Posts Tagged Newspapers

Frederick Douglass and Robert Todd Lincoln reportedly “favored by colored republicans of Washington” for revolutionary Presidential ticket in 1888 election

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Photo and research by William Alston-El. Copyright and trademark strictly enforced.

In preparation for my upcoming presentation on “Frederick Douglass and the Lincoln Family” in memory of Mr. John Elliff and Honorable William Alston-El I took my research to 16th & W Street SE for consultation.

Quiet as kept, in historical discussions and debates with W Street Douglassonians sacred and lost history of Dr. Douglass, respected as an omnipresent spirit and presence on Old Ana corners mural or not, is shared with me.

I have been entrusted by members of the community to share with the world the localized neighborhood history of Dr. Douglass that has been closely guarded and protected from the outside world for more than a century. Respect has to be earned in Old Anacostia.

“Uncle Fred and Uncle Abe’s son were friends,” a W Street Douglassonian told me.

“Yep. Chatter of them making a run for President and Vice President. That’s the untold and unknown history we live with, the underground history, knowing we’ve had to fight for everything we’ve ever earned in a country that said in the founding document we were 3/5 of a human. That is our history. Frederick Douglass is also our history. We don’t know Fred and we need to. Fred did everything he could to uplift us as a people. We tell you so you can tell them.”


Man respect man.

I have respected and admired the Lincoln Group of the District of Columbia for many years now.

With all due respect for the invitation and honor of addressing the Lincoln Group on October 16th I had to bring forth street historian scholarship from 16th & W Street SE.

As my friend from W Street shared, in the late 1880s there was speculation of a Republican presidential ticket of Dr. Frederick (Bailey) Douglass and Secretary Robert Todd Lincoln.

Without further editorializing — and explanation of my research techniques to the disgraceful “White Man Lies” and “White Woman Lies” collective of David Blight, Leigh Fought, Adam Goodheart, John Stauffer, Kate Larson and others — I provide scholarship emanating from the Master Educators holding street corners in Old Anacostia.

JM


Southern standard., October 01, 1887, Page 5 _ cropped

Washington Letter. [1]

WASHINGTON, Sept. 27, 1887.

….

While all is so quiet in politics – this being an off year – it may startle if it does not awe your readers, that a new Presidential ticket and a wonderful combination it is, too, linking as it does two of the great names of the nation, has been launched here in the Capital.

And well may President Cleveland, as he realizes the strength of this “combine” quake in his boots, as he sees his vision of a second term vanish into thin air, for how does he dare to oppose the Presidential aspirations of those men of renown, those eminent statesmen who will favorably compare with the fathers of the Republic – Lincoln and Douglass!

Yes, I repeat it, Robert Lincoln and Frederick Douglass.

The glorious deed was done at a banquet given to Douglass, the intellectual giant of the negro race, on the anniversary of emancipation day, and though, by a strange coincidence, Robert, the son of his father, happened to be in this city at the same time, I do not know that he is committed to the movement, yet his presence here on such an occasion may be significant.


InkedBurlington weekly free press., September 30, 1887, p. 2 __ Douglass and Lincoln ticket_ cropped _ red inkThe “Washington Letter” containing the above anecdote was syndicated in newspapers throughout the South as far as Texas.

In some papers the news item was condensed and boiled down to the base alloy of the possibility of what would have been at the time the most revolutionary presidential ticket in American history.

[2] “Robert Lincoln and Fred Douglass is the presidential ticket favored by colored republicans of Washington.”


SOURCE:

[1] “Washington Letter” [September 27, 1887], Southern Standard (Tennessee), October 1, 1887, page 5.

[2] “PERSONAL AND POLITICAL.” Burlington Weekly Free Press (Vermont), September 30, 1887, page 2.

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Lecture of United States Marshal Frederick Douglass announced in daily Hagerstown newspaper [April 1879]

FD Lecture _ Hagerstown _ Daily News _ April 27, 1879

 

SOURCE:

Microfilm holdings; Washington County Library, Hagerstown Branch

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Dr. Frederick Douglass was a Marylander; addresses Emancipation Day in Cumberland, Maryland [September 22, 1879]

An an indigenous Eastern Shoreman Dr. Frederick (Bailey) Douglass could rightfully claim identity as a Baltimorean and thus kinship status as a Marylander through and through.

Lost to history have been several return visits Dr. Douglass made to the Shore as well as numerous lifelong relationships he maintained with Marylanders from members of the Lloyd family to abolitionist and educator Emily Edmonson of Montgomery County. Additionally, the speeches and activities of Dr. Douglass throughout the different regions and areas of his native state are widely forgotten in existing scholarship and bicentennial commemorations.

