompson, and Leven Smith, all of whom visited and preached in the little schoolhouse on Second Street, New Bedford, while I resided there. My acquaintance with Bishop Rush was also formed while I was in New Bedford.

It is impossible for me to tell how far my connection with these devoted men influenced my career. As early as 1839 I obtained a license from the Quarterly Conference as a local preacher, and often occupied the pulpit by request of the preacher in charge. No doubt that the exercise of my gifts in this vocation, and my association with the excellent men to whom I have referred, helped to prepare me for the wider sphere of usefulness which I have since occupied. It was from this Zion church that I went forth to the work of delivering my brethren from bondage, and this new vocation, which separated me from New Bedford and finally so enlarged my views of duty, separated me also from the calling of a local preacher. My connection with the little church continued long after I was in the antislavery field. I look back to the days I spent in little Zion, New Bedford, in the several capacities of sexton, steward, class leader, clerk, and local preacher, as among the happiest days of my life.

SOURCE:

One Hundred Years of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church; or, The Centennial of African Methodism, by James Walker Hood, 1895 (Documenting the American South, UNC Chapel Hill)

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