Posts Tagged The Hill

Maryland Commission on African American History & Culture -> Public Meeting, Mon., June 3, 2019 @ 11 AM (Asbury United Methodist Church, “The Hill,” Old Easton, Talbot County, Maryland)

Governor
Larry Hogan

Lt. Governor
Boyd K. Rutherford

Maryland Commission on African American History & Culture

Chair
Dale Glenwood Green

Vice Chair
Tamara England Wilson

Director
Chanel Compton


Notice of Annual Meeting

Historic Asbury United Methodist Church
The Hill Community  (1788)
18 South Higgins Street
Easton, Maryland 21601


Monday, June 3, 2019
11 a.m.

Questions?

Please contact us by
phone (410) 216-6181 or by
email MCAAHC@gmail.com

The Maryland Commission on African American History and Culture (MCAAHC) is committed to discovering, documenting, preserving, collecting, and promoting Maryland’s African American heritage. The Commission also provides technical assistance to institutions and groups with similar objectives. Through the accomplishment of this mission, the MCAAHC seeks to educate Maryland citizens and its visitors about the significance and impact of the African American experience in Maryland. The MCAAHC is a unit of the Governor’s Office of Community Initiatives.

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Maryland Commission on African American History & Culture

C/O Banneker-Douglass Museum
84 Franklin Street
Annapolis, MD 21401

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VIDEO: “Carlisle’s Chesapeake,” interviews Hon. Tarence Bailey (US Army, Ret.), great nephew of Frederick Douglass, about great uncle and ancestral heritage in Eastern Shore of Maryland’s Talbot County

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The Hill Community Project [Sat., July 7, 2:15pm @ Easton Branch of Talbot County Free Library]

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For more information on this project led by University of Maryland Professor Mark Leone please see the below links.

People of Wye House

Frederick Douglass and Wye House: Archaeology and African American Culture in Maryland

In Easton, archaeologists hope to uncover earliest free African-American settlement,” Baltimore Sun, July 25, 2013

 

 

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Tarence Bailey, Grahams Alley Douglassonian of Easton, Maryland, connects with W Street Douglassonians of Old Anacostia

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Tarence Bailey, an original Grahams Alley Douglassonian from Easton, Maryland in Talbot County, Maryland, native soul of the ancestral African Bailey Tribe.

On Sunday, March 18, 2018 in the year of the Frederick Douglass Bicentennial Mr. Tarence Bailey (US Army, Ret.), whose grandfather (5x) Perry Bailey was the older brother of Dr. Frederick (Bailey) Douglass and who passed in 1880 on Cedar Hill, walked the streets of Old Anacostia to connect with local inhabitants and indigenous Douglassonians.

It is not any man, or woman, person or group who can hold the time and attention of young men on the corners by chopping up the math and science of American and African history.

Mr. Bailey shared some of his experiences growing up in Easton in the 1980s and early 1990s when the area was faced with similar challenges that face Anacostia, as well as a tour he took of the Wye Plantation where ancestors of his Tribe are buried in an unmarked mass slave grave that has been maintained for longer than this country has existed. History is not something in a history book or biography to Mr. Bailey.

No firm plans were yet made to unite the two villages but it is known among tribal leaders of Old Ana the Eastern Shore mutually respects and welcomes W Street Douglassonians for a visit across the Bay to the native soil that birthed the Sage of Anacostia and America’s Pharaoh, Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey.

Mr. Bailey shared some of the differences and similarities of Old Easton and Old Anacostia. His authority and ability to speak on history was respected and openly received. The history of the Bailey Tribe is the history of this country. The history of Mr. (Bailey) Douglass on Jefferson Street is the history of Old Ana. The history of Old Ana is the history of DC. The history of DC is the history of this country.

Young men at 16th & U and some of the older-younger guys at 16th & V spoke with Mr. Bailey and expressed mutual respect and admiration for the unique and sacred Douglassonian legacy the two communities have a shared responsibility to uphold and protect.

For the purposes of local lore and the year of the Bicentennial of Frederick Douglass’ Birth it was a historic and important day for the neighborhood of Old Anacostia to host Mr. Bailey.

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