Untold by his own hand and biographers, in September 1879 Dr. Douglass visited the Cumberland Valley, drawing a reported 2,000 whites and blacks to the city of Cumberland from West Virginia, Pennsylvania and Western Maryland.

Cumberland Fairgrounds - WCFL

Courtesy of Washington County Free Library, Western Maryland Room

Sharing the stage with former Congressman and Lincoln appointee Henry W. Hoffman, Dr. Douglass spoke to acknowledge September 22nd as Emancipation Day, whereas 17 years before President Abraham Lincoln issued his preliminary Emancipation Proclamation.

In truth, Dr. Douglass ran with many men, such as Henry O. Wagoner and James W. C. Pennington, who traveled out of underground railroad stations in Western Maryland to freedom. Martin Delany, one of Douglass’ early associates, was indigenous to the Appalachia area.

In the 1880s Dr. Douglass frequently traveled to Harper’s Ferry to attend to his duties as a board member of Storer College.

Known to travel near and far within his home state and throughout the country and world, I’ve confirmed Dr. Douglass spoke in Hagerstown for the benefit of a local church in 1879, about six months before visiting Cumberland in September.

Point is: Dr. Douglass, an Eastern Shoreman by birth and Point Boy by initiation, touched all parts of his native state, including Allegheny and Washington counties in Western Maryland.

It is beyond time to uplift the history and give Dr. Douglass the full recognition he so rightfully deserves as a Marylander.

JM


Frostburg Mining Journal _ 27 Sept 1879 _ p. 3 _ FD in Cumberland _ croppedANNIVERSARY OF EMANCIPATION.

Monday, 22d inst., emancipation day was celebrated in Cumberland with much rejoicing by the colored people, who poured into the city on every train. The procession formed at the Queen City Hotel about half past 12 and marched through the principal streets to the fair grounds where dinner was served and addresses delivered by Hons Frederick Douglass, of Washington, and Henry W. Hoffman, of Cumberland, and others.

Frostburg was fully represented.


SOURCE:

Mining Journal,  “Anniversary of Emancipation.” 27 September, 1879, p. 3

Editor’s Note (1):

Special thanks to reference library and archivist Elizabeth Howe of the Western Maryland Room of the Washington County Free Library for the research support.

Editor’s Note (2):

I have been invited to present on “Frederick Douglass in Western Maryland” at the October 1, 2018 meeting of the Maryland Commission on African American History and Culture.

Due to a previous commitment I will be unable to present but have made arrangements for the information to be presented on behalf of W Street Douglassonians.

Public Meeting

Monday, October 1, 2018 at 11:00 AM (Washington County)

Hagerstown Community College

111400 Robinwood Drive

Career Programs Building Rooms 211 & 213

Hagerstown, MD 21742

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GATH on Dr. Frederick Douglass: “Fred. Douglass comes from the Eastern Shore of Maryland, and has a good oystery nature about him. He opens up well.” (1872)

Townsend & Twain

Townsend on the left, Twain in the middle.

Street journalists stick together today as they have forever.

As the most radical journalist birthed in America Dr. Frederick (Bailey) Douglass ran with fellow street journalists.

Although largely forgotten today, George Alfred Townsend was a fellow Eastern Shoreman who ran alongside Editor Douglass and within similar circles of radical Reconstruction Washington City journalists.

For decades GATH tracked and chronicled America’s Pharaoh. GATH shared a mutual affection for the naturalism of Chesapeake Country with Dr. Douglass.

They corresponded. GATH stepped through Cedar Hill.

As radical journalists and Eastern Shoremen Gath and Dr. Douglass were brothers in ink and tidewater.

In late 1872, following the re-election of Republican President Grant over challenger, radical newspaperman and Liberal Republican, Horace Greeley, GATH dropped some words that were circulated throughout the country.


Fred. Douglass and Langston are set down in the papers as not loving each other overmuch. This Langston is an unreliable, nearly-white fellow, with considerable ability at phrase making and much sense. He is ever lasting in search of office, and Douglass, who is a well-ordered man, with a round head, is reported to have gone to President Grant and snubbed Langston’s aspirations.

Langston’s notion was that the colored race should have some Cabinet position, because it had voted for Grant, and he had constructed himself into the representative of the colored race as aforesaid.

Douglass had sense enough to know that color is a pretty mean qualification, except for matrimony, and that Langston would make a donkey of himself in whatever position he could get.

Fred. Douglass comes from the Eastern Shore of Maryland, and has a good oystery nature about him. He opens up well.


