Posts Tagged newspaper boys

Dr. Frederick (Bailey) Douglass, friend to the friendless street children of Washington City because he was once friendless in the streets of antebellum Fell’s Point, Baltimore Towne

Circulation of the street news of the passing of Honorable Frederick (Bailey) Douglass the evening of February 20, 1895 hit the hearts, minds and souls of Black American newspaper boys with lifelong lasting impact and repercussions.

Oral histories and records confirm upon Crosby Noyes conversating with a crestfallen integrated group of newsies, advocacy of Washington’s Black citizens and admiration of Evening Star editors a special commemorative edition of the paper was printed to recognize the life of Frederick Douglass and his tireless contributions to Washington City and his country from local corners to the world’s greatest stages as an honored guest of legislative, presidential and diplomatic heads of states for a half-century.

Upon distribution of the special edition white newspaper boys reportedly gave their special copies to their fellow Black American brothers-in-news satchels to vend out of a measure of respect for their mutual friend.

Historians have uniformly ignored questions of with whom and how Dr. Douglass carried himself on the corners.

Coming up mentored by an intricate collective of Black American Revolutionary War Patriots on the Tuckahoe and Black American Defenders of Baltimore in a pre-Industrial age Dr. Douglass knew what it is running the streets from his own days of running the streets.

During annual Emancipation Day parades Dr. Douglass was known to walk among the junior cadets and drum corps, knowing many of the young participant’s parents and grand-parents.

Having never attended a formal day of school in his life Dr. Douglass knew the first generation of Black American founders and presidents of universities and institutions of higher learning since they were kids.

Evening Star_1886 _ FD lecture Free Night Schools-page-001

Copyright of research strictly enforced by the United States Copyright Office; Library of Congress. Authority of Old Anacostia Douglassonians.

Today the legacy and lessons of Dr. Douglass abide to the school children in every school house in America and throughout classrooms of freedom-loving peoples of the civilized world.

Dr. Douglass continues to reach and teach the children across geography and nationality.

Why and how is this?

It was said of Dr. Douglass there was no better friend to the orphan and the friendless. With regularity and deliberateness Dr. Douglass lectured to benefit night schools, alms hours, orphanages, churches, community centers, relief funds, camp meetings and all manners of charitable efforts organized and led by Black Americans.   

Although now known and venerated with statues the world over, Frederick Bailey was once a friendless youngblood adolescent whom Black American Revolutionary War Patriots, AME ministers, Justices of the Peace, Point Boys and the Black Defenders of Baltimore especially looked out for and protected.  

During his sojourns on foot throughout Washington Dr. Douglass returned the benevolence he received from the streets to the streets. 

More than a century later these streets guard, preserve and recognize the lost history quiet as kept.

If you don’t know come down to the streets of indigenous Douglassonian communities and ask somebody as we have. 

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