Posts Tagged Harriet Tubman Museum and Educational Center

Douglassonian muralist Michael Rosato paints new Harriet Tubman mural in Cambridge City (Dorchester County, Eastern Shore Maryland)

Image may contain: 1 person, standing


Love and respect to our dear friends Mr. Jarmon & Mr. Pinder uplifting history across the bridge in Cambridge City.

Mr. Michael Rosato is a Douglassonian muralist. His work in East New Market (Dorchester County, Maryland) is one of the most honorific and dignified murals of Dr. Frederick Douglass that can be found throughout the four corners of the world.

Maryland Eastern Shore
DelMarva Diplomacy


We are so excited to see this new mural of Harriet Tubman coming to life! The mural is on the exterior of the Harriet Tubman Museum & Education Center in downtown Cambridge, Maryland. Nationally known muralist Michael Rosato, who lives here in Dorchester County, where Tubman was born, calls this work “Take My Hand,” which shows her “reaching through the wall as if beckoning the viewer to take her hand and join her on a journey to freedom…”

Stop by the museum at 424 Race Street to watch the progress on the mural over the next few weeks. We’ll also be posting updates here!

Thanks to Fishing Creek Barber & Honey Bee Trading for capturing this photo and letting us share it. (This lovely shop and barber shop is located a few steps from the mural, so stop in and check it out.)

[Courtesy of Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway]

, , ,

Leave a comment

CALL FOR PROPOSALS for Annual Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Conference

Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad ConferenceProposals for workshops are being accepted until February 4, 2019 for this year’s Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Conference, which will be held May 31 through June 1, 2019 in Cambridge, MD — a few miles from where Harriet Tubman once lived. This year’s theme, “It Ran on Faith,” describes Harriet’s approach to her life, as well as those who worked in secret, helping others to freedom.

This conference invites historians, students, educators, researchers, genealogists, artists and others to share and compare, interpret and celebrate this story based on family, freedom, community and faith. They are seeking proposals related to the realities and complexities of slavery, escapes and those who made escapes possible with an undercurrent of faith.

Workshop sessions by individuals or groups should be one hour in length. All programming benefits from audience interaction. Proposals should include the title and type of the presentation. Presenter information needed includes name, organization, email, phone number and mailing address. A short bio and photo should be included in presenter’s submission.

The presentation must be explained by describing the topic/theme in 300 words or less. The intended audience and technology requirements must also be included.

All of this can be emailed to tubman.conference@gmail.com.

For more information, email or call 410-228-7953.

, , , ,

Leave a comment

John Creighton discusses politics of formation of Harriet Tubman National Historic Site in Maryland [Lost Tapes of Choptank Regional History Discussion Group, February 2010]


“It started with there going to be a national park up there [Auburn, New York] because they have the buildings. And it’s all under the control of the AME Zion Church. And the hope was there would be a partnership worked out between the AME Zion Church and the National Park Service.

And for political reasons, you’d almost have to say, Maryland was necessary to help them to do what they wanted, at the same time the tourism office here want to do something from a state level and before long, like top seed, it grew into something that no one had quite envisioned.

How there would be a national historical park in two totally different spots 500 miles away from each other

So we don’t want to dwell on all that, we’re just saying that’s part of the history of this bill.

It was a coup for the Maryland Tourism Office to get Maryland to have an equal status without any building at all related to Harriet Tubman.

Nobody knows any building she walked in here, there is no artifact that’s known to be linked to her here. So it was a coup for them to do that. Yeah, that’s a good point.”


 

Editor’s Note:

As Talbot County readies for the public meeting process to discuss, plan, organize and coordinate the formation of the Frederick Douglass Park on the Tuckahoe I would encourage folks to study up, specifically the work of Dr. Creighton.

If you don’t know, ask somebody. Specifically, ask the duplicitous New Englander Kate Clifford Larson who not only “stole” Dr. Creighton’s research, according to a variety of sources on the ground, but engendered near universal indignation within the entire indigenous community of black folk and white folk.

I would encourage officials at the national, state and local level to heed the advice and counsel of Dr. Creighton.

, , , , ,

Leave a comment

Debut: Walking Tour of Frederick Douglass in Cambridge, Maryland [December 22, 10:30 am; tickets $15]

Lost History _ Frederick Douglass in Cambridge (flyer) _ crop

Did you know that Frederick Douglass was born in the next county over from where Harriet Tubman was born on Maryland’s Eastern Shore?

Recently some interesting history about Douglass’s visits to Cambridge, MD, has been rediscovered, and on Dec. 22, you can join the Walking Tour of Frederick Douglass in Cambridge. The tour retraces the steps that Douglass took during two visits to Cambridge in 1877 and 1878, and includes two stops along the Tubman Byway (Sites #3 and #4). This year marks 200 years since Douglass’s birth.

The tour, which runs from 10:30am to 12pm, is led by John Muller, historian and author of “Frederick Douglass in Washington, D.C.: The Lion of Anacostia.” Tickets cost $15.

Find details and buy tickets.

Cambridge is also home to the Harriet Tubman Museum & Educational Center, and about 20 minutes by auto from the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitor Center.

, ,

Leave a comment

Delmarva Public Radio & WHCP Radio -> “Lost History: Frederick Douglass in Cambridge, Maryland”

 


 

— DELMARVA PUBLIC RADIO —

This year marks the 200th anniversary of the birth of Fredrick Douglass.  John Muller, author of Fredrick Douglass in Washington, D.C.: The Lion of Anacostia, talks with Don Rush about Douglass’ life.

http://www.delmarvapublicradio.net/post/delmarva-today-10-12-2018


 

This year marks the 200th anniversary of the birth of Fredrick Douglass. Local Eastern Shore historian Linda Duyer taks with Don Rush about Douglass’ life.

http://www.delmarvapublicradio.net/post/delmarva-today-10-05-2018

, , , , ,

Leave a comment

Star Democrat, “Douglass visited Cambridge” [Print edition, September 26, 2018; front page & p. 11]

Frederick Douglass visited Cambridge, researchers say

Photo by Jack Rodgers, Star Democrat

Douglass visited Cambridge, researchers say

Story by: Jack Rodgers

CAMBRIDGE — The Harriet Tubman Museum hosted two speakers Sept. 21, who spoke about newly found evidence that Frederick Douglass visited Cambridge in 1877.

Linda Duyer, a local Eastern Shore historian and John Muller, author of Frederick Douglass in Washington, D.C: The Lion of Anacostia, both talked about their findings Friday, which point to a Douglass visit.

“We found it to be an extraordinary visit in a number of ways,” Duyer said. “This was a much more exciting visit.”

Duyer said Douglass came to Cambridge by steamboat overnight on Sept. 22, 1877, arriving in the early morning. Douglass was accompanied by John Mercer Langston, abolitionist and U.S. ambassador to Haiti.

The pair left from Long Wharf traveling up High Street, making arrangements to stay at the Cambridge Hotel. At that time, the hotel was on the northwest side of High Street, and was eventually moved to the other side, Duyer said.

Douglass and Langston then traveled to Bethel Church, where they were met by 400 to 500 people, Duyer said. Throughout their visit, Douglass and Langston were followed by bands as they walked through the area, she said.

Duyer said Douglass was not originally set to speak to the crowd, however, he ended up speaking for two hours. Douglass did not use a prepared speech, but spoke directly to both black and white audience members separately, she said.

“At one point he said, ‘Do a man a kindness and you will like him, do him an injury and you will hate him,’ which I thought was interesting,” Duyer said.

Duyer said the town commissioners also had invited Douglass to Cambridge in a proclamation, posted in a local publication. Douglass’ visit to Cambridge also came two months after his visit with his former slavemaster in the county.

Muller said Langston and Douglass had a complicated relationship, which at times may have been adversarial. This made their joint visit more unique, he said.

Muller said Douglass’ visit to Cambridge is groundbreaking and in some way changed his history.

“Frederick Douglass was an outlaw for justice and righteousness,” Muller said. “He was a very sought-after orator, writer and lecturer.”

LINK:

Douglass visited Cambridge, researchers say


Editor’s Note:

I will be presenting at the Union United Methodist Church on Saturday, October 20 at the invitation of the St. Michael’s Museum and at the Easton Branch of the Talbot County Free Library on Thursday, November 1.

See you soon.

JM

, , , ,

Leave a comment

Thank you to Cambridge, Maryland for uplifting lost history of Dr. Frederick (Bailey) Douglass

Thank you to Linda Duyer, Mr. Pinder, Mr. Jarmon, Mr. and Mrs. Green of Tubman Tours, the Harriet Tubman Organization, WHCP, Star Democrat and all who attended the presentation on Frederick Douglass in Cambridge, Maryland this past Friday evening.

Hope to see you soon!

Image may contain: 7 people, people sitting

Image may contain: 6 people, people sitting, living room and indoor

Photos: Linda Duyer

, , ,

Leave a comment