Posts Tagged H.A. Griswold

Photos of Frederick Douglass mural walking tour of Old Anacostia

Earlier this month I had the opportunity to guide students from the Head-Royce School in Oakland, California enrolled in a selective social justice program visiting the nation’s capital on a walking tour of Old Anacostia.

Organized by Envoys, an international organization that works with innovative schools and teachers to expand the boundaries of possibility for global education programming, an intellectually curious and well-informed group of young men and women rendezvoused at the Anacostia Metro station. We then proceeded to review a number of murals before entering the boundaries of the Historic Anacostia replete with a variety of Frederick Douglass-themed murals.

Special thanks to the students and teachers of the Head-Royce School, Envoys program leaders and local community leaders within Anacostia who took time to offer their welcome and hospitality.


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Students examine an 1880 letter Frederick Douglass wrote in support of his friend Henry Griswold, a local real estate developer in Old Anacostia.


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Students view mural of Frederick Douglass and President Lincoln around the corner from the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site.


 

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Students from Oakland, California and their chaperones stand outside a mural of Frederick Douglass in Old Anacostia outside of D.C. Market.


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Following the tour students shared a meal and discussion at the new Busboys and Poets around the corner from the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site.

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Walking Tour of Frederick Douglass’s Anacostia June 8 & June 22, 11am – 12:30pm

Photo by DaJonna Richardson.

Photo by DaJonna Richardson.

As the weather in Washington warms join local historian and author John Muller for a walking tour of Old Anacostia to explore the history of the city’s first suburb and the late 19th century stomping grounds of Frederick Douglass.

We will meet at the visitor’s center of the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site (1411 W Street SE) and then ascend to the summit of Cedar Hill, the estate where Douglass spent the last 18 years of his life, and take in panoramic views of the capital city skyline. You will learn stories of Douglass’s professional and personal undertakings there, including his controversial second marriage, his service as United States Marshal, and his mentorship of a younger generation of activists. We will then descend into Historic Anacostia and explore the history, the homes, churches and sights that still remain, bringing forgotten historical characters to life such as Lingarn B. Anderson who followed up on reports of John Wilkes Booth’s presence in Uniontown, Henry A. Griswold who with a group of investors that included Douglass brought the streetcar to Anacostia, and other prominent men and women of 19th century Uniontown.

Everyone will be provided a copy of an 1887 map of the neighborhood and I will share historic photos to provide perspective and a frame of reference.

Tours are $25. Dates are June 8th 11am – 12:30pm & June 22nd 11am – 12:30pm. To reserve a place visit SideTour at http://www.sidetour.com/experiences/discover-the-fascinating-life-of-frederick-douglass-in-dc.

Look forward to seeing you soon!

Here’s what others are saying…

“John Muller served as an excellent and knowledgeable guide for our inquisitive group. Muller gave us a very thoroughly research approach to our tour with 19th century and early 20th century photographs depicting Anacostia or “Uniontown”, as it once was called.”  – Nancy Olds, photographer & journalist at the Civil War News

“John is an incredibly knowledgeable leader, just bursting with fabulous information. He guided the tour well and made sure everyone was able to hear.” – Dr. Jack Lowe

“But he’s also clearly an expert on Anacostia, as well; as a reporter with years of experience covering the area, he knows Anacostia inside and out. As he walked us through the area, he was greeted by name by a dozen residents, who obviously knew and liked him. That kind of familiarity with the neighborhood cannot be overvalued, and it made the tour a fascinating mix of Anacostia’s past and its present. I couldn’t recommend his tour more highly!” – Kenlyn McGrew

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SideTour of old Anacostia as seen and known by Frederick Douglass; January 19, 2013 & February 2, 2013

14th & W Street - 1930s _ FDNHSThis Saturday, January 19, 2013, I will be conducting my first SideTour of old Anacostia as seen and known by Frederick Douglass. There are only four spots left! The next tour will be Saturday, February 2, 2013.

We will meet at the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site (1411 W Street SE) and then ascend to the summit of Cedar Hill, the estate where Douglass spent the last 18 years of his life, and take in its majestic views of the capital. I will share stories of Douglass’s professional and personal undertakings there, including his controversial second marriage, his service as United States Marshal, and his mentorship of a younger generation of activists. We will then descend into Anacostia and explore the history of the homes and sights that still remain, bringing forgotten historical characters to life such as Lingarn B. Anderson and Henry A. Griswold.

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While Civil War still going on, Robert F. Martin appointed local postmaster of Uniontown

LOC FDP

Nearly one-hundred and fifty years ago there was a hotel and a post office in Uniontown. Today, there’s no post office or hotel within Historic Anacostia.

According to Arthur Hecht’s extensive research into the history of the postal service in the city for the Washington Philatelic Society, Anacostia’s first post office was established on February 6, 1849. It was discontinued on December 3, 1855 and then reestablished less than three months later on February 26, 1856.

The name was formally changed from Anacostia to Uniontown on March 9, 1856 and then changed back to Anacostia on February 8, 1869. (I need to consult another set of notes but the name change from Uniontown to Anacostia is reflected in the Congressional Record.) The post office in Anacostia was then discontinued on July 31, 1900.

Among Anacostia’s Postmasters were Robert F. Martin (appointed March 9, 1865), Henry A. Griswold (appointed October 31, 1881), and George Pyles (appointed twice), and Julias Tolson (appointed November 6, 1894). According to Hecht the annual compensation was $25 in 1865, $66 in 1867, $40 in 1869, and $80 in 1871.

In the Baltimore Sun’Washington Letter” column from March 13, 1865 it was announced that Robert F. Martin was appointed postmaster.

“A post office has just been established by the Postmaster General at what is called Uniontown, Washington county, D.C., with Mr. Robert F. Martin as postmaster. The location of this town is immediately opposite the Washington navy yard, on the east side of the Anacostia River, at the termination of the bridge and being near to Giesboro’, the great cavalry and quarmaster’s depot, the post office there will be of great advantage to the large number of mechanics and other workmen, soldiers, & c., there stationed.

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view of US Capitol Dome from old Griswold’s subdivision

Summer 2011

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