Posts Tagged W Street Douglassonians

Congratulations to “Frederick Douglass in Washington, D.C.: The Lion of Anacostia” cited 8 times in 2019 Pulitzer Prize Winner in History

William Alston-El - Frederick Douglass wheat paste on lower MLK

The late Honorable William Alston-El is featured in Frederick Douglass in Washington, D.C.: The Lion of Anacostia, cited 8 times by 2019 Pulitzer Prize Winner in History. 

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For a distinguished and appropriately documented book on the history of the United States, Fifteen thousand dollars ($15,000).

Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom, by David W. Blight (Simon & Schuster)

WINNING WORK


 

Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom

By David W. Blight

The definitive, dramatic biography of the most important African American of the nineteenth century: Frederick Douglass, the escaped slave who became the greatest orator of his day and one of the leading abolitionists and writers of the era.

As a young man Frederick Douglass (1818–1895) escaped from slavery in Baltimore, Maryland. He was fortunate to have been taught to read by his slave owner mistress, and he would go on to become one of the major literary figures of his time. He wrote three versions of his autobiography over the course of his lifetime and published his own newspaper. His very existence gave the lie to slave owners: with dignity and great intelligence he bore witness to the brutality of slavery.

Initially mentored by William Lloyd Garrison, Douglass spoke widely, often to large crowds, using his own story to condemn slavery. He broke with Garrison to become a political abolitionist, a Republican, and eventually a Lincoln supporter. By the Civil War and during Reconstruction, Douglass became the most famed and widely travelled orator in the nation. He denounced the premature end of Reconstruction and the emerging Jim Crow era. In his unique and eloquent voice, written and spoken, Douglass was a fierce critic of the United States as well as a radical patriot. He sometimes argued politically with younger African Americans, but he never forsook either the Republican Party or the cause of black civil and political rights.

In this remarkable biography, David Blight has drawn on new information held in a private collection that few other historian have consulted, as well as recently discovered issues of Douglass’s newspapers. Blight tells the fascinating story of Douglass’s two marriages and his complex extended family. Douglass was not only an astonishing man of words, but a thinker steeped in Biblical story and theology. There has not been a major biography of Douglass in a quarter century. David Blight’s Frederick Douglass affords this important American the distinguished biography he deserves.

— from the publisher


FINALISTS

Nominated as finalists in History in 2019:

Civilizing Torture: An American Tradition, by W. Fitzhugh Brundage (Belknap Press of Harvard University Press)

American Eden: David Hosack, Botany, and Medicine in the Garden of the Early Republic, by Victoria Johnson (Liveright/W.W. Norton)

Annette Gordon-Reed* (Chair)

Charles Warren Professor of American Legal History; Professor of History, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University

Tiya Miles

Professor of History and Radcliffe Alumnae Professor, Harvard University

Marcus Rediker

Distinguished Professor of History, University of Pittsburgh

 

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Happy Holidays from 16th & W Street Douglassonians

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Frederick Douglass and Robert Todd Lincoln reportedly “favored by colored republicans of Washington” for revolutionary Presidential ticket in 1888 election

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Photo and research by William Alston-El. Copyright and trademark strictly enforced.

In preparation for my upcoming presentation on “Frederick Douglass and the Lincoln Family” in memory of Mr. John Elliff and Honorable William Alston-El I took my research to 16th & W Street SE for consultation.

Quiet as kept, in historical discussions and debates with W Street Douglassonians sacred and lost history of Dr. Douglass, respected as an omnipresent spirit and presence on Old Ana corners mural or not, is shared with me.

I have been entrusted by members of the community to share with the world the localized neighborhood history of Dr. Douglass that has been closely guarded and protected from the outside world for more than a century. Respect has to be earned in Old Anacostia.

“Uncle Fred and Uncle Abe’s son were friends,” a W Street Douglassonian told me.

“Yep. Chatter of them making a run for President and Vice President. That’s the untold and unknown history we live with, the underground history, knowing we’ve had to fight for everything we’ve ever earned in a country that said in the founding document we were 3/5 of a human. That is our history. Frederick Douglass is also our history. We don’t know Fred and we need to. Fred did everything he could to uplift us as a people. We tell you so you can tell them.”


Man respect man.

I have respected and admired the Lincoln Group of the District of Columbia for many years now.

With all due respect for the invitation and honor of addressing the Lincoln Group on October 16th I had to bring forth street historian scholarship from 16th & W Street SE.

As my friend from W Street shared, in the late 1880s there was speculation of a Republican presidential ticket of Dr. Frederick (Bailey) Douglass and Secretary Robert Todd Lincoln.

Without further editorializing — and explanation of my research techniques to the disgraceful “White Man Lies” and “White Woman Lies” collective of David Blight, Leigh Fought, Adam Goodheart, John Stauffer, Kate Larson and others — I provide scholarship emanating from the Master Educators holding street corners in Old Anacostia.

JM


Southern standard., October 01, 1887, Page 5 _ cropped

Washington Letter. [1]

WASHINGTON, Sept. 27, 1887.

….

While all is so quiet in politics – this being an off year – it may startle if it does not awe your readers, that a new Presidential ticket and a wonderful combination it is, too, linking as it does two of the great names of the nation, has been launched here in the Capital.

And well may President Cleveland, as he realizes the strength of this “combine” quake in his boots, as he sees his vision of a second term vanish into thin air, for how does he dare to oppose the Presidential aspirations of those men of renown, those eminent statesmen who will favorably compare with the fathers of the Republic – Lincoln and Douglass!

Yes, I repeat it, Robert Lincoln and Frederick Douglass.

The glorious deed was done at a banquet given to Douglass, the intellectual giant of the negro race, on the anniversary of emancipation day, and though, by a strange coincidence, Robert, the son of his father, happened to be in this city at the same time, I do not know that he is committed to the movement, yet his presence here on such an occasion may be significant.


InkedBurlington weekly free press., September 30, 1887, p. 2 __ Douglass and Lincoln ticket_ cropped _ red inkThe “Washington Letter” containing the above anecdote was syndicated in newspapers throughout the South as far as Texas.

In some papers the news item was condensed and boiled down to the base alloy of the possibility of what would have been at the time the most revolutionary presidential ticket in American history.

[2] “Robert Lincoln and Fred Douglass is the presidential ticket favored by colored republicans of Washington.”


SOURCE:

[1] “Washington Letter” [September 27, 1887], Southern Standard (Tennessee), October 1, 1887, page 5.

[2] “PERSONAL AND POLITICAL.” Burlington Weekly Free Press (Vermont), September 30, 1887, page 2.

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The National Park Service Invites You to a Book Discussion on “If I Survive” (Thurs, Sept. 6, 2018, 7pm – 9pm)

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Join us on Thursday at 7pm, as historians and authors Celeste-Marie Bernier and Andrew Taylor are on-hand to discuss their book, “If I Survive: Frederick Douglass and Family in the Walter O. Evans Collection” published by Edinburgh University Press.

The book is a collection of 60 previously unpublished speeches, letters and autobiographies, in addition to over 20 photographs and prints (many unseen) of Frederick Douglass and his sons from the Walter O. Evans Collection. This is the first extensive study of the great abolitionist and his family’s fight for the cause of liberty during the Civil War and in the Post-Emancipation era, as well as the first scholarly annotated transcriptions of these previously unpublished materials.

We hope you can join us for this Book Discussion featuring authors Bernier and Taylor!

Copies of the book will also be available for purchase in the site bookstore. #Douglass200

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Douglass Bicentennial Book Discussion: “If I Survive” Thur., September 6 at 7 PM – 9 PM @ Frederick Douglass National Historic Site [1411 W Street SE]

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The National Park Service is still in the midst of its yearlong bicentennial birthday commemoration of Frederick Douglass. Many books, articles, and journals have been written on Douglass—the leading African American abolitionist, orator, and statesman of the nineteenth century. Historians and authors Celeste-Marie Bernier and Andrew Taylor have penned one of the newest books on Douglass entitled, “If I Survive: Frederick Douglass and Family in the Walter O. Evans Collection” published by Edinburgh University Press.

The book is a collection of 60 previously unpublished speeches, letters and autobiographies, in addition to over 20 photographs and prints (many unseen) of Frederick Douglass and his sons from the Walter O. Evans Collection. This is the first extensive study of the great abolitionist and his family’s fight for the cause of liberty during the Civil War and in the Post-Emancipation era, as well as the first scholarly annotated transcriptions of these previously unpublished materials.

We hope you can join us for this Book Discussion featuring authors Bernier and Taylor!

Copies of the book will also be available for purchase in the site bookstore.


This is the most important book in Douglassoniana Studies published in generations.

Peace Islam to my dear friend William Alston El.
He would be tickled.

The most important work of Douglassonian Studies published in the Bicentennial year of Frederick Douglass National Historic Site is published by our dear friend — our European friend — Prof. Bernie.

