Posts Tagged Star Democrat

David Blight: “We didn’t even get to talk about the older Douglass and all the rest of the women.” Washington College continues to disgrace intellectual and scholastic legacy of Dr. Douglass by dumbing down history, unable to uplift history of Douglass on the Eastern Shore without repeating Dickson Preston.


“Author to discuss Douglass trip to Denton” [Star Democrat, 6 Feb 2019] https://www.stardem.com/news/local_news/author-to-discuss-douglass-trip-to-denton/article_20f2fe9d-0f95-51b4-84cc-f8e7a5bc1ea0.html

“Douglass visited Cambridge, researchers say” [Star Democrat, 25 Sept 2018] https://www.stardem.com/news/local_news/douglass-visited-cambridge-researchers-say/article_f6edd41f-fe68-5089-bb06-9f4130b36e89.html

“Douglass’ college ties extended far and wide” [Star Democrat, 1 Feb 2018] https://www.stardem.com/print/lettereditor/douglass-college-ties-extended-far-and-wide/article_02dce99b-d3a0-5d67-a5bb-0ec20c678b0e.html

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Star Democrat: “Author John Muller to discuss Caroline County Frederick Douglass History” [A5, February 7, 2019]

Author John Muller to discuss Caroline County Frederick Douglass History
By JACK RODGERS jrodgers@chespub.com


DENTON — John Muller, author of Frederick Douglass in Washington, D.C.: The Lion of Anacostia, along with Denton Town Councilwoman Doncella Wilson will be discussing a previous unknown visit Douglass made to Denton.

flyer - fd in caroline county (feb 9, 2019) _ updated timeThe talk will be held at 1:30 p.m. Feb. 9 at the Caroline County Central Library in Denton.

Muller is known for producing a number of works, including Mark Twain in Washington, D.C.: The Adventures of a Capital Correspondent, and is currently working on Lost History: Frederick Douglass and Maryland’s Eastern Shore.

Muller will detail a visit made by Douglass, where he arrived by train before departing by boat to return to Washington, D.C., in late October 1883. Muller also said his research found that Douglass’ grandmother was well known in Denton for selling fishing nets.

“She was very entrepreneurial,” Muller said. “Douglass talks about, in his 1845 autobiography, his grandmother was known in the town of Denton for selling fishing nets. … Basically, today where the Denton steamboat wharf is.”

Muller said his series of talks, speaking last September about a previously undocumented visit by Douglass to Cambridge, are a way to bring lost history to residents.

“Overall, the history of Frederick Douglass post Civil War in the state of Maryland has not yet been told, recognized, acknowledged published — it’s been hidden,” Muller said. “The history of Frederick Douglass in the state of Maryland includes Hagerstown, Cumberland, Frostburg.”

Muller said documenting Douglass’ visits to the Eastern Shore, along with what he does during those visits, help researchers make inferences about his personality.
Muller said one inference he has made, through researching Douglass’ speeches on the Eastern Shore, was that he was highly politically motivated and vocal within the Republican party. Muller said after the Civil War, Douglass knew many influential state politicians running for office.

“Douglass was very involved in local politics in the state of Maryland without ever running for election himself,” Muller said. “He speaks at the courthouse, which I think is very significant because he spoke at at least four courthouses on the Eastern Shore.”

Muller said highlighting the history of Douglass in select counties around the Eastern Shore is part of finding lost history about his life. Muller said the bicentennial celebration of Douglass’ life has motivated him to find more history about his life.

“Douglass had a connection to Caroline County at a very, very young age and maintained that connection through mutual friends and correspondence and physical visits to Caroline County,” Muller said. “I think it was really a culmination of his life.”

For more information on upcoming events, presentations, walking tours and newly discovered research, visit https://thelionofanacostia.wordpress.com or www.facebook.com/LionOfAnacostia.

On Feb. 28, Muller will present “The Lost History of Frederick (Bailey) Douglass in Baltimore,” at the Enoch Pratt Central Library with Dr. Ida E. Jones, Morgan State University’s archivist.


