Posts Tagged Emancipation Day

Dr. Frederick (Bailey) Douglass, friend to the friendless street children of Washington City because he was once friendless in the streets of antebellum Fell’s Point, Baltimore Towne

Circulation of the street news of the passing of Honorable Frederick (Bailey) Douglass the evening of February 20, 1895 hit the hearts, minds and souls of Black American newspaper boys with lifelong lasting impact and repercussions.

Oral histories and records confirm upon Crosby Noyes conversating with a crestfallen integrated group of newsies, advocacy of Washington’s Black citizens and admiration of Evening Star editors a special commemorative edition of the paper was printed to recognize the life of Frederick Douglass and his tireless contributions to Washington City and his country from local corners to the world’s greatest stages as an honored guest of legislative, presidential and diplomatic heads of states for a half-century.

Upon distribution of the special edition white newspaper boys reportedly gave their special copies to their fellow Black American brothers-in-news satchels to vend out of a measure of respect for their mutual friend.

Historians have uniformly ignored questions of with whom and how Dr. Douglass carried himself on the corners.

Coming up mentored by an intricate collective of Black American Revolutionary War Patriots on the Tuckahoe and Black American Defenders of Baltimore in a pre-Industrial age Dr. