Posts Tagged President Garfield

Society of the Army of Cumberland invites Frederick Douglass, Esquire to Local Executive Committee meeting at the Ebbitt House; a note on misleading “memory history” of the Civil War and Dr. Douglass


Following the Union Army’s defeat of the Confederate States Army the process of Reconstruction was led by many individuals and institutions. The interconnectedness and intersectionality of Dr. Douglass to these reconstructive efforts superabounds in existing documents, reports, memoirs, ephemera, newspaper accounts and lost histories.

Major Charles R. Douglass was active in the Grand Army of the Republic. His father, Dr. Frederick Douglass, while not a direct combat veteran was a recruiter for the Union and thusly welcomed into the fraternity of organizations which sought to promote the values of liberty and brotherhood in which hundreds of thousands had made the ultimate sacrifice for.

While speculative scholarship has proliferated in recent decades, under the troubling, incomplete and selective guise, or rather paradigm, of “memory history” promoted by popular American historians, there is an unavailability of scholarship on the organizations and networks in which Dr. Douglass ran.

Communities of journalists, politicians, educators, abolitionists, suffragists, preachers and artisans are all groups known to have close associations and connections with Dr. Frederick Douglass but their presence and relevance to the complete story has yet to be told. The folks that yammer about intersectionality have no clue what they are talking about. They have buzz-fuzz cliches and phrases not scholarship and research.

In post-Civil War Washington City generals and rank officers were legion. Union veterans Ulysses S. Grant, Rutherford B. Hayes, James Garfield, Chester Arthur and Benjamin Harrison served as American Presidents and Dr. Douglass ran with them all. You scholars already know about General Oliver Otis Howard but who else is known?

Among veterans of both the Union and the Confederate States of America Dr. Douglass commanded respect. Few historians who invoke the name of Dr. Douglass convey this truth. Memory historians have failed to uplift the fallen history.

W Street Douglassonians are not wrong in expecting lauded historians to muster more than a pseudo-psycho speculative interpretation, or rather a “memory history,” of Dr. Douglass’ April 1876 Oration Delivered on the Occasion of the Unveiling of the Freedmen’s Monument. A focus on this singular speech of Dr. Douglass again, and again and again is an incomplete history, a selective history, a convenient history, a lazy history and most importantly a misleading and dishonest history.

Until a new generation and a new collective of historians emerge to challenge the repetitive status quo of simp history half-truths and untruths will masquerade as truth.

JM


 

DOCUMENT:

Invitation of General Henry Clark Corbin (via Judge Arthur MacArthur), Society of the Army of the Cumberland, Headquarters Local Executive Committee to Frederick Douglass, Esquire.

SOURCE:

Frederick Douglass Papers, Correspondence
Folder, 1879
Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.

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131 years ago, today, Frederick Douglass was confirmed as D.C. Recorder of Deeds

While interning at the National Archives’ Center for Legislative Archives in the summer of 2010, Daniel Rice stumbled upon an important document to Douglass-cana; 20th President James Garfield‘s (R) nomination of Frederick Douglass as D.C. Recorder of Deeds.

According to a post on “Rice on History,” (Daniel’s blog) the nomination (No. 352) was bunched among a slew of President Garfield’s cabinet nominations, all dated March 4th, 1881.

The nomination reads,

“To The Senate of the United States:

I nominate Frederick Douglass of the District of Columbia to be the Recorder of Deeds in the District of Columbia, vice George A. Sheridan who has resigned.”

On May 17, 1881, 131 years ago today, Douglass was confirmed by a 47-8 vote in the United States Senate. Make sure you check out the post on “Rice on History” to view photos of the actual voting tally.

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