Posts Tagged statues

Washington Informer: “More Than Statues Needed to Honor Frederick Douglass” (February 4, 2021; John Muller & Justin McNeil)

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“Moving forward there is an incredible opportunity to mobilize existing networks, communities and institutions to finally tell a more complete story of Frederick Douglass, the man and not the myth.”

— Read full op-ed HERE! —

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Video: “Rhetoric Just Like Frederick” from Baba Got BARS, vol IV


credits from Baba Got BARS vol IV, released December 31, 2018

Written, produced, performed, recorded, mixed and mastered by Bomani Armah.

Video shot and directed by Dia Hancock

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Statement by Rochester Mayor Lovely A. Warren Regarding Douglass Statue Vandalism and Theft [December 17, 2018]

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Statement by Mayor Lovely A. Warren Regarding Douglass Statue Vandalism and Theft

“The vandalism and theft of the Frederick Douglass statue on Tracy Street is a sad event that demonstrates remarkable disrespect for the citizens of Rochester, especially those who have worked so hard to celebrate the legacy of Douglass during the 200th anniversary of his birth. I am grateful to the citizens who reported this incident as it unfolded and for the immediate response of the RPD, which resulted in a successful arrest. I have also spoken with Dr. Gerard Rooney, President of St. John Fisher College, who shares our community’s contempt for this type of behavior. We should all use this opportunity to consider the wisdom and continued relevance in Douglass’s own words when he said: “The soul that is within me, no man can degrade.”

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Democrat & Chronicle: “Two charged with trying to steal Frederick Douglass statue” [December 16, 2018]

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Courtesy Deva Jackson, Facebook.

Two charged with trying to steal Frederick Douglass statue

One of 13 statues of Frederick Douglass erected to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the historic icon’s birth was damaged during an attempted robbery early Sunday morning, Rochester police said.

John R. Boedicker, 20, of Endicott, and Charles J. Milks, 21, of Kenmore, have both been charged with fourth-degree criminal mischief, a misdemeanor, Rochester Police Investigator Jackie Shuman said.

Officers responded to reports at 12:13 a.m. at 1 Tracy St., site of a seminary where Douglass enrolled his eldest daughter, Rosetta, only to withdraw her after finding she was being placed in segregated classes.

The six-foot seven-inch statues by Rochester artist Olivia Kim are made out of cast epoxy resin and weigh 40 pounds and were placed on sites of significance to Douglass’ years in Rochester. It was installed earlier this year.

Those statues were a part of a project called “Re-Energizing the Legacy of Frederick Douglass,” and in a statement issued Sunday, the project’s leaders Carvin Eison, Bleu Cease and Christine Christopher expressed their disappointment in the vandalism.

“People around the area are devastated to learn the news of the attempted theft and severe damage to the statue of Frederick Douglass last night,” the three said in the statement. “We wish that we could write this off as an immature act of vandalism, but sadly, the witness to the theft reports that hateful racial epithets were used by those responsible. We find that incredibly sad.”

The trio urged community members to see the vandalism as an opportunity to teach others about Douglass’ legacy rather than be angry about the damage. They also said the statue will be replaced as quickly as possible.

“On behalf of the entire Frederick Douglass Bicentennial Committee, we want to say thanks to the witness who quickly called the police,” they said in the statement. “Thanks to the Rochester Police Department for their quick response, and to all those who have reached out with words of support.”

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Video: Frederick Douglass Square at the University of Maryland – College Park

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Huffington Post DC: Notes on Frederick Douglass’ Long Journey to the U.S. Capitol

Before the Frederick Douglass statue at One Judiciary Square moves to the US Capitol he takes time to read a new book about his life and times in Anacostia. Photo_ John MullerOn February 23, 1895, three days after Frederick Douglass died in his Anacostia home and two days before his funeral was held at the Metropolitan African Methodist Episcopal Church, just blocks from the White House, Richard F. Pettigrew from South Dakota rose on the Senate Floor to offer a resolution for immediate consideration.

“If it is to be passed at all it must be passed now,” Pettigrew said.

The resolution read, “Whereas in the person of the late Frederick Douglass death has borne away one of our most illustrious fellow-citizens, who served his country long, faithfully, and honorably as citizen, diplomat and statesmen: Therefore, Be it resolved, That out of respect to his memory his remains be permitted to lie in state in the rotunda of the National Capitol between the hours of 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. on to-morrow.”

Arthur Poe Gorman, a senator from Douglass’ native Maryland, was not interested. “Let the resolution go over,” he said.

Read the entire article HERE!

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Norton’s Long-Fought Effort to Bring D.C.’s Frederick Douglass Statue to the Capitol Ends in Victory

Before the Frederick Douglass statue at One Judiciary Square moves to the US Capitol he takes time to read a new book about his life and times in Anacostia. Photo_ John MullerFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                       

May 21, 2013

Norton’s Long-Fought Effort to Bring D.C.’s Frederick Douglass Statue to the Capitol Ends in Victory

WASHINGTON, DC – The House today passed a resolution (S.Con.Res.16) authorizing the use of Emancipation Hall next month,Wednesday, June 19, 2013, to unveil the District of Columbia’s Frederick Douglass statue.  The resolution, which passed the Senate last week, was approved in the House by a voice vote and does not need to be signed into law to take effect, marking the final step in the long-fought effort of Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC) to allow the District, like the states, to have its own statue in the Capitol.  During House consideration of the resolution today, Norton spoke and thanked the Republican leadership and Representative Candice Miller (R-MI), chair of the Committee on House Administration, for her help in bringing the resolution to the floor and Ranking Member Robert Brady (D-PA) for his longstanding commitment to placing a D.C. statue in the Capitol.