SOURCE:

Muller, John. The Lion of Anacostia (Blog), “GATH on Dr. Frederick Douglass: Fred. Douglass comes from the Eastern Shore of Maryland, and has a good oystery nature about him. He opens up well.” 14 September, 2018

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A proclamation from Old Ana Douglassonians; “Fred. Douglass’ Family History.” foreshadows return of Frederick Douglass to the Eastern Shore (The Comet, April 16, 1877, copied)

Whereas Old Ana Douglassonians are enlisted in the Army of Pharaoh Frederick (Bailey) Douglass to uplift fallen history and lost scholarship it is incumbent upon any and all endeavoring historians to honor and respect the guardianship of family members and kinfolk of the focus of their research when, where and how possible.

On trusted authority we have word that lauded “Tubman historian” Kate Larson is not only a disgrace to her mentorship by legendary Tubman expert John Creighton but on publication of her book she betrayed basic human decency and scholarly fidelity in refusing to provide a complimentary copy of her thievery of John Creighton’s work to the Ross-Tubman family.

In the continued advancing of lost scholarship many research pursuits are currently engaged.

A select Douglassonian Vigilant Research Society, also known as Pharaoh’s Army, are collaborating to correct the myths and end the exploitation of Dr. Douglass. This work will take years, generations.

The trusted family of Douglassonian scholars is very limited and it is hereby therefore the continued mission and stated founding purpose to include the Douglass Family and Bailey Tribe in all pursuant unknown scholarship.


In the existing scholarly telling of the multiple returns Pharaoh Douglass made to the Eastern Shore the foreshadowing reportage of a local paper out of the town of Saint Michaels, Maryland has gone ignored.

We are in possession of all new and known works of scholarship. We cannot recall the below news item, accounting for members of the Bailey Tribe living in St. Michaels and predicting a pending return visit, ever being published.

It is heretofore henceforth the exclusive scholarly provenance of the Douglassonian Vigilant Research Society.


The Comet (St. Michaels) _ Douglass Family History, reprint from Jasper Weekly (IND) 4.17.1877-page-001


Fred. Douglass’ Family History

The appointment of Frederick Douglass as United States Marshal of the District of Columbia revives some reminiscences of his career. The St. Michael’s (Md.) Comet says:

“He is well known as a native of this part of Talbot County; was raised here and lived chiefly here until he ran away and achieved his freedom. A sister of his married Peter Mitchell, who lives near St. Michael’s. Daniel Chancey’s wife is his niece. Douglass belonged to Mr. Hugh Auld, who lived in Baltimore, but his brother, Capt. Thomas Auld, had the management of him. The latter still lives, full of years and high in the regard of his fellow-men. Many are the changes that have taken place since “Fred,” was an intimate of his household.

Marshal Douglass intends to visit Talbot County, and especially St. Michael’s, at an early day. He has never been in the county since he was a slave.


SOURCE:

“Fred. Douglass Family History.” April 16, 1877

Copying and pasting of newspaper items from other journals — with attribution — was prevalent in the 19th century. A number of extant Mark Twain journalism from his time in Nevada is only known due this process as a complete collection of the Virginia City Territorial Enterprise is not yet known to exist.

This item was re-printed in a number of weeklies across the country. April 16 is the earliest we found its copying,

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Reported “mob” threat in Newark, New Jersey disputed by Rochester sheets, Dr. Frederick (Bailey) Douglass known for “preaching up a new rebellion” [September 1866]

With the bicentennial celebration sweeping across the country Rutgers University recently announced the naming of their sports field in Newark for Dr. Douglass.

According to a press release, “The Rutgers Board of Governors approved a resolution naming the athletics field at Rutgers University–Newark in honor of revered 19th century civil rights pioneer Frederick Douglass. The facility, used by Rutgers-Newark men’s and women’s Scarlet Raiders teams for NCAA Division III play and practice, as well as by numerous local community groups, will be known from now on as Frederick Douglass Field.”

With thousands of research notes yet published we often wait for the impetus to share a particular item. With the announcement by Rutgers University we share a brief item which may be of interest.


 

UA Sept 5, 1866 _ 3-1 _ lynch mob Newark

Local History and Genealogy Department of the Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County

Special dispatch to the Tribune.

 

PHILADELPHIA, Sept. 2.

A CONTEMPLATED ASSAULT ON FREDERICK DOUGLASS, ESQ., IN NEWARK.

During the stoppage at Newark of the train for Philadelphia with Fred. Douglass on board, squads from a crowd, which had been awaiting his coming, passed through the cars in search of him, shouting for “the damned [ni**ger].”

Mr. Douglass got through safely, however. Doubtless the mob was led to expect him by information sent them from New York.

Observe how minute and circumstantial! “The Mob” actually “passed through the cars shouting for the damned [ni**er].” “Information was sent to the mob from New York.” But after all “Mr. Douglass got through safely.”

The best part of the story is not told in the Tribune‘s special. Fred Douglass did not pass through Newark at all. It appears by written correspondence published in yesterday’s Union, that he went to Philadelphia by way of Pittsburgh. And it appears by this morning’s Democrat that at the very time when the Tribune says the Newark “mob were shouting for the damned ni**er,” Mr. Douglass was preaching up a new rebellion at North Collins, Erie Co., where he stopped on his way to Pittsburgh.

We quote a North Collins letter in that paper:

Frederick Douglass, who was present during a part of the three days of the meeting, stirred the hears of the vast concourse, by one of his thrilling and impressive efforts in oratory. He warned the people of the terrible crisis now impending. The nation had been basely betrayed, and was trembling on the brink of another rebellion, far more dangerous than the preceding one, because it would now have all the prestige of the government to sustain it.

So instead of “the damned [ni**er]” being set upon by a “Copperhead mob,” the individual thus described by the Tribune was at that very time engaged in getting up “another rebellion which would have all the prestige of the Government to sustain it.” But before we let our indignation get the better of our judgement over this Newark case, let us ask precisely how there can be “another rebellion” which will “have all the prestige of THE GOVERNMENT to sustain it!”

What kind of a “rebellion” will it be? Against whom will it be directed – having “all the prestige of the Government” on its side?

SOURCE:

Union and Advertiser (Rochester), September 5, 1866, p. 3

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“Five Hundred Years Hence Rochester’s Chief Title to Historic Fame Will be The Fact That It Was the Home of Douglass,” [“Fred. Douglass – Insincerity of the Radicals.” Union and Advertiser, August 25, 1866]

As the Bicentennial marches on I have ventured afield from W Street SE across the Chesapeake to the Shore, up the road to Baltimore and further north to Rochester, New York to do what little I can to uplift fallen and unknown history.

To say the least, the largely indifferent attitude I have encountered in contemporary Rochester to the history of Douglass in that city seems to be the continuation of a longstanding history of indifference.

Without further editorializing or ado …


UA Ag 25 1866 3-2_Rochester 500 years from now

Local History and Genealogy Department of the Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County

Fred. Douglass – Insincerity of the Radicals.


“Five hundred years hence,” said Thompson the noted English agitator in Corinthian Hall some fifteen years ago – “five hundred years hence Rochester’s chief title to historic fame will be the fact that it was the home of Douglass.”

Yet while such is the high appreciation of Fred. Douglass by the Radicals and Abolitionists of foreign lands, the Radicals of Rochester regard him in no other light than a tool to be used to get votes for the “white trash” who control the Radical party, and carry off its officers and its honors.

Five hundred years hence, who will hear of the Elys and the Harris and the Parsonses – the men who take all the desirable places at the disposal of the party and shove Douglass aside.

The Radical party profess to go for Political Equality between Blacks and Whites. They propose to force Negro Equality upon the South at any cost – even that of another Civil War, if milder “persuasives” prove unavailing. But, while they hold that attitude before this country and the whole Christian world, they practically repudiate their avowed principles here where they have the power and the opportunity to assert them, and to illustrate their devotion to the Black race, by doing honor to its most distinguished representative.

Frederick Douglass is unquestionably a man of a higher order of talent. His moral character is unimpeachable. His is in our judgement the ablest and most accomplished man which the Black and mixed races have produced on this continent. If any man of his color ever was or ever will be entitles to a seat in Congress and full recognition of his Equality with the White race, assuredly he is that man.

Here he is, in a District overwhelmingly “Black Republican:” yet he is denied a nomination to Congress; denied a seat in the Radical State Convention; denied a seat in the Radical Conventions to nominate candidates for Congress and other offices, and turned off with the empty honor of going to Philadelphia to make votes for the “white trash” whom the Radicals of the District select for every really desirable place.

Will not the Tribune and Independent rebuke their fellow-partisans here their selfishness and insincerity?

Will they compare the sentiments of Mr. Hart, as set forth in his own language in another article, with the treatment of Mr. Douglass by Mr. Hart and his friends, and tell their readers what they think of such arrant hypocrisy and imposture?

SOURCE:

“Fred. Douglass – Insincerity of the Radicals.” Union and Advertiser, August 25, 1866, p. 3.

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