Posts Tagged Haiti

“Haiti and Frederick Douglass Across Generations & Geography” – May 23, 2020 3PM – 5PM @ Sankofa Books; 2714 Georgia Avenue, Washington D.C.

Haiti & FD _ Sankofa _ May 23 2020 _ flyer


Enjoy an afternoon of history and discussion at the locally respected and internationally known Sankofa Video Books & Café on Georgia Avenue, across the street from Howard University in Washington, D.C.

Dual presentations will be offered by author and historians John Muller & Frantz Derenoncourt, Jr. discussing Dr. Frederick Douglass as a student of Haitian history, U.S. Minister to Haiti and the impact of the Haitian Revolution on Douglass, in which he drew inspiration and invoked throughout his life on the public stage.

Travel from pre-industrial Baltimore City, where a young Frederick Bailey first learned of François-Dominique Toussaint Louverture from Afro-Haitian refugees on their way to school in his neighborhood, to the appointment of Frederick Douglass by President Grant to the Santo Domingo Commission to Paris, where Douglass developed friendships with Afro-Haitians, to the service of Minister Douglass to Haiti during the administrations of Haitian President Florvil Hyppolite and American President Benjamin Harrison to the 1893 World’s Exposition in Chicago where Douglass presided at the Haitian Pavilion.

— Seating will be available on a first come basis —


**FEATURED PRESENTERS**

Frantz Derenoncourt Jr. is the author of several books on Haitian history and the owner of Thorbred Books. Derenoncourt lectures widely to schools, community groups and professional organizations.

John Muller is the author of Frederick Douglass in Washington, D.C.: The Lion of Anacostia (2012) and is currently at work on a book on Douglass and the Eastern Shore of Maryland.


For more information on Sankofa visit:

https://www.events.sankofa.com/


Sankofa is located across the street from the Howard Business School, minutes away from the historic U Street and Shaw neighborhoods.

Metrorai: Petworth, U Street, Columbia Heights and Shaw-Howard are located approximately .8 miles away.

Buses: 70 & 79 offer convenient stops nearby.


RSVP HERE 

— FREE — 

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BBC In Our Time: 20/20 Frederick Douglass featuring Celeste-Marie Bernier, Karen Salt, and Nicholas Guyatt; interview by Melvyn Bragg


Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the life and ideas of Frederick Douglass, who was born into slavery in Maryland in 1818 and, once he had escaped, became one of that century’s most prominent abolitionists. He was such a good orator, his opponents doubted his story, but he told it in grim detail in 1845 in his book ‘Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave.’

He went on to address huge audiences in Great Britain and Ireland and there some of his supporters paid off his owner, so Douglass could be free in law and not fear recapture. After the Civil War and the abolition of slavery, he campaigned for equal rights for African-Americans, arguing against those such as Lincoln who had wanted freed slaves to leave America and found a colony elsewhere. “We were born here,” he said, “and here we will remain.”

With Celeste-Marie Bernier, Professor of Black Studies in the English Department at the University of Edinburgh; Karen Salt, Assistant Professor in Transnational American Studies at the University of Nottingham; and Nicholas Guyatt, Reader in North American History at the University of Cambridge.

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State Department Lecture: Ebenezer Bassett and Frederick Douglass, African American Leaders in American Diplomacy (February 14, 2018, 12pm to 1:30pm @ United States Diplomacy Center)

In recognition of African American History Month and the bicentennial of Frederick Douglass’s birthday, please join the United States Diplomacy Center for a special program exploring the diplomatic careers of two 19th century prominent African Americans who served as U.S. ministers to Haiti: Ebenezer Bassett, America’s first African American diplomat, and Frederick Douglass, abolitionist, writer, activist, civil servant, and diplomat.

Christopher Teal, U.S. Foreign Service Officer and author of Hero of Hispaniola: America’s First Black Diplomat, Ebenezer D. Bassett, will discuss his current project, a documentary on Bassett, after a screening of the upcoming film.

Dr. Ka’mal McClarin, Curator at the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site, National Park Service, lends insight into Douglass’s little-known diplomatic career. Several artifacts belonging to Douglass during his time in Haiti will be on display.

African American Pioneer Diplomats: Ebenezer Bassett and Frederick Douglass

 

RSVP required; register using the link: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfwyK2wfoBzCxE3O6IMrzVbjFPRV8F_VrivY_l6XO9r6epY-Q/viewform

*Bring a government issued photo ID/RSVP required/Seating is limited

**Professors/teachers may use their own email when registering students.

United States Diplomacy Center, U.S. Department of State

330 21st Street NW

Washington, DC 20006

METRO: Foggy Bottom (Blue, Orange and Silver)

Editor’s Note:

The Life and Times of Ebenezer Bassett
Educational Resources (37 pages) [PDF]

Biography (28 pages) [PDF]

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Metropolitan A.M.E. Church presents Frederick Douglass with Bible before departing to Haiti [Cleveland Gazette, September 7, 1889]

Library of Congress

Cleveland Gazette, September 7, 1889

“The members of the Metropolitan A.M.E. Church of Washington, D.C. presented Frederick Douglass a Bible last Sunday morning after the pastor, Rev. J. G. Mitchell, formerly of Ohio, had finished up his special sermon relating to Douglass’ ability and labor. He and his son Lewis worship at this church.”

Soon thereafter receiving the Bible Douglass would depart the country to present his credentials in Haiti as President Harrison’s U.S. minister resident and consul general, Republic of Haiti, and charge’ d’affaires, Santo Domingo.

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