Posts Tagged pictures

Video: “Picturing Frederick Douglass” _ Prof. Zoe Trodd (University of Nottingham)

Zoe Trodd, Professor and Chair of American Literature in the Department of American and Canadian Studies at the University of Nottingham, draws on new research into previously uncollected photographs of Douglass to show that he was the most photographed American of the 19th century. She argues that in sitting for more photographs than any of his peers, Douglass was using photographs in multiple ways: to assert black humanity in place of the slave “thing”; to show how authentic representations could break down racial barriers; to create a black public persona within the abolitionist culture of dissent.

Trodd also outlines the visual legacy of these 160+ photographs, including protest paintings and drawings with the anti-lynching and desegregation movement, statues and sculptures from 1899 to 2010, cartoons in the 20th-century black press, and murals and street art in the North, South and West, especially murals celebrating a broader history of African American dissent. She will consider which 19th-century photographs had the most impact in this 20th-century visual legacy, address the politics of adapting the youthful, stern Douglass of earlier photographs versus the elderly, sage Douglass of later photographs, and ask whether Douglass photographs had an even greater legacy in visual culture than his famous writings had in literary texts.

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“The Many Faces of Frederick Douglass,” Dr. Celeste-Marie Bernier, Sept. 19, 2014 [Maryland State House Old House of Delegates Chamber

Many Faces of Frederick Douglass _ Sept_1As an individual who was not only a household name but a household image in the nineteenth century, Frederick Douglass made repeated appearances across countless photographic portraits, engravings, lithographs, paintings and sculpture created by both Black and white
artists. Recognising the racist forces at work in the typically grotesquely caricatured visual incarnations produced by white artists, Douglass remained at war against the intellectual, aesthetic, social, moral and political damage resulting from attempts to commodify and objectify not only his own physicality but the corporeal realities of black women, children and men more generally. This lecture will introduce audiences to Douglass’ lesser and even unknown appearances in fine art and popular images.

Maryland State House
Old House of Delegates Chamber
Friday, September 19, 2014

4:00PM-5:00PM

A Valid ID is required to enter the Maryland State House

For General Questions: 410-260-6487

http://msa.maryland.gov/

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