Star Democrat _ 2.7.2019 _ Douglass visited Denton _ A5-page-001

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Star Democrat, “Douglass visited Cambridge” [Print edition, September 26, 2018; front page & p. 11]

Frederick Douglass visited Cambridge, researchers say

Photo by Jack Rodgers, Star Democrat

Douglass visited Cambridge, researchers say

Story by: Jack Rodgers

CAMBRIDGE — The Harriet Tubman Museum hosted two speakers Sept. 21, who spoke about newly found evidence that Frederick Douglass visited Cambridge in 1877.

Linda Duyer, a local Eastern Shore historian and John Muller, author of Frederick Douglass in Washington, D.C: The Lion of Anacostia, both talked about their findings Friday, which point to a Douglass visit.

“We found it to be an extraordinary visit in a number of ways,” Duyer said. “This was a much more exciting visit.”

Duyer said Douglass came to Cambridge by steamboat overnight on Sept. 22, 1877, arriving in the early morning. Douglass was accompanied by John Mercer Langston, abolitionist and U.S. ambassador to Haiti.

The pair left from Long Wharf traveling up High Street, making arrangements to stay at the Cambridge Hotel. At that time, the hotel was on the northwest side of High Street, and was eventually moved to the other side, Duyer said.

Douglass and Langston then traveled to Bethel Church, where they were met by 400 to 500 people, Duyer said. Throughout their visit, Douglass and Langston were followed by bands as they walked through the area, she said.

Duyer said Douglass was not originally set to speak to the crowd, however, he ended up speaking for two hours. Douglass did not use a prepared speech, but spoke directly to both black and white audience members separately, she said.

“At one point he said, ‘Do a man a kindness and you will like him, do him an injury and you will hate him,’ which I thought was interesting,” Duyer said.

Duyer said the town commissioners also had invited Douglass to Cambridge in a proclamation, posted in a local publication. Douglass’ visit to Cambridge also came two months after his visit with his former slavemaster in the county.

Muller said Langston and Douglass had a complicated relationship, which at times may have been adversarial. This made their joint visit more unique, he said.

Muller said Douglass’ visit to Cambridge is groundbreaking and in some way changed his history.

“Frederick Douglass was an outlaw for justice and righteousness,” Muller said. “He was a very sought-after orator, writer and lecturer.”

LINK:

Douglass visited Cambridge, researchers say


Editor’s Note:

I will be presenting at the Union United Methodist Church on Saturday, October 20 at the invitation of the St. Michael’s Museum and at the Easton Branch of the Talbot County Free Library on Thursday, November 1.

See you soon.

JM

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Star Democrat: “Union United Methodist celebrates legacy of Frederick Douglass” (August 20, 2018)

On Sunday, August 20, 2018 Morgan State Professor and Eastern Shoreman Douglassonian Dale Glenwood Green addressed the congregation and visitors of Union United Methodist Church, a pillar in the African-American community of St. Michaels, Maryland since 1852.

With an uplifting message combining personal and local history, examples and testimonials of faith and Biblical verse Professor Green acknowledged the extensive network of his current family, which includes members of the Douglass Family and Bailey Tribe, and his ancestors which include Bishop Alexander Wayman and Reverend Samuel Green.

Thank you to Star Democrat for their continued thorough coverage of Frederick Douglass celebrations and recognition across Talbot County and the entire Shore.

Nice to meet and speak with Kayla Rivas yesterday. Hope to continue to speak with reporters of the Shore’s paper of record. Many years from now historians and family members will review these articles with assurance the Shore uplifted the legacy and heritage of its native son with the assistance of duty-bound information ministers such as Professor Green.

JM


 


SOURCE:

Union United Methodist celebrates legacy of Frederick Douglass,” Star Democrat, Monday, August 20, 2018. Front page, story p. 2. by Kayla Rivas.

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“Douglass’ college ties extended far and wide,” Letter to the Editor of the Star Democrat, February 1, 2018 [Paper of Record of Maryland’s Eastern Shore]

Letter to the Editor, Star Democrat, Feb. 1, 2018. Copyright of fact strictly enforced by the power of the 1st Amendment.

