Posts Tagged walking tours

Thank you to Washington, D.C. History & Culture’s Robert Kelleman for continued support

Robert Kelleman, with hat, on lower Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue in SE Washington. Speaking is Ward 8 Advisory Neighborhood Commissioner Robin McKinney.

This past Saturday, January 16, 2021 Lost History Associates partnered with Robert Kelleman’s juggernaut community group Washington, D.C. History and Culture to present “Frederick Douglass and the Underground Railroad“. 

More than 700 participants joined the virtual presentation precipitating an encore presentation on the same subject matter for February 14, 2021.

We wanted to give a special thanks to our friend Robert for the continued collaboration and partnership. Look forward to seeing you soon whether online or in-person. 

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WYPR (88.1 FM) “On The Record” -> Who Was Frederick (Bailey) Douglass, The Man? [December 4, 2020]

To make sense of history we often turn to books to help illustrate life in the past. But today we talk with someone who brings history alive by taking it to the streets — of Baltimore.

Historian and author John Muller gives us a preview of his walking tour: The Lost History of Frederick (Bailey) Douglass.

He believes the well-worn stories of the abolitionist’s loftier accomplishments don’t portray the true scope of the man he was.

LISTEN HERE

http://player.audiostaq.com/ontherecord/who_was_frederi

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Walking Tour: Frederick Douglass in Annapolis (February 15, 2020 – 8:15am @ Annapolis City Dock)

FD in Annapolis


Before offering dedicatory remarks at historic Mt. Moriah A.M.E. Church in Annapolis in the mid-1870s, the Honorable Frederick Douglass first witnessed the Maryland State House punctuating the capital city’s skyline as the adolescent enslaved Frederick Bailey on his way to Baltimore from the Eastern Shore.

Upon entering the State House generations later Douglass recited the farewell address Gen. George Washington had delivered nearly a century before, in 1783, upon resigning his military commission to the Confederation Congress in Annapolis.

Learn the lost and unknown history of Frederick Douglass and Maryland’s governors, leaders of the African Methodist Episcopal Church from Bishop Wayman to Bishop Tanner who impacted the state capital before, during and after the Civil War to students from Annapolis who attended Howard University, where Douglass served the board of trustees, to graduates of the Unites States Naval Academy who saw Douglass off to Haiti where he served the United States State Department.

Tour will be led by the foremost international scholar on the connections, associations, relationships and lost history of Dr. Frederick (Bailey) Douglass in the state of Maryland from Frostburg in Western Maryland’s Allegany County to Salisbury on the Lower Shore’s Wicomico County.


Invitations will be respectfully extended to Maryland Governor Larry Hogan, Maryland Lt. Governor Boyd Rutherford, Maryland delegation to the United States Senate and Unites States House of Representatives, every delegate of the Maryland General Assembly, every member of the State Senate, director and staff of the Banneker-Douglass Museum, mayor of Annapolis and city council, as well as directors and staff of several state and county agencies supported by the public treasury to communicate, preserve and promote local history and tourism.

Tour Stars:

Annapolis City Dock

Tour Ends:

Maryland State House


TICKETS HERE ! 

$15General Admission

$10Midshipmen, veterans, law enforcement 


 

** Special Note: Tour on February 15, 2020 will precede the public unveiling of statues of Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass inside the State House. A full program of events will occur in and around Annapolis from 10:00 AM – 3:00 PM.

More information: msa.maryland.gov/msa/homepage/html/upcomingevents.html

The walking tour has been organized independently due the urgency and necessity to return the community history of Frederick Douglass to the community of Annapolis and communities across the state.


JohnMuller HeadShot-300x300 (1)

John Muller, author of Frederick Douglass in Washington, D.C.: The Lion of Anacostia (2012) and Mark Twain in Washington, D.C.: The Adventures of a Capital Correspondent (2013) is currently at work on a book about the lost history of Frederick Douglass on Maryland’s Eastern Shore.

Muller has presented widely throughout the DC-Baltimore metropolitan area at venues including the Library of Congress, Newseum, Politics and Prose, American Library in Paris and local universities. As well, in the past two years he has presented on the “Lost History” of Frederick Douglass in Baltimore, Cambridge, Centreville, Cumberland, Denton, Easton, Frederick, Frostburg, Hagerstown, Salisbury, St. Michaels and other local cities and towns throughout the state of Maryland.

Muller has been featured on C-SPAN’s BookTV and C-SPAN’s American History TV, as well as in the pages of the Star Democrat and the airwaves of WDVM (Hagerstown) NBC4 (Washington), WPFW, WAMU, WYPR and Delmarva Public Radio.