I carry it how I carry it because that is how I was taught to carry it.

We must recognize and acknowledge the importance of uplifting the truth of Dr. Frederick (Bailey) Douglass and his yet untold story.

It is an American story that spans the Caribbean nations and across three continents.

All these folks have it twisted and tangled.
Therefore whereas there is opportunity for yung scholars to rise up out of their communities and tell the untold story.

But there are no scholars. Just those running game.

This is no game.
This is not speculative anti-history.

This is annotated Douglassonian Studies.
Family letters, biographies, photos, etc.

Family First
The Douglasses can speak for themselves.

And if Americans have to have a European scholar enlighten us to the ignorance of our history then so be it.

How do you think we got Donald Trump?

Come through W Street.

Learn how to uplift fallen history that is long overdue for this country and empower yourself to take ownership of your own history.

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New Bench at Frederick Douglass National Historic Site adds subtle touch to celebration of July 4th

new bench - long view walking towards back of grounds - 7.1.2018

A sacred bench was recently installed on the grounds of the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site, 1411 W Street SE, by Nature Sacred.

Days before the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site opened to the public for the Capitol Fireworks, and W Street SE Fireworks Show, for the first time in a generation, local horticulturalist Ron Ammon from Annapolis-based Nature Sacred devoted special attention to an overlooked small park on Cedar Hill’s sacred grounds.

new bench alongside old bench - FDNHS - 7.1.2018

New Bench (left). Old Bench, in a couple parts (right).

Years ago Open Spaces Sacred Places, now Nature Sacred, installed two benches in a gardened recreation space behind the parking lot. The rear bench, in an area shaded by extending foliage, had unfortunately weathered and succumbed to termites in recent years.

With an official heat index over 100 degrees Ron unloaded materials and tools from his white pick-up truck and got to work assembling a new sacred bench for the landscape of the Douglass family home.

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Ron Ammon of Nature Sacred alongside new bench at FDNHS.

In quick time Ron hauled and disposed of the old bench in the adjacent woods and moved the new bench into place. I accepted his invitation to take it on its first test-drive.

Ron also cut back dead branches of the nationally stricken Ash Tree, inspected the small foot bridge and generally cleaned up the park area.

Ron Ammon sitting on new bench w Journal of drawing of him - FDNHS - 7.1.2018

Ron Ammon alongside sketch of him by young artist.

A young artist visiting the Douglass home with her parents completed a sketch of Ron, a true W Street Douglassonian Naturalist, to show her appreciation for his industrious spirit.

We thank Ron, Nature Sacred and the TFK Foundation for the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site and all Douglassonian Naturalists from W Street SE and all parts of the world that visit the sacred grounds.

EDITOR’s Note:

W Street Douglassonians and local activists have been familiar with this organization for many years, including the installation of benches in Market Square nearly a decade ago.

A wonderful organization that helps communities heals from the outside by promoting nature’s impact and importance to everyday life.

 

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GoFundMe: Frederick Douglass Mural Exhibit planned for fall 2018 premier at The Charles Sumner School Museum & Archives in downtown Washington City

Fred Douglass wheat past on lower Martin Luther King Jr Ave SE

Wheat paste of Frederick Douglass on lower Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue SE. Photo by William Alston-El & John Muller.

From September 20, 2018 until October 13, 2018 an exhibit of Frederick Douglass public art murals in Washington, D.C., Baltimore and Rochester will be on display and review at The Charles Sumner School Museum and Archives at 17th & M Streets in downtown Washington, D.C.

Public programming will accompany the exhibit highlighting presentations on Frederick Douglass in Washington, D.C., murals throughout the world and the importance of visual representation and photography to Frederick Douglass, the most photographed American of the 19th Century.

Sponsors will be thanked by name in public program and other materials.

Donations will cover costs associated with:

1) Printing high resolution photographs of murals
2) Framing photographs
3) exhibit installation — explanatory text for each mural
printing promotional materials – flyers, postcards, local advertisements and street team
4) honorariums for panel participants
5) costs of special commemorative edition of The Narrative of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave for youth ages 8 – 18
6) incidentals — materials, equipment, etc.

Community Picture Day _ Spread Southside Love _ March 2018

Community Picture Day, 16th & W Street SE. “Spread Southside Love” by Rebeka Ryvola

** Thank you to everyone who contributed to the Frederick Douglass Community Conference in December 2017 and to “Spread Southside Love” mural in February 2018.

Thank you for your continued support of the Frederick Douglass Bicentennial.**

DONATE HERE! 

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