Posts Tagged Sandy Spring

Video: Historic Howard Chapel Cemetery – note to Sandy Spring Museum & Sandy Spring Slave Museum

 

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Utter ignorance of Sandi L. Williams of the Sandy Spring Slave Museum presents crisis within local country roads history community

Honorable Coach Crutchfield, my 9th grade gym teacher at Sherwood, with glasses. The disgraceful and dishonorable Sandi Williams talking to the girls basketball team at Sherwood.

Coming up around the country road junction of Sunshine Burger at Georgia Avenue & New Hampshire Avenue I caught chatter at a young age and while a student at Sherwood High School that Frederick Douglass was intimately affiliated with the community and several families. 

As an adult, after traveling the corners of the world to speak at the most prestigious libraries and institutions of higher learning, I learned what the real history is and was.

The oral history I heard as a teen going 105 miles an hour in Thomas’ Intrepid on Brooke Road is true. What Sandy Spring says about the connection of Frederick Douglass to the community and families is true; make-believe chair or not.

In December of 2018 I spoke at the Sandy Spring Museum. In April 2019 I spoke at Woodlawn Manor, attended by Dr. Anderson, founder of the Sandy Spring Slave Museum.

In October 2019 I attended an information session held by the Sandy Spring Museum regarding a nearly $30,000 grant they received to document the “Historically Black Communities of Sandy Spring.” There has no been zero follow-up on the history from the Sandy Spring Museum and Allison Weiss.

To compound all this inaction, indifference and ignorance, we have Sandi L. Williams.

Sandi L. Williams, an administrator with Montgomery County Public Schools, is one of the main administrators of the Sandy Spring Slave Museum.

Below are text messages she sent immediately following a comment I made on the Sandy Spring Slave Museum’s Instagram account about their not knowing their own history.

For example, the history of Sandy Spring’s Black American community is largely the history of an independent and autonomous Free Black community so why it is called the “Sandy Spring Slave Museum,”?

I have always understood the name of the museum to be a misnomer.

Therefore henceforth whereas herein I hereby declare with the authority of being introduced to the Sandy Spring spring by Coach Crutch that I have an ancient and sacred obligation to not only call Sandi L. Williams out her name and my community, but additionally share, whereas I respected Ruby I have no respect for her daughter.

And I would tell Ruby this if I could. You can check the year book to confirm I will say whatever I want to anyone despite any idle threats.

Do you threaten your students at Wheaton High School & Montgomery County Public Schools, how you threaten me?

You should not be working in any capacity as an educator within the public schools and your leadership of the Sandy Spring Slave Museum is nothing less than dishonorable and disgraceful.


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“Lost History: Frederick Douglass in Montgomery County” (Wednesday, April 24, 2019 @ 7:00 pm -> Woodlawn Manor Cultural Park)

Image result for frederick douglass emily edmonsonHave you heard stories of Frederick Douglass stepping through the country roads of Brinklow and Sandy Spring in Montgomery County, Maryland?

According to oral tradition Dr. Douglass, an internationally known abolitionist, statesman, orator and journalist, was known to visit multiple families in the Montgomery County area.

Emily Edmonson Johnson, born an enslaved person in Montgomery County and an escapee of the Pearl in 1848, was photographed with Frederick Douglass and other abolitionist at a convention in New York to protest the 1850 Fugitive Slave Law.

Following her education at Oberlin in Ohio and serving as a teacher at the Miner School in Washington, D.C., Edmonson married Larkin Johnson in the early 1860s and lived in the greater Sandy Spring community for nearly a decade.

She later moved to Hillsdale in Southeast Washington, D.C., adjacent to the Anacostia neighborhood, where her long-time friend Frederick Douglass lived. Today Cedar Hill is preserved as the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site at 1411 W Street SE.

Find out more about Frederick Douglass and his connections from Sharp Street Methodist Church in Sandy Spring to state politics in post-Civil War Maryland and unknown visits to communities from Cumberland to Cambridge.

Register Here!


Wednesday, April 24, 2019 at 7:00 pm
Woodlawn Manor Cultural Park
16501 Norwood Road
Sandy Spring, Maryland 20860

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Upcoming presentations and talks on “Lost History of Frederick Douglass” (February – April 2019) across the entire state of Maryland from Baltimore to Denton to Hagerstown

*FEBRUARY*

Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 1 pm
Central Library – Denton, Caroline County Public Library
100 Market Street
Denton, MD 21629

Lost History of Frederick Douglass in Caroline County, Maryland

Following the discovery and presentation of the “Lost History of Frederick Douglass in Cambridge, Maryland,” local historian John Muller will present on the unknown history of Frederick Douglass in Caroline County.

Monday, February 11, 2019 
Sheraton Hotel
Alexandria, Virginia
Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States

“Frederick Douglass and the Lincoln Family”

Tuesday, February 12, 2019 at 7 pm
Hagerstown Central Branch, Washington County Free Library
100 South Potomac Street
Hagerstown, Maryland 21740

“Lost History of Frederick Douglass in Hagerstown, Maryland”

Frederick Douglass rose from the depths of slavery on Maryland’s Eastern Shore to travel three continents and counsel a half-dozen Presidents.

You may think you know his story but did you know Douglass visited Hagerstown?!

In 1879 Douglass took a train to “Hub City” where he delivered an address to benefit Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church. Future United States Congressman and United States Senator, Hagerstonian Louis E. McComas introduced Douglass before he spoke at the court house on Washington Street.

Hear historian and author John Muller share never before published details of Dr. Frederick Douglass’ visit to Hagerstown walking the community and lodging in the historic Washington House.

Saturday, February 16, 2019 at 2 pm
Ebenezer African Methodist Episcopal Church
26 Bethel Street
Hagerstown, Maryland 21740

“Lost History of Frederick Douglass in Western Maryland”

Using newly discovered information found in public and private archives, Muller will share information that uplifts the history of consequential visits Douglass made to Frederick City, Hagerstown and Cumberland, as well as lifelong associations Douglass had with abolitionists, politicians, and faith and community leaders of the Cumberland Valley region.

Saturday, February 23, 2019
Delaplaine Visual Arts Center
40 South Carroll Street
Frederick, Maryland 21701
Frederick County Historic Sites Consortium Yearly Master Docent Series Workshop 2019

Thursday, February 28, 2019 at 6:30 pm
Enoch Pratt Central Library, African American Department 
400 Cathedral Street
Baltimore, Maryland 21201

John Muller, author of Frederick Douglass in Washington, D.C.: The Lion of Anacostia and Mark Twain in Washington, D.C.: The Adventures of a Capital Correspondent, will present “The Lost History of Frederick (Bailey) Douglass in Baltimore” using newly discovered information found in the Baltimore City Archives, Maryland Historical Society, Enoch Pratt Free Library, and private archives. Muller has presented widely throughout the DC-Baltimore metropolitan area at venues including the Library of Congress, Newseum, Politics and Prose, American Library in Paris and local universities. He is currently working on a book about the lost history of Frederick Douglass on Maryland’s Eastern Shore.

John Muller will be in conversation with Dr. Ida E. Jones, Morgan State University archivist.

Writers LIVE programs are supported in part by a bequest from The Miss Howard Hubbard Adult Programming Fund. 


*APRIL*

Tuesday, April 6, 2019
Frostburg State University
Frostburg, Maryland
“Lost History of Frederick Douglass in Cumberland and Allegany County, Maryland”

Wednesday, April 24, 2019 at 7:00 pm
Woodlawn Manor Cultural Park
16501 Norwood Road
Sandy Spring, Maryland 20860

Image result for frederick douglass emily edmonsonHave you heard stories of Frederick Douglass stepping through the country roads of Brinklow and Sandy Spring?

According to oral tradition Dr. Douglass, an internationally known abolitionist, statesmen, orator and journalist, was known to visit multiple families in our area.

Emily Edmonson Johnson, born an enslaved person in Montgomery County and an escapee of the Pearl in 1848, was photographed with Frederick Douglass and other abolitionist at a convention to protest the 1850 Fugitive Slave Law. Following her education at Oberlin in Ohio and serving as a teacher at the Miner School in Washington, D.C., Edmonson married Larkin Johnson in the early 1860s and lived in the Sandy Spring community for nearly a decade. She later moved to Hillsdale in Washington, D.C., adjacent to Anacostia where her friend Frederick Douglass lived which is preserved as the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site.

Find out more about Frederick Douglass and his connections from Sharp Street Church to state politics in post-Civil War Maryland and unknown visits to communities from Cumberland to Cambridge.

Saturday, April 27, 2019
Porch Program at the Newcomer House
18422 Shepherdstown Pike
Keedysville, Maryland 21756

“Lost History of Frederick Douglass in Western Maryland”

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HISTORY HAPPY HOUR: FREDERICK DOUGLASS IN WASHINGTON DC (Sandy Spring Museum @ December 7, 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm)

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HISTORY HAPPY HOUR: FREDERICK DOUGLASS IN WASHINGTON DC

December 7 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

The remarkable journey of Frederick Douglass from fugitive slave to famed orator and author is well documented, yet little has been written about Douglass’s final years in Washington, D.C.

John Muller, journalist, historian, playwright, tour guide, and policy analyst in Washington, D.C., has developed a specialized knowledge of the history of the Anacostia community, the city’s first sub-division. His book, Frederick Douglass in Washington D.C.: The Lion of Anacostia (2012), was selected as the DC Public Library’s 2013 DC Reads. His articles on the area’s history and neighborhood politics have appeared in Huffington Post, Washington Post and Washington Times, among other publications. Muller and has given programs at the Library of Congress, the Newseum, and other local and national venues.

History Happy Hours include happy hour drinks and snacks.  The series is sponsored by Therrien Waddell Construction Group.

For tickets:

https://www.sandyspringmuseum.org/event/frederickdouglass/

 

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Forthcoming profiles of “Black Women in the World of Frederick Douglass” to provide fuller history than selective and restrictive “[White] Women in the World of Frederick Douglass” (Oxford University Press, 2017)

FD statue in Rochester _ Leigh Fought bookLeMoyne College professor Leigh Fought, author of Women in the World of Frederick Douglass, has recently decided to insert herself into my ongoing refutation of the speculative “scholarship” of disgraceful David Blight.

Until Prof. Fought decided to reach I have quietly kept reoccurring critiques I’ve heard of her award-winning book to myself.

Politics of respectability need no longer apply 1) after Fought posted a message on her blog about me without so much as letting me know and 2) deleted my initial comments apologizing for involving her, although she initially provided her full consent, with ongoing research projects into records pertaining to Anna Douglass and other family members that have remained elusive and unpublished.

Dr. Fought was asked and enlisted in these research pursuits because of her professionalism but she has shown herself to prioritize pettiness over the pursuit of scholarship. Prof. Fought’s actions are not only disgraceful to the journalistic legacy of Dr. Douglass but to the journalism of Helen Pitts Douglass.


Taught about history on the county roads & back of the late night 70 bus

While a student at Sherwood High School in Sandy Spring, Maryland I frequently called out not only the errors and textbook omissions in our world history and US history classes but other classmates. I was known to get passionate and sometimes would more than call out a fellow student or two. (I did the same in college.)

My high school teachers were of little to no help calming me down, with the exception of Vietnam combat veteran and AP US History teacher Robert J. Washek. Often my classmates would intervene to calm me down so as to prevent me from crossing the line. On more than one occasion a young African-American woman, or women, grabbed me by the arm and took me into the hallway to either provide counsel or a moment of prayer to calm me down.

That is how I came up.

I thank E. Bacon, C. Williams, K. Dawkins, M. Sawyer, A. Philpot, T. Stewart, K. Jones, the late E. Cray and many others who I can’t recall without the aid of a yearbook.

I recently spoke to an old high school classmate and told her about the intellectual delicateness and fragile egos of fellow Douglass scholars, including the genteel Leigh Fought. I will trust counsel of someone I’ve known for twenty years over the “gas lighting” efforts of an insincere scholar who was initially helpful and supportive of my efforts, including donating money to a community conference and mural installation at 16th & W Street SE.

According to a dear friend I’ve known since I was 12, “Give them the same grief you gave our teachers. That’s their job to deal with it and recognize the validity. If not, I know how you go. We all know how you go. I don’t think they understand where you’re coming from, where we are all from. Let them know. We taught you, so you better teach them. I pray for them. They don’t know who they are playing with.”

My friend, who read Prof. Fought’s book, suggested I begin a series on the blog, Black Women in the World of Frederick Douglass.

While Prof. Fought went nobly further than any previous biographers in treating the Douglass family — specifically Anna, Rosetta and other women within the intimate cipher of Dr. Douglass — with respect and scholarship there are massive errors, omissions and more than a couple misinterpretations in her work.


Troubling statements and omissions in [White] Women in the World of Frederick Douglass

As Prof. Fought has says, Dr. Douglass ran with a “legion” of women from various reformist movements yet [White] Women in the World of Frederick Douglass is largely a minimization and whitewashing of the associations Dr. Douglass had with women of African descent.

For example, Emily Edmonson, a student at Oberlin College, teacher at the Miner School and a confidant of Dr. Douglass, for nearly a half-century, while a resident of both Sandy Spring, Maryland and Hillsdale, Washington, D.C. in the modern-day Barry Farm community of Southeast is mentioned one single time in the body text of Fought’s manuscript.

On page 140 Edmonson, who also warrants a caption and source note, is described simply as a “former slave.”  White Women in the World of FD _ EmilyEd

“Furor over Frederick and Julia subsided for a time in 1854. In February and March, Julia joined Gerrit Smith, now a congressman, in Washington, DC, reporting her observations of the nation’s capital for Frederick Douglass; Paper. In June, she traveled to Canada West, bringing aid to former slave Emily Edmonson for black expatriates suffering from famine.

This is troubling.

White Women in the World of FD _ JM mentionI attempted to forewarn Prof. Fought. She alludes to my warning in her acknowledgements:

John Muller, who knows more about Douglass in DC and the neighborhood around Cedar Hill than I thought possible, who pointed me toward the black women whom Douglass worked with there, and who is a meticulous researcher.

That said, I am a street reporter and a street historian. I came up in the community and the community is where I remain.

Scholars, such as Prof. Fought, who cannot debate and have a conversation are not scholars; they are dangerous propagandists of their own distortions, misinterpretations and lies.

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