Posts Tagged Lloyd Lowndes

“When Frederick Douglass Came To Town,”by Cassie Conklin of The Bottom Line [ April 14, 2019] (independent student news organization of Frostburg State University since 1948)

Image may contain: 1 personOn Tuesday, April 9, 2019, the FSU’s Department of Sociology, Department of Geography and African American Studies Program hosted a presentation by John Muller. Muller, a self-described “street historian,” has authored two books, “Frederick Douglass in Washington, D.C.: The Lion of Anacostia” and “Mark Twain in Washington, D.C.: The Adventures of a Capital Correspondent” and is working on “Lost History: Frederick (Bailey) Douglass in Baltimore City, 1825–1895.”

His lecture described visits made by Frederick Douglass, the famous escaped slave, orator, and intellectual, to Frostburg and Cumberland, Md. in the 1800’s. Muller also discussed friends and political acquaintances of Douglass’ from Western Maryland. One such associate, Lloyd Lowndes of Cumberland, later became governor of Maryland from 1896 to 1900 and was honored on FSU’s campus with the naming of Lowndes Hall.

Born in 1818 in Talbot County, Md., Frederick Douglass escaped slavery in 183[8]. He became famous in 1845 with the publication of his memoir, “Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.” The autobiography is considered one of the most influential pieces of literature to fuel the abolitionist movement of the 19th century in the United States. In his lifetime, Douglass became the first African American nominated for the Vice President of the United States on the Equal Rights Party ticket.

Muller’s presentation focused on the later years of Douglass’ life. In September 1879, Douglass traveled by train from Washington D.C. to Cumberland, Md. to give his “Self-Made Man” speech. This was not Douglass’ first contact in Allegany County, though, as he had written Letters to the Editor published in the Cumberland News in 1874. Nonetheless, the visit was an occasion shared by a mixed race audience. During his remarks, Douglass said, “I remember when it was not thought safe for me to have appeared among the mountains of Maryland.” The Frostburg Mining Journal covered the story saying, “Frostburg was fully represented.”

Douglass’ second visit to Allegany County was in March 1882 in support of the local African Methodist Episcopal Church in Frostburg. His second visit created less fanfare but was an intimate experience for attendees. The Frostburg Mining Journal wrote later that the lecture was given to a “small but intelligent audience…it was one of the best ever delivered in this town.”

Muller took questions from the over one hundred students, faculty, and staff present for his lecture. Many asked about the controversial nature of the relationship between Frederick Douglass and white women suffragettes. Muller impressively described the relationship between Douglass and Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, both of which had critiques about the 15th amendment that allowed for the voting rights of African-American men. Muller was careful in his answers saying, “Frederick Douglass took incremental steps to advocate for women’s voting rights whenever possible.”


When Frederick Douglass Came To Town,” April 14, 2019. Cassie Conklin. The Bottom Line. 

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“Lost History: Frederick Douglass in Western Maryland” [Frostburg State University – April 9, 2019 @ 6PM]

Frostburg State UniversityLost History: Frederick Douglass in Western Maryland


TUESDAY, April 9, 2019 – 6:00 PM

 ** Frostburg State University **
CCIT Building, Room 317
101 BRADDOCK ROAD
FROSTBURG, MARYLAND 21532

Dr. Frederick Douglass may have self-identified as an Eastern Shore man but on more than one occasion he spoke in the mountains of Western Maryland.

While in 1879 Douglass spoke in Frederick City (early April), Hagerstown (late April) and in Cumberland on September 22 for Emancipation Day festivities, in March 1882 Douglass made an independent visit to lecture in Frostburg, Maryland. Originally founded as Normal School No. 2, Frostburg State University was not initially funded and opened to its first class for nearly two decades.

Author and street historian John Muller will detail the visits of Dr. Douglass to Cumberland and Frostburg, as well as share insights into his relationship with Cumberland-based Governor Lloyd Lowndes.

Douglass often lectured at courthouses, as he did in Hagerstown, local city halls, as he did in Frederick City, and outdoor venues such as the fairgrounds in Cumberland. He also often lectured at well-known public halls, including opera houses, as he did in Frostburg.

Join local history enthusiasts and community leaders for a debut presentation detailing a previously unknown high-profile visit Dr. Douglass made to Cumberland, Maryland, arriving by train, escorted through town by a large procession and speaking at the old fairgrounds in company of local AME pastors, politicians and community leaders.

Following the presentation will be a Q&A.


Featured Presenter

John Muller is the author of Frederick Douglass in Washington, D.C: The Lion of Anacostia (2012) and Mark Twain in Washington, D.C.: The Adventures of a Capital Correspondent (2013) and is currently at work on Lost History: Frederick (Bailey) Douglass in Baltimore City, 1825 – 1895. Muller has presented at the Library of Congress, American Library of Paris, Politics and Prose, Newseum and other venues. He has been featured on C-SPAN, WAMU, WYPR, WDVM and other local and national media outlets

In the past year Muller has presented a series of lost history lectures in Cambridge, Maryland at the Harriet Tubman Museum and Education Center, Hagerstown at the Washington County Central Library and Ebenezer AME Church, Denton at the Caroline County Public Library and in Baltimore City at the Enoch Pratt Central Library.