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Walking Tour: Women Activists of Cedar Hill (Sat., February 15, 2020 @ 11:30 AM)

Flyer - Fortune & Douglass _ draft (12)Learn and discuss the lost local and international history of the reformist women activists of Cedar Hill in the fields of education, arts, journalism, business and politics that worked alongside Frederick Douglass across generations & geography.

Meet the poets, actresses, musicians, principals, lawyers, seamstresses, journalists and women reformists, including the Honorable Miss Gladys Parham, who have inhabited the sacred space of Cedar Hill from the years of Frederick Douglass to the decades of preservation activism which secured the home and grounds as a flagship of the National Park Service.

Learn about women from the Eastern Shore to Paris to around the corner who have made contributions to the residual history of Cedar Hill and the neighborhood of Old Anacostia.

Questions and photography are encouraged throughout the walking tour!


SIGN UP HERE !! 

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“Frederick Douglass on the Eastern Shore and Cecil County” @ Cecil College – Career & Community Education, Sat., March 7, 2020

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This course explores the local history of Frederick Douglass through the Delmarva Peninsula with special emphasis on Cecil County, Maryland.

Class will offer an introduction to the biography of Frederick Douglass, one of the foremost leaders in the American Abolitionist Movement during the Civil War and Reconstruction periods of the 19th century. Discussions include the extensive travels and visits of Douglass throughout the Delmarva from Salisbury in Wicomico County to Centreville in Queen Anne’s County to Rising Sun in Cecil County.

Topics include consequential visits, connections and influences, religious communities, political and educational leaders, local history, slavery, American
Abolitionist Movement, African American communities in the 19th century, and
development of the transportation infrastructure in Cecil County.

Notes:
Lecture will be held from 9am – 1pm.
Lunch in Port Deposit from 1:30 – 2:30pm.
Followed by walking tour of Port Deposit.

Students must be physically able to do walking tour for full two hours


Instructor: Muller
1 session, 6.5 hours
$69 persons under 60. $25 MD residents
over 60 (GZH620). $5 Senior Network
Members (SZH620).
Sec# Day Dates Times Location
01D S 3/7 9-1p PE E221
01D* S 3/7 2:30-4:30p Offsite
*01D – Tour of Port Deposit


Spring 2020 Course Schedule: PDF

https://www.cecil.edu/programs-courses/career-community-education/lifelong-learning

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Upcoming Walking Tours – Frederick Douglass & Howard University; Capitol Hill; Frederick City; Old Anacostia & Barry Farm churches [December 2019]

John Muller _ walking tour (3)Upcoming walking tours being led throughout Washington, D.C. and the state of Maryland for the month of November 2019.

Most tours offer *FREE* tickets for local public and college students,

For more information and/or group rates text 202.236.3413.


Frederick Douglass and Howard University

* Saturday, December 7, 2019 — 8:30 AM *

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Frederick Douglass Murals in Old Anacostia

 * Sunday, December 8, 2019 — 10:00 AM *

* Saturday, December 21, 2019 — 11:30 AM *

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Frederick Douglass in Frederick City

*Saturday, December 14, 2019 — 8:30 AM & 4: 15 PM –*

Local Author Showcase – C. Burr Artz Library – Frederick City 

*Saturday, December 14, 2019 — 11:00 AM – 4:00 PM*

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Frederick Douglass in Capitol Hill

 *Friday, December 20, 2019 @ 5:00 PM –*

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Churches of Frederick Douglass in Old Anacostia and Barry Farm

*Saturday, December 21, 2019 @ 9:30 AM–*

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Upcoming Walking Tours – Frederick Douglass & Howard University; Capitol Hill; Baltimore; Frederick City; Westminster [November 2019]

John Muller _ walking tour (3)

Tour of Old Anacostia, Washington, D.C.

Upcoming walking tours being led throughout Washington, D.C. and the state of Maryland for the month of November 2019.

 

Most tours offer *FREE* tickets for local public and college students,

For more information and/or group rates text 202.236.3413.

 


Frederick Douglass and Howard University — * Friday, November 1, 2019 — 6:00 PM *

Frederick Douglass in Westminster — * Monday, November 4, 2019 — 6:00 PM *

Frederick Douglass in Frederick City — *Saturday, November 9, 2019 — 10:00 AM –*

Frederick Douglass in Capitol Hill —  *Saturday, November 16, 2019 @ 9:00 AM–*

Frederick (Bailey) Douglass in Baltimore —  *Sunday, November 17, 2019 @ 9:30 AM–*

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“Frederick Douglass walking tour highlights the history of Baltimore,” (Johns Hopkins News-Letter, September 12, 2019)

Frederick Douglass walking tour highlights the history of Baltimore

By EMILY MCDONALD | September 12, 2019  


John Muller, a local historian and author, organized and led a walking tour titled “The Lost History of Frederick (Bailey) Douglass in Baltimore, 1824-1895” on Friday. The tour departed from the Frederick Douglass-Isaac Myers Maritime Park, and highlighted various locations in Fell’s Point that Douglass frequented during his time in Baltimore.

The tour’s emphasis on Baltimore’s history and Douglass’ relationship to the city helped attract students. Junior Bonnie Jin said that she participated in the tour because she was curious about the history of Baltimore.“I was really interested in Baltimore history, and I felt like I needed to learn more, especially about African American history, which is oftentimes overlooked,” she said. “It’s interesting to compare the history of Baltimore with the history of Boston, which is where I’m from, especially in regards to the abolition movement.”

The tour first stopped on Thames Street. Muller explained that Frederick Douglass first came to Baltimore when he was around eight or nine years old, enslaved to former Maryland Governor Hugh Auld.[*]

Muller began by describing Douglass as a child. He explained that Douglass was the playmate of Auld’s son, Thomas Auld, and as a result, spent a lot of time with a gang of Irish kids called the Fell’s Point Boys.

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Photo by Honorable William Alston-El.

“Douglass is a very sophisticated person. He was the friend of the governor’s son, but he also could run the streets,” Muller said. “In the movie Glory, he’s portrayed as very stoic and stiff. Frederick Douglass was not stoic and stiff. He’s a very easygoing free-flowing person.”

Muller then pointed out 28 Thames St., where Nathaniel Knight, a bookseller, sold Douglass the first book he ever owned, a copy of The Columbian Orator.

At the time, Knight was a justice of the peace in Maryland, a role in the state judiciary.

Muller explained the risk that Douglass took when buying the book.

“Douglass buys [The Columbian Orator], which at that time, of course, is an illegal action,” he said. “This means that when Douglass is buying this book, the person he’s buying it from is trusted, confirmed by the senate of Annapolis, to enforce the various laws [of a justice of the peace].”

The tour then turned onto Bond Street. Muller shared another anecdote from Douglass’ life, explaining that in the 1830s, financial instability in Baltimore led to tensions between Irish and free black and enslaved workers. Muller said that Frederick Douglass was assaulted by a white dock worker, and Hugh Auld sought redress in court, going to see a lawyer on Bond Street. But the law at the time did not allow Frederick Douglass, an enslaved person, to speak in court, and did not allow anyone of African descent to bear witness.

Next, the group stopped on Dallas Street, formerly known as Strawberry Alley. When he was still enslaved to Hugh Auld, Frederick Douglass worshiped at a Methodist church on Strawberry Alley, Muller pointed out.

“When Methodism is formed as a religious denomination in America in 1784, one of the stipulations is that you cannot be a member in good standing in the Methodist church if you own slaves,” he said. “[Douglass] attended services here [on Dallas Street] at Strawberry Alley Methodist Church.”

In 1892, Douglass bought property on Strawberry Alley. He reopened the church, which had since closed, and built five homes. Muller noted that throughout his lifetime, Douglass invested in various other properties.

“He never attended a single day of formal school in his life, yet he had an in-depth, complex understanding of economics. He was an investor in real estate in Rochester, [Washington, D.C. and] Baltimore,” Muller said.

He elaborated on the benefit that Douglass’ purchase of the properties on Strawberry Alley had on the Baltimore community.

“When Douglass is building these homes, they are going to be open to all nationalities, with potentially a preference for blacksmiths, carpenters, educators from this community… Just like today, Baltimore has housing issues. Frederick Douglass didn’t just stand on the sidelines. He put his money where his mouth was and opened these properties,” Muller said. “Frederick Douglass gave back to his community.”

Vrshank Ravi, class of 2019, said that he was particularly interested in Muller’s stories about Douglass’ involvement in real estate.

Image may contain: 12 people, people smiling, people standing, sky and outdoorMuller added that Frederick Douglass taught night school on Dallas Street, and explained that he was very involved in the Baltimore school system. “I was like, ‘how did that work back then?’ Especially because Baltimore and real estate, and the whole history of redlining and more modern problems,” he said. “I do a lot of work on urban economics and that really stood out to me.”

“In Baltimore, Frederick Douglass advocated one, that black children should be taught by black teachers, and two, that black teachers should receive equal pay,” he said.