“Today, after years of work, our city receives closure that residents will be represented in the Capitol with a statue, like each of the 50 states,” said Norton.  “Next month, on June 19, we will celebrate this long-sought symbol of our American citizenship.  There is no better figure to represent our city than Frederick Douglass, who made the city his home and was deeply involved in D.C. government and in the civic affairs of the city.  Douglass is not only one of the great international icons of human rights, he is remembered in the District also for his outspoken dedication to democratic self-government and congressional representation for the city.”

Norton found a number of allies in the House and Senate to help the District get its own statue in the Capitol.  Last Congress, Senator Charles Schumer (D-NY), chairman of the Rules and Administration Committee, sponsored a stand-alone bill authorizing the move of the Douglass statue to the Capitol.  The House companion to Schumer’s bill, sponsored by former Representative Dan Lungren (R-CA), then-chairman of the Committee on House Administration, and co-sponsored by Norton, was signed into law by President Obama on September 20, 2012.  Senate Majority Whip Dick Durbin (D-IL), then-chairman of the Appropriations Subcommittee on Financial Services and General Government, earlier had included a provision in the fiscal year 2013 appropriations bill, approved by the full committee, authorizing the move of the Douglass statue, but the bill was not considered on the Senate floor.

The Douglass statue will be only the fourth statue or bust in the Capitol that honors an African American.

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 www.norton.house.gov

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Senate Passes Resolution for Frederick Douglass Statue Unveiling in Emancipation Hall on Wednesday, June 19, 2013

Before the Frederick Douglass statue at One Judiciary Square moves to the US Capitol he takes time to read a new book about his life and times in Anacostia. Photo_ John Muller

WASHINGTON, DC – Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC) thanked her colleagues in the Senate for passing a resolution yesterday authorizing the use of Emancipation Hall on Wednesday, June 19, 2013, to unveil the District of Columbia’s Frederick Douglass statue, marking the first time that the District, like the states, will have its own statue in the Capitol.  The resolution is expected on the House floor soon but does not need to be signed into law in order to take effect.  The Congresswoman particularly expressed her gratitude to Senator Charles Schumer (D-NY), chairman of the Senate Rules and Administration Committee, for sponsoring the bill and to Senate Majority Whip Dick Durbin (D-IL), who jumpstarted the effort to move the statue into the Capitol as chairman of the Appropriations Subcommittee on Financial Services and General Government, which has jurisdiction over D.C., when the subcommittee’s s fiscal year 2013 appropriations bill, approved by the full committee but not considered on the Senate floor, included a provision authorizing the move of the statue into Capitol.  Schumer then sponsored a stand-alone bill authorizing the move and the House companion to Schumer’s bill, sponsored by former Rep. Dan Lungren (R-CA), then-chairman of the Committee on House Administration, and co-sponsored by Norton, was signed into law by President Obama on September 20, 2012.

“Our country has always recognized our residents as American citizens when the country goes to war and in the obligation to pay federal income taxes,” Norton said.  “Because D.C. residents have met every obligation of citizenship, they have tried for years to be represented in the Capitol with a statue, donated by them, like each of the 50 states.  Today, with vital assistance from Senators Schumer and Durbin, the District is close to realizing this long sought symbol of their American citizenship.  Frederick Douglass is one of the great international icons of human rights, but D.C. residents chose his statue to represent our city in the Capitol because of the boundless energy he dedicated to the right of D.C. residents to democratic self-government and congressional representation.  Our residents, who have no elected senators of their own, are deeply indebted to Senators Schumer and Durbin for their generous efforts.”

The Douglass statue will be only the fourth statue or bust in the Capitol that honors an African American.

 

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 www.norton.house.gov

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Frederick Douglass statue at FDNHS in Anacostia with his new book, “Frederick Douglass in Washington, D.C.: The Lion of Anacostia” [2012, The History Press]

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Statement from DC Commission on Arts & Humanities, “Frederick Douglass Statue Headed to the Capitol Visitor’s Center”

The DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities is pleased to announce that plans are underway to place the statue of famed Abolitionist and Writer Frederick Douglass’ Statue in the United States Capitol’s Visitor Center’s Statuary Hall, thanks to the signing of a Bill (H.R. 4021)  by President Barack Obama on September 20, 2012.  The Douglass statue has been temporarily housed at DC’s Judiciary Square Building (441 4th Street, NW) since 2007 and was originally commissioned by DC Arts Commission in 2006 through the DC Creates! Public Arts Program.   DC Creates! Public Art Program purchases, commissions, and installs artwork for public sites throughout the District of Columbia. The program was established by 1986 legislation that allocates up to one percent of the District’s adjusted Capital Budget for the commission and acquisition of artwork.

“The DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities is elated to finally see the statue of Frederick Douglass assume its rightful place amongst the fifty states represented in Statuary Hall – what a great day for the District of Columbia,” said Executive Director Lionell Thomas. “We recognize the efforts of Congresswoman Eleanor Homes Norton to move the legislation forward.”

The Douglass statue was selected as the result of a popular vote by DC residents.  The statue was created by sculptor Steven Weitzman who portrayed Douglass in bronze as an orator and writer of the North Star publication.  The North Star, considered the most influential black antislavery newspaper, founded by Douglass in 1847 and published until 1851. Born a slave in Maryland, Douglass made Washington D.C.’s Anacostia neighborhood his home in 1877 until his death in 1895.

The DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities provides grant funds, programs and educational activities that encourage diverse artistic expressions and learning opportunities, so that all District of Columbia residents and visitors can experience the rich culture of our city.

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More information on the DC Commission on Arts & Humanities here.

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