Invited Elected Officials, Community Leaders and Organizations

Invitations have been extended to Cumberland Mayor Raymond Morris and members of the Cumberland City Council, Frostburg Mayor W. Robert Flanigan and members of the Frostburg City Council, Allegany County Commissioners, members of the Maryland House of Delegates and Maryland Senate representing Western Maryland, the office of United States Representative David Trone, United States Senators Benjamin Cardin and Chris Van Hollen, Allegany County Historical Society, Allegany Museum, Allegany County Chamber of Commerce, Allegany County Public Library, Allegany County Chapter of the NAACP, Metropolitan AME Church of Cumberland, African-American Historical Association of Western Maryland, Frostburg State University Black Student Alliance, Maryland Commission on African-American History and Culture, Maryland Historical Society, Frederick Douglass National Historic Site, Howard University’s Moorland-Spingarn Research Center, University of Maryland-College Park, W Street Douglassonians, members of the Douglass and Bailey Family and others.


Frostburg State University  

 The lecture is open to the public and being presented with the support and partnership of the Department of Sociology, Department of Geography and Department of African-American Studies. The lecture will be in the Catherine R. Gira Center for Communications and Information Technology Building, Room 317.

For directions visit https://www.frostburg.edu/university-directories.php

For more information on Frostburg State University visit https://www.frostburg.edu/ or call 301-687-7589.


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Directory of Army Correspondents Memorial includes two friends of Dr. Frederick Douglass — Governor Lloyd Lowndes and George Alfred Townsend

GATHLAND _ War Correspondent's Memorial Arch - Lloyd Lowndes

Photo by William Alston-El

Editor’s Note:

Dr. Douglass knew both George Alfred Townsend and Governor Lloyd Lowndes for more than twenty years.

While editor of the New National Era in Washington City Douglass and Townsend traveled in the same circles, sharing space in the press galleries of the Congress and Senate in the early 1870s. GATH often wrote about Douglass for publication and corresponded privately.

I have yet to share information which further details the friendship between GATH and Douglass and I am withholding information which details the friendship between Douglass and Lloyd Lowndes for disclosure at upcoming presentations.

The War Correspondent’s Memorial was unveiled in September 1896, more than a year and half after the death of Frederick Douglass.

Dr. Douglass name is not included. Why?

Could it be that Douglass was a “War Editor”? Could it be that Douglass was technically more of a recruiter than an editor during the Civil War?

I pose these questions not as indictment on GATH but simply in the journalistic tradition of getting in folk business.

Additionally, Thomas Morris Chester, who dined at Cedar Hill and is credited as being the lone (or one of the very select few) African-American war correspondent to write for a major daily newspaper, is not included among the names of correspondents.

Our research team will look into this.

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Marshal Frederick Douglass takes express train to Cumberland’s Queen City hotel; lectures for Emancipation celebration [Washington Post, Sept. 24, 1879 & Baltimore Sun, Sept. 23, 1879]

Queen_city_hotel _ Cumberland _ US Dept of Interior

Queen City Hotel
Cumberland, Maryland


FRED DOUGLASS IN CUMBERLAND

He is Received by the Authorities and Delivers an Address

Special Dispatch to The Post.

Cumberland, MD., Sept. 23. – “Emancipation Day” was yesterday celebrated in this city in a very enthusiastic manner by the colored people, who flocked to the city in large numbers from the neighboring towns of Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Maryland. It was a gala day for the colored race.

About 2,000 visitors were in town, and the streets presented an animated appearance. The weather was cloudy but no rain fell, and everything went off pleasantly. About noon a procession was formed, which passed through the principal streets and wended its way to the Fair grounds, which are located in a commanding position to the east of the city. Several Masonic and other secret societies appeared in line. Marshal Douglass arrived on the express train from Washington at 2:10 P.M.

He was met at the Queen City hotel by an immense crowd of people, and escorted through the principal streets in a barouche, in which were seated Mayor William J. Read, Hon. Henry W. Hoffman, and Rev. B. H. Lee, the pastor of the A.M.E. Church in this city, who was also the president of the meeting. The procession arrived at the Fair grounds at 3 o’clock, escorted by a band of music. Among the vast assemblage present were Hons. George A Pearre, associate judge of this circuit, composed of Garrett, Allegany and Washington counties; Lloyd Lowndes, Wm. Walsh, R.D. Johnson, Esq., a prominent Democrat, A. Hunter Boyd, Esq., the State’s attorney of Allegany county, and a number of prominent citizens, including several ladies. The meeting was called to order by Rev. B.H. Lee, the chairman, who introduced Marshal Douglass. He spoke for two hours in a very eloquent manner.


Celebration of Emancipation Day at Cumberland.

[Special Dispatch to the Baltimore Sun.]

Cumberland, MD., Sept. 22. – The colored citizens of Cumberland celebrated the anniversary of emancipation to-day. The attendance from abroad was not so large as expected there being only about 250 colored strangers in the city. Those at home turned out well and showed great interest, many houses being decorated. There was a procession at 12 o’clock, in which were the Laboring Sons, Star Club, Union League Club, and Frederick Douglass club. There were also three wagons containing tableaus representing war, emancipation, trades, professions, and industrial and mechanical pursuits. The display was creditable. At 12:30 the visitors took dinner at the fair grounds. United States Marshal Fred Douglass arrived at 2:10 P.M., and was met at the depot by a large crowd of both races, the desire to see him being general. At 2:30 o’clock exercises were had at the fair grounds consisting of prayer by Rev. T. W. Harris and addresses by United States Marshal Douglass and Hon. W. W. Hoffman. The attendance at the fair grounds was good, and Mr. Douglass’s speech was listened to with great attention.

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