Towards the end of the tour, Muller discussed Douglass’ political views.

“Frederick Douglass was very much a committed Republican, and it’s very important to understand the context of political patronage and how he used his connections within the system to help out African Americans, which, historians have not really told that story,” he said.

Muller clarified that Douglass was still an ardent abolitionist, who believed that political agitation was necessary to create change.

To illustrate his point, Muller told the story of Douglass once publicly refusing to shake hands with Baltimore Chief of Police and former Confederate Cavalry Officer Harry S. Gilmor.

“Frederick Douglass has that visceral vision, that prophesy. He understands that political agitation is the one way to make change,” he said. “He does not serve in the Civil War, but he essentially served in the abolitionist war.”

Like Jin, Ravi also appreciated the fact that Muller focused on aspects of Douglass’ life which are often overlooked by historians.

“There’s a lot of stories that aren’t told or are told wrong, and getting original research is really difficult,” he said. “It made me wish I took more history at Hopkins.”

Jin also said that she appreciated the situated context of the tour, since they walked around the locations of importance.

“We were walking along the same place that so many historical things were happening,” she said. “Him telling the story, added on with the fact that we were walking through, it made it really vivid for me.”


Lion of Anacostia Editor’s Note:

I left the article in tact, as it appears online, but there are one or two corrections.

* Such as, before arriving in Baltimore to the Hugh Auld household Frederick Bailey had been a playmate of Daniel Lloyd, the youngest son of former Governor and United States Senator Edward Lloyd V.


 

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The tour concluded at Greedy Reads in Fell’s Point, Baltimore. Photo by Honorable William Alston-El.

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Upcoming DC & Maryland Frederick Douglass-themed events; September 2019

Friday, August 30, 2019 @ 8pm
Saturday, September 1, 2019 @ 9:15 AM
Friday, September 6, 2019 @ 6:00 PM
Saturday, September 7, 2019 @ 2:00 PM & 4:00 PM
Friday, September 20, 2019 – 6:30 PM in Cambridge, Maryland
Dorchester County Historical Society
Saturday, September 21, 2019 – 9:00 AM @ Long Wharf Park
Saturday, September 21, 2019 – 2:00 PM
Dr. Charles H. Chipman Cultural Center
Friday, September 27, 2019 @ 5:30 PM
Meet outside Library of Congress @ 1st & Independence Avenue
Old Anacostia Douglassonians are local, regional, national and international.

 

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Independence Day July 4th Walking Tours of Frederick Douglass’ Old Anacostia (9:00 AM / 2:00 PM)

John Muller _ walking tour (3)Developed in the mid-19th century as one of the District’s first suburbs, Anacostia and its residents played a key role in shaping the city we know today. A walking tour led by historian and author John Muller traces its history and significance with a focus on the man that came to be known as the “Lion of Anacostia,” Fredrick Douglass, who lived in the neighborhood from 1877 until his death in 1895.

Blending historic research and contemporary neighborhood affairs and news, our guide will lead the group on a walk through time, exploring one of Washington City’s most misunderstood and sacred communities. Stories of presidents, local personalities, famed resident Frederick Douglass, 19th-century architecture and neighborhood folklore will be woven throughout.

** TICKETS ** 

Questions and photography are encouraged throughout the walking tour!


John Muller, author of Frederick Douglass in Washington, D.C.: The Lion of Anacostia (2012) and Mark Twain in Washington, D.C.: The Adventures of a Capital Correspondent (2013) has been a local reporter in Old Anacostia and adjacent communities for the past decade for a variety of print and online publications

Muller has presented widely throughout the DC-Baltimore metropolitan area at venues including the Library of Congress, Newseum, Politics and Prose, American Library in Paris and local universities. He is currently working on a book about the lost history of Frederick Douglass on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. He has presented “The Lost History of Frederick Douglass in Western Maryland” at various venues such as the Washington County Central Library in Hagerstown, Ebenezer AME Church (Hagerstown) and Frostburg State University as well as presenting the “Lost History: Frederick (Bailey) Douglass in Baltimore” at the Enoch Pratt Central Library in Baltimore City. Muller has been featured on C-SPAN’s BookTV and C-SPAN’s American History TV, as well as in the pages of the Star Democrat and the airwaves of WDVM (Hagerstown) NBC4 (Washington), WPFW, WAMU, WYPR and Delmarva Pubic Radio.


This is a private walking tour of the Anacostia neighborhood conducted by an authorized local historian.

Meet at the visitor’s center of the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site

** TICKETS ** 

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