Posts Tagged FD Bicentennial

Frederick Douglass’ 200th Birthday Celebration at Highland Beach — Saturday, April 7, 2018

Image from our friend Jay Roberts and his visit to Highland Beach.

Renowned abolitionist Frederick Douglass (1818-1895) transformed himself from a Maryland slave to an international spokesman for racial justice. Near the end of his life, he planned to retire at a newly built summer cottage in Highland Beach near Annapolis, MD. His legacy and his family’s involvement at Highland Beach created an incorporated African American town that continues to thrive until this day. Come and explore this extraordinary community together with other Fulbright members!

The agenda includes:

  • Tour of the Frederick Douglass home, museum and the neighborhood
  • Short film on the history of Highland Beach
  • Panel discussion and a featured talk by Dr. Lawrence Jackson, Fulbright scholar and Bloomberg Distinguished Professor of English and History at Johns Hopkins University.

The Birthday Celebration will be held at the Frederick Douglass Home and Museum and Highland Beach Town Hall (about 35 miles from Downtown DC) and run from 1pm to 5pm. 

NOTE: A shuttle bus from Union Station to Annapolis will be available for up to 23 participants for an additional $5. It will leave Union Station promptly at 11:30am and return riders there after the event.

For more information and tickets — HERE!

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Tarence Bailey, Grahams Alley Douglassonian of Easton, Maryland, connects with W Street Douglassonians of Old Anacostia

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Tarence Bailey, an original Grahams Alley Douglassonian from Easton, Maryland in Talbot County, Maryland, native soul of the ancestral African Bailey Tribe.

On Sunday, March 18, 2018 in the year of the Frederick Douglass Bicentennial Mr. Tarence Bailey (US Army, Ret.), whose grandfather (5x) Perry Bailey was the older brother of Dr. Frederick (Bailey) Douglass and who passed in 1880 on Cedar Hill, walked the streets of Old Anacostia to connect with local inhabitants and indigenous Douglassonians.

It is not any man, or woman, person or group who can hold the time and attention of young men on the corners by chopping up the math and science of American and African history.

Mr. Bailey shared some of his experiences growing up in Easton in the 1980s and early 1990s when the area was faced with similar challenges that face Anacostia, as well as a tour he took of the Wye Plantation where ancestors of his Tribe are buried in an unmarked mass slave grave that has been maintained for longer than this country has existed. History is not something in a history book or biography to Mr. Bailey.

No firm plans were yet made to unite the two villages but it is known among tribal leaders of Old Ana the Eastern Shore mutually respects and welcomes W Street Douglassonians for a visit across the Bay to the native soil that birthed the Sage of Anacostia and America’s Pharaoh, Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey.

Mr. Bailey shared some of the differences and similarities of Old Easton and Old Anacostia. His authority and ability to speak on history was respected and openly received. The history of the Bailey Tribe is the history of this country. The history of Mr. (Bailey) Douglass on Jefferson Street is the history of Old Ana. The history of Old Ana is the history of DC. The history of DC is the history of this country.

Young men at 16th & U and some of the older-younger guys at 16th & V spoke with Mr. Bailey and expressed mutual respect and admiration for the unique and sacred Douglassonian legacy the two communities have a shared responsibility to uphold and protect.

For the purposes of local lore and the year of the Bicentennial of Frederick Douglass’ Birth it was a historic and important day for the neighborhood of Old Anacostia to host Mr. Bailey.

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Tarence Bailey, Sr. accepts proclamation from Saint Michaels, Maryland town commission to honor Frederick Douglass Bicentennial Commission

Image may contain: 3 people, people smiling, people sitting and indoorA founder in his childhood of Grahams Alley Douglassonians out of Easton, Maryland in Talbot County, Maryland, Tarence Bailey (US Army, Ret.) accepting a proclamation from the town commission of St. Michaels, Maryland.

Taking a brief travel through Old Easton I must share there’s a feeling in the air similar to Old Anacostia.

Hope we can bring closer connection between the two respective communities of indigenous Douglassonians in coming months and throughout 2018.

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A Tribute to Gladys Parham @ Frederick Douglass National Historic Site (Saturday, March 10, 2 PM – 3:30 PM)

Image may contain: one or more peopleJoin the National Park Service and family and friends of Gladys Parham to learn about the last caretaker of Cedar Hill. Ms. Parham lived in the caretaker’s cottage behind Frederick Douglass’s historic house from 1949 to 1983.

A well-known community figure who cared deeply about preserving the home and legacy of Douglass, Ms. Parham played a significant role in saving Cedar Hill for the enjoyment and education of everybody.

This program will include reminiscences by Parham family and friends, as well as a reading of memories written by Gladys Parham in her final years serving as caretaker.

FACEBOOK Event Page HERE

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“Spread Southside Love” Frederick Douglass mural makes cover of March East of the River!

East-of-the-River-Magazine-March-2018-page-001Thank you Capital Community News and the editors of East of the River!

Paper will be distributed throughout the neighborhoods of Wards 7 & 8 Saturday, March 10, 2018.