I told Washington College it’s not a game out here.

As an adolescent I ran with great-great grandsons of runaway fugitive slave-scholars. As a young Douglassonian I studied the work of GATH and Dickson J. Preston, two classic role models in the advanced Classics of Douglassoniana Studies.

I thank old school journalists and the editors and staff of the Star Democrat for understanding that if we don’t have accuracy in our reporting we have nothing.

It’s about respecting Dr. Douglass.

He is a native son of your soil and your pork. The mental and physical muscles Douglass stretched to escape slavery were first flexed on the Eastern Shore.

You understand.

Washington College and speculative historian David Blight do not.

[WC press release and “belief” not factually corrected as of 12 noon, February 1, 2018.]

 

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Frederick Douglass Bicentennial Events in Talbot County, Maryland – January & February 2018

FD 200 - Talbot County, MDThe Frederick Douglass Honor Society in partnership with the Talbot County Office of Tourism, have convened a committee of over 35 community organizations and churches to plan for a yearlong schedule of events to celebrate and honor the 200th birthday of Frederick Douglass and to highlight for our community and especially young people, his legacy, values and inspirational messages that is still resilient today.

 

January 2018

9th

Talbot County Council and the Town of Easton proclamation to declare the Year 2018 “Honor Frederick Douglass – An American Hero and Our Native Son.”

18th

National Historic Preservation Alliance will sponsor Living History Interpreter

Bill Grimmette at Waugh United Methodist Church in Cambridge, Maryland

“The Honorable Mr. Douglass returns home to Tuckahoe Creek”

Free admission

February 2018

3rd         11:30-1:00 pm:

Chesapeake College

Black History Luncheon, the Chesapeake College Multicultural Advisory Committee in partnership with The Frederick Douglass Honor Society Celebrates Black History Month.

Guest speaker – Simeaka Melton, Queen Anne’s County Native and Founder, of Dear Girls Academy, Inc.

For ticket information go to: http://www.chesapeake.edu/black-history-month-2018

Historic Marker _ St. Michaels MD _ FD5th           Noon:

Talbot County Free Library – St. Michaels

Brown Bag program: “500 Years of African-American History”, using the magic carpet of original newspapers dating from the 17th through the 21st centuries, Dr. Stephen Goldman transports you through 500 Years of African-American history.  Coffee and dessert will be provided.

7th           5:30 pm:

Panel Discussion

Black History of Talbot County at Oxford Community Center sponsored by John Wesley Preservation Society and African American Museum.

10th        8 – 10 am:

Prayer Breakfast

The Milestone (Sponsored by Frederick Douglass Honor Society)

  •                 Speaker – Pastor Clarence Wayman
  •                 Master of Ceremony – Dale Green
  •                 Music provided by John Wesley Wright (Salisbury University)

10th        4 – 6 pm:

Joy Night @ Union Baptist Church (Talbot County Branch of the NAACP)

University of Maryland – Eastern Shore

Gospel Choir, Union Baptist Choir, The Covenant Choir and The Hill Choir

12th        6 pm:

  • Bill Grimmette a Frederick Douglass Re-enactor at the Academy Art Museum
    $15 Member, $12 Non-Member

14th        Noon:

Celebrate Frederick Douglass’ Birthday – Wreath Laying at Frederick Douglass Statue in front of Talbot Vounty courthouse

  • Guest Speaker – Lyndra Marshall

15th –      Noon:

Talbot County Free Library – Easton

Lunch and Learn about Frederick Douglass Bicentennial.

Coffee and dessert will be provided.

15th –      6:00 pm:

Talbot County Free Library – Easton

Come and learn about Frederick Douglass and the women in his life.

17th        10-1 pm:

Frederick Douglass Family Art Day at the Academy Art Museum

FREE (Registration suggested)

17th      10 a.m. to noon: 4 to 6 year-old children / 1 to 3 p.m.: 7 to 9 year-old children

Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum – STEAM Team class: “Digging into the Past: Happy Birthday, Frederick Douglass!”

17th       2:00 pm:

Talbot County Free Library – St. Michaels

“Putting Them on the Map:  Tracing African American Book History through GIS Technology”

Dr. Alisha Knight, Associate Professor of English and American Studies at Washington College

17th        7 – 9 pm:

Fred Morsel, Douglass re-enactor at the Historic Avalon Theatre in Easton, Maryland
Sponsored by Frederick Douglass Honor Society

23rd        3:30 pm:

Washington College Convocation – Honorary Degree given to Frederick Douglass

26th        12:00 pm -7:00 pm:

Talbot County Free Library – Easton

A day of films about people who shaped and inspired social change.  The day will conclude at 6:00 PM with a screening of Alice’s Ordinary People, a documentary about Alice Tregay, an unsung heroine of the Civil Rights Movement.

 For more information, Talbout County Free Library Winter 2018 Newsletter [PDF]

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Frederick Bailey walking tours … St. Michaels Museum at St. Mary’s Square presents historic walking tours

Dr. Dodson House in St. Michaels

Dr. Dodson House in St. Michaels

ST. MICHAELS — During its 2014 May to October season, St. Michaels Museum at St. Mary’s Square will continue to offer docent-led historic walking tours every Saturday at 10 a.m. beginning May 3.

The major tour, “Historic St. Michaels: its People, Places and Happenings,” will be offered on the first three Saturdays of each month. This tour will give highlights of St. Michaels during the 19th century, chronicling the rise and fall of the shipbuilding industry, the War of 1812 and battles of St Michaels, and the rise of the seafood industry. These stories will be told by viewing many restored structures from that era and describing life of famous and typical residents of these times, including Frederick Douglas. On the fourth Saturday, the museum’s signature tour, “Frederick Douglass, a slave, in St. Michaels 1833-36,” will give a more detailed view of the early life of St. Michaels’ most famous 19th century resident.

These Saturday tours last about 90 minutes and are available for $10 for adults and $5 for children ages 6 to 17, with the fee including both the tour and museum entry fee. Detailed schedules can be found on the museum’s website, www.stmichaelsmuseum.org. Email stmichaelsmuseum@atlanticbb.net for reservations and information. Subject to docent availability, either of these tours can be offered at other times for groups of five or more. Email stmichaelsmuseum@atlanticbb.net or call 410-745-0530 for information on schedules or special group rates.

The new “Historic St. Michaels: its People, Places and Happenings” tour will begin at the museum where a diorama highlights the British attacks on St. Michaels on Aug. 10 and 24, 1813, and the impact of these battles on the St. Michaels community. This will be followed by a walk through St. Mary’s Square to Muskrat Park and then on to Navy Point. Along the way, participants will see many original and restored houses from the 1800s while learning about life in a small waterfront village and the vibrant shipbuilding and seafood industries of that era. Featured are colorful stories of many of the people and events. Highlights include the history of the layout of St. Michaels by James Braddock, the cannon involved in the battle of St. Michaels and the Cannonball House that was struck by a cannon ball that rolled down the interior stairs and frightened a woman holding her baby.

At Muskrat Park, visitors will learn of the transition of Church Cove to Muskrat Green and see replicas of the cannons from 1813. Continuing down Locust Street, they will come to “Hells Crossing,” and at the foot of Carpenter Street is the Higgins Boatyard, the oldest continuously operated boat yard in town and one of several in operation in 1812. Then comes the Dodson House site of Frederick Douglass’ 1877 return to reconcile with his former master. Following on to Navy Point, visitors get a view of St. Michaels Harbor and will hear how Honeymoon Bridge was named, how the seafood industry developed on Navy Point and more about 19th century activities in the harbor.

On the “Frederick Douglass, a slave, in St. Michaels” tour, participants can follow in the footsteps of Frederick Douglass during his teenage years in St. Michaels. Arriving as Frederick Bailey, 15, in 1833 and leaving in 1836 determined to acquire his freedom, his years in St. Michaels were critical in the development of this great man.This tour will offer an historical perspective of Douglass’ life in enslavement and his return to reconcile with his former master.

For more information, call Chip Britt 410-745-0530.

 

Source:

The Star Democrat

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