Posts Tagged Republican Party

1876 Republican National Convention at Cincinnati [Illustration]

SOURCE:

Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, July 1, 1876, p. 272 – 273

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Frederick Douglass and Robert Todd Lincoln reportedly “favored by colored republicans of Washington” for revolutionary Presidential ticket in 1888 election

Image may contain: one or more people, people standing and outdoor

Photo and research by William Alston-El. Copyright and trademark strictly enforced.

In preparation for my upcoming presentation on “Frederick Douglass and the Lincoln Family” in memory of Mr. John Elliff and Honorable William Alston-El I took my research to 16th & W Street SE for consultation.

Quiet as kept, in historical discussions and debates with W Street Douglassonians sacred and lost history of Dr. Douglass, respected as an omnipresent spirit and presence on Old Ana corners mural or not, is shared with me.

I have been entrusted by members of the community to share with the world the localized neighborhood history of Dr. Douglass that has been closely guarded and protected from the outside world for more than a century. Respect has to be earned in Old Anacostia.

“Uncle Fred and Uncle Abe’s son were friends,” a W Street Douglassonian told me.

“Yep. Chatter of them making a run for President and Vice President. That’s the untold and unknown history we live with, the underground history, knowing we’ve had to fight for everything we’ve ever earned in a country that said in the founding document we were 3/5 of a human. That is our history. Frederick Douglass is also our history. We don’t know Fred and we need to. Fred did everything he could to uplift us as a people. We tell you so you can tell them.”


Man respect man.

I have respected and admired the Lincoln Group of the District of Columbia for many years now.

With all due respect for the invitation and honor of addressing the Lincoln Group on October 16th I had to bring forth street historian scholarship from 16th & W Street SE.

As my friend from W Street shared, in the late 1880s there was speculation of a Republican presidential ticket of Dr. Frederick (Bailey) Douglass and Secretary Robert Todd Lincoln.

Without further editorializing — and explanation of my research techniques to the disgraceful “White Man Lies” and “White Woman Lies” collective of David Blight, Leigh Fought, Adam Goodheart, John Stauffer, Kate Larson and others — I provide scholarship emanating from the Master Educators holding street corners in Old Anacostia.

JM


Southern standard., October 01, 1887, Page 5 _ cropped

Washington Letter. [1]

WASHINGTON, Sept. 27, 1887.

….

While all is so quiet in politics – this being an off year – it may startle if it does not awe your readers, that a new Presidential ticket and a wonderful combination it is, too, linking as it does two of the great names of the nation, has been launched here in the Capital.

And well may President Cleveland, as he realizes the strength of this “combine” quake in his boots, as he sees his vision of a second term vanish into thin air, for how does he dare to oppose the Presidential aspirations of those men of renown, those eminent statesmen who will favorably compare with the fathers of the Republic – Lincoln and Douglass!

Yes, I repeat it, Robert Lincoln and Frederick Douglass.

The glorious deed was done at a banquet given to Douglass, the intellectual giant of the negro race, on the anniversary of emancipation day, and though, by a strange coincidence, Robert, the son of his father, happened to be in this city at the same time, I do not know that he is committed to the movement, yet his presence here on such an occasion may be significant.


InkedBurlington weekly free press., September 30, 1887, p. 2 __ Douglass and Lincoln ticket_ cropped _ red inkThe “Washington Letter” containing the above anecdote was syndicated in newspapers throughout the South as far as Texas.

In some papers the news item was condensed and boiled down to the base alloy of the possibility of what would have been at the time the most revolutionary presidential ticket in American history.

[2] “Robert Lincoln and Fred Douglass is the presidential ticket favored by colored republicans of Washington.”


SOURCE:

[1] “Washington Letter” [September 27, 1887], Southern Standard (Tennessee), October 1, 1887, page 5.

[2] “PERSONAL AND POLITICAL.” Burlington Weekly Free Press (Vermont), September 30, 1887, page 2.

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Frederick Douglass looks dead at the camera for photo of the Republican Notification Committee, Washington, D.C., Monday, June 20th, 1892 [NMAAHC]

Republican Notification Committee, Washington, D.C., Monday, June 20th, 1892A black-and-white photograph of men seated and standing in front of a doorway. They wear coats, many wear ties, and several hold bowler and top-hats. At the bottom right of the photograph is the address, “11th and Pa. Ave. N.W., Washington, D.C.”

Below the photograph is written “Republican Notification Committee / Washington, D.C., / Monday, June 20th 1892.” Frederick Douglass stands at the back, just left of the doorway.

FD _ closeA close-up of the visage of Douglass, the look of a man with serious life lived.

While many in the photo seem to have their attentions focused elsewhere or have their eyes slightly askew, Douglass is looking directly at the camera, dead eye.

 

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Speech of Frederick Douglass at the 1876 Republican National Convention

FD _ LOC

Library of Congress

SPEECH OF MR. DOUGLASS. “Mr. President and Gentlemen of the National Republican Convention: Allow me to express my deep, my heartfelt gratitude to you for the warm, the cordial invitation you have extended to me to make my  appearance on this platform at this time. The work to which you have called me is somewhat new. It is the first time in my life that I have ever had the pleasure of looking the Republican party squarely in the face. And I must say,—and I hope you will acquit me of everything like a disposition to flatter,—that you are a pretty good looking man. But I will not detain you here by any attempt at a speech. You have had speeches,—eloquent speeches, glorious speeches, wise speeches, patriotic speeches ; speeches in respect to the importance of managing correctly your currency ; speeches in defence of purity of administration; and speeches in respect to the great principles for which you struggled, and for which the race to which I belong struggled on the battlefield, and poured out their blood.

The thing, however, in which I feel the deepest interest, and the thing in which I believe this country feels the deepest interest, is, that the principles involved in the contest which carried your sons and brothers to the battlefield; which draped our Northern churches with the weeds of mourning, and filled our towns and our cities with mere stumps of men,—armless, legless, maimed, and mutilated; those for which you poured out your blood, and piled a debt for after-coming generations higher than a mountain of gold, to weigh down the necks of your children and your children’s children,—I say that those principles, those interests involved in that tremendous contest, ought to be dearer to the American people, in the great political struggle now upon them, than any other principles we have.

You say you have emancipated us. You have ; and I thank you for it. You say you have enfranchised us. You have ; and I thank you for it. But what is your emancipation?—what is your enfranchisement? What does it all amount to, if the black man, after having been made free by the letter of your law, is unable to exercise that freedom, and, after having been freed from the slaveholder’s lash, he is to be subject to the slaveholder’s shot-gun? Oh! you freed us! You emancipated us ! I thank you for it. But under what circumstances did you emancipate us ? Under what circumstances have we obtained our freedom ? Sir, ours is the most extraordinary case of any people ever emancipated on the globe. I sometimes wonder that we still exist as a people in this country ; that we have not all been swept out of existence, with nothing left to show that we ever existed. Look at it. When the Israelites were emancipated, they were told to go and borrow of their neighbors,—borrow their coin, borrow their jewels, load themselves down with the means of subsistence : after, they should go free in the land which the Lord God gave them. When the Russian serfs had their chains broken and were given their liberty, the government of Russia—aye, the despotic government of Russia—gave to those poor emancipated serfs a few acres of land on which they could live and earn their bread. But when you turned us loose, you gave us no acres : you turned us loose to the sky, to the storm, to the whirlwind, and, worst of all, you turned us loose to the wrath of our infuriated masters.

The question now is, Do you mean to make good to us the promises in your constitution? Talk not to me of finance. Talk not of mere reform in your administration. I believe there is honesty in the American people ; honesty in the men whom you will elect ; wisdom in the men to manage those affairs, —but tell me, if your heart be as my heart, that the liberty which you have asserted for the black man in this country shall be maintained? You say, some of you, that you can get along without the vote of the black man of the South. Yes, that may be, possibly ; but I doubt it. At any rate, in order to insure our protection hereafter, we feel the need, in the candidate whom you will place before the country, of the assurance that, if it be necessary, the black man shall walk to the ballot-box in safety, even if we have to bring a bayonet behind us. And I have this this feeling, that, if we bring forth either of the gentlemen named here, the government of the United States and the moral feeling of the coun try will surround the black voter as by a wall of fire ; and, instead of electing your President without the black vote, you may count in the number of your victorious Republican states five or six, at least, of the old master states of the South. But I have no voice to ad dress you longer; and you may now move, down there, for an ad adjournment.”

Note: The 1876 Republican National Convention was held in Cincinnati Ohio. Douglass was a delegate and attendee at Republican National Convention for numerous elections. The last convention he attended was in 1892 when the convention was held in Minnesota.

SOURCE:

PROCEEDINGS of the REPUBLICAN National Convention Held at CINCINNATI, OHIO, WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY, AND FRIDAY, June 14, 15, and 16, 1876,

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Frederick Douglass Endorses The “National Leader” [NL, 19 Jan., 1889, 4]

National Leader, 19 Jan 1889 _ FD endorses National LeaderHon. Frederick Douglass Endorses The “National Leader.”

The Most Staunch Supporter of the Republican Party Now Published in This Country

Cedar Hill, Anacostia, D.C.

November 26, 1888

 

Magnes L. Robinson:

My Dear Sir: – I have read with interesting interest the editorials in the National Leader of late and have no hesitation in pronouncing the Leader as one of the most staunch supporters of the Republican party now published in this country. I do hope you will be able to keep your banner on the outer wall permanently. Do not let us clamor for office, but for rights.

Very Truly Yours,

Fred’K Douglass.

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131 years ago, today, Frederick Douglass was confirmed as D.C. Recorder of Deeds

While interning at the National Archives’ Center for Legislative Archives in the summer of 2010, Daniel Rice stumbled upon an important document to Douglass-cana; 20th President James Garfield‘s (R) nomination of Frederick Douglass as D.C. Recorder of Deeds.

According to a post on “Rice on History,” (Daniel’s blog) the nomination (No. 352) was bunched among a slew of President Garfield’s cabinet nominations, all dated March 4th, 1881.

The nomination reads,

“To The Senate of the United States:

I nominate Frederick Douglass of the District of Columbia to be the Recorder of Deeds in the District of Columbia, vice George A. Sheridan who has resigned.”

On May 17, 1881, 131 years ago today, Douglass was confirmed by a 47-8 vote in the United States Senate. Make sure you check out the post on “Rice on History” to view photos of the actual voting tally.

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