Locations include DC Public Library branches, IHOP on Alabama Avenue, Anacostia Arts Center and the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site.

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MARCH 18 | SE COMMUNITY PICTURE DAY! — Spread and Show Southeast Love at 16th & W Street SE (Sunday, March 18, 2018 @ 1:30 pm)

Community+Picture+Day+with+FD+MuralJoin The Advoc8te and members of the community for a southeast community picture day in front of this new mural in Anacostia!

The Advoc8te will also have plenty of #SOUTHEASTLOVE signs on hand for everyone who comes out!

Let’s spread love and honor our new mural!

All are invited regardless of residency! Join us!

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Editor’s Note:

Thank you to local journalist Nikki Peele and local author Dr. Courtney Davis for leading this community gathering to Spread Southside Love!

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Foreign Press comes through el barrio de Anacostia to show love to señor Douglass! La Vanguardia: “El esclavo que cumplió 200 años: Estados Unidos celebra el bicentenario del carismático líder abolicionista negro Frederick Douglass”

LaVanguardia _ el barrio de Anacostia _ FD 200th - 2018El nombre del señor Frederick Douglass toca las campanas de un vecindario a otro en todo el país. Desde Anacostia hasta Barcelona, ​​el mundo reconoce la importancia de Douglass para los pueblos amantes de la libertad en todas partes.

Agradecemos a la señorita Beatriz Navarro del periódico La Vanguardia por su generoso informe sobre el cumpleaños número dos centenario del abolicionista reconocido internacionalmente y padre fundador del Movimiento por los Derechos Civiles de los Estados Unidos.

United States celebrates the bicentennial of the charismatic black abolitionist leader Frederick Douglass

When Frederick August Washington Bailey came into the world, no one expected one day to celebrate his birthday. “Most of the slaves know as little of their age as the horses of theirs,” he would write years later in his autobiography. Two hundred years later, the United States pays tribute to one of its most important leaders, a slave who escaped his destiny to become a charismatic abolitionist leader, writer, speaker and civil rights activist and women in particular. He was photographed more than President Abraham Lincoln himself.

Reborn as Frederick Douglass, he chose his date of birth on February 14, because his mother, the few times he saw him, told him it was “his Valentine.” He was born a slave in Maryland in 1818 and raised with his maternal grandmother. At the age of eight, he was taken to work on a plantation and, later, in a shipyard in Baltimore, where he learned to read and write on his own. At age 20, he managed to escape using the papers of a black sailor to get on a train and go north, an adventure that was for a long time a secret so as not to harm those who helped him. His flight was due “more to good luck than to bravery,” he explained years later.

He adopted the surname Douglass, married a freed slave in New York, and settled in Massachusetts. There he began to frequent the circuit of abolitionist politicians, whom he impressed with his story of the horrors of slavery and his oratory skills. In 1845 he published the first of his three autobiographies, a best seller that made him fear being caught. He took refuge in England and Ireland, where he dealt with Daniel O’Connell, until two years later some followers bought his freedom for 150 pounds and returned to the US. as a free man.

Douglass immediately understood the power of the image and posed frequently for portraits, in which he presented himself as whites, elegantly dressed and in an attitude of work. It retains more original images of him than Lincoln, which has earned him the title of “most photographed American of the nineteenth century.” He traveled throughout the country, directed a newspaper that he used as a platform for his ideas and pressured Lincoln to allow blacks to fight for the Union in the civil war. After the abolition of slavery, he dedicated himself to “the most difficult battle,” the struggle for equal rights.

Between 1871 and 1891, he held various public offices, including minister for Haiti (he was the first African-American confirmed for an official appointment by the Senate). In 1876 he became marshal of Washington DC (head of the local police) and settled in the neighborhood of Anacostia, today one of the poorest. The house, Cedar Hill, became a hotbed of political activity. Today a Douglass double greets visitors at the door who come to know the place where the iconic leader ended his days in 1895, married in second marriage with a white one.

Donald Trump disconcerted the country a few months ago by talking about Douglass as if he were alive: “It is an example of someone who has done an amazing job and who is being recognized more and more,” he said. Trump’s blunder is “representative of the lack of general knowledge of the country about the significance of this historical figure,” says John Muller,” author of a biography of Douglass (The Lion of Anacostia),”but it is welcome if it helps that the people pay more attention.” The bicentennial, he says, has a special meaning in the current political context but “it makes no sense to think about what Douglass would have thought or said.”

Ascribed to the Republicans, no one disputes his legacy but his figure is sometimes the object of a dispute between conservatives and democrats, who disagree about how religious or patriotic he might be, given his sharp criticisms of the country, especially before the abolition of slavery. “As a people, Americans know very well all the facts that favor them,” he said in 1852. Some consider this a national trait, perhaps a national weakness. It is a fact that everything that enriches his reputation and is easy to find, will be found by the Americans.”

Editor’s Note:

Translation provided by Google Translate. Original article in Spanish available HERE!

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Yale University’s Panel Discussion – Frederick Douglass at 200: The Life Behind the Times [February 16, 2018]

Event press release

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New Frederick Douglass books being published in 2018 [March update]

No automatic alt text available.A number of new Douglass books have already been published in the first two months of 2018 and more are expected throughout the year.

Here’s a brief list:

Frederick Douglass: America’s Prophet
D.H. Dilbeck
Pub Date: February 14, 2018

From his enslavement to freedom, Frederick Douglass was one of America’s most extraordinary champions of liberty and equality. Throughout his long life, Douglass was also a man of profound religious conviction. In this concise and original biography, D. H. Dilbeck offers a provocative interpretation of Douglass’s life through the lens of his faith. In an era when the role of religion in public life is as contentious as ever, Dilbeck provides essential new perspective on Douglass’s place in American history.

Douglass came to faith as a teenager among African American Methodists in Baltimore. For the rest of his life, he adhered to a distinctly prophetic Christianity. Imitating the ancient Hebrew prophets and Jesus Christ, Douglass boldly condemned evil and oppression, especially when committed by the powerful. Dilbeck shows how Douglass’s prophetic Christianity provided purpose and unity to his wide-ranging work as an author, editor, orator, and reformer. As “America’s Prophet,” Douglass exposed his nation’s moral failures and hypocrisies in the hopes of creating a more just society. He admonished his fellow Americans to truly abide by the political and religious ideals they professed to hold most dear. Two hundred years after his birth, Douglass’s prophetic voice remains as timely as ever.

The Frederick Douglass Papers: Series Three: Correspondence, Volume 2: 1853-1865
Frederick Douglass (Author)
Pub Date: April 24, 2018

The second collection of meticulously edited correspondence with abolitionist, author, statesman, and former slave Frederick Douglass covers the years leading up to the Civil War through the close of the conflict, offering readers an illuminating portrait of an extraordinary American and the turbulent times in which he lived. An important contribution to historical scholarship, the documents offer fascinating insights into the abolitionist movement during wartime and the author’s relationship to Abraham Lincoln and other prominent figures of the era.

If I Survive: Frederick Douglass and Family in the Walter O. Evans Collection
Celeste-Marie Bernier (Author),‎ Andrew Taylor (Author)
Pub Date: September 1, 2018

  • Over 60 previously unpublished speeches, letters and autobiographies and over 20 photographs and prints (many unseen) of Frederick Douglass and his sons from the Walter O. Evans collection.
  • The first extensive study of Frederick Douglass and his family’s fight for the cause of liberty during the Civil War and in the Post-Emancipation era
    The first scholarly annotated transcriptions of these previously unpublished materials
  • In-depth individual chronologies mapping the life stories of Frederick Douglass and his sons, Lewis Henry, Frederick Jr., and Charles Remond Douglass

This book consists of a 100,000 word research monograph and 60,000 words of original manuscript facsimile pages as accompanied by edited transcriptions and scholarly notes. This volume will benefit the reader by publishing the previously unseen letters, essays, and photographs of Frederick Douglass and his sons, Charles Remond and Lewis Henry Douglass, held in the Walter O. Evans collection. A first for specialist researchers in the fields of US history/ Slavery Studies/ African American Studies/ American Studies/ Transatlantic Studies as well as for general audiences interested in the lives and works of a legendary US historical figure, this scholarly edition will consist of an introduction followed by annotated facsimile reproductions of the writings of Douglass and his sons who not only fought in the Civil War but were civil rights campaigners and political activists. While there were many Frederick Douglasses to fit every era – Douglass the fugitive slave, Douglass the antislavery orator, Douglass the autobiographer, Douglass the statesman, and Douglass the transatlantic reformer – this book breaks new ground by shedding light on Douglass the family man.

Pictures and Power: Imaging and Imagining Frederick Douglass 1818-2018
Edited by Celeste-Marie Bernier and Bill E. Lawson
Pub Date: December 11, 2017

Pictures and Power: Imaging and Imagining Frederick Douglass 1818-2018 is the result of decades of collaborations and conversations among academics, artists, and activists living and working in the UK and the US. For the first time, contributors map Douglass’ eclectic and experimental visual archive across an array of aesthetic, social, political, cultural, historical, ideological, and philosophical contexts. While Douglass the activist, diplomat, statesman, politician, autobiographer, orator, essayist, historian, memoirist, correspondent, and philosopher have been the focus of a scholarly industry over the decades, Douglass the art historian and the subject of photographs, paintings, prints, and sculpture let alone mass visual culture has only begun to be explored. Across this volume, scholars share their groundbreaking research investigating Douglass’ significance as the subject of visual culture and as himself a self-reflexive image-maker and radical theorist. Pictures and Power has come to life from a conviction endorsed by Douglass himself: the battleground against slavery and the fight for equal rights had many staging grounds and was by no means restricted to the plantation, the antislavery podium, the legal court, the stump circuit, the campaign trail, or even the educational institution but rather bled through every arena of imaginative, political and artistic life.

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Thank you to Carter G. Woodson Home National Historic Site for hosting presentation on Frederick Douglass and Howard University!

Photos by Douglassonian Eric Zhang

Ranger Danielle, a student at Howard University, welcomes visitors to Sunday’s lecture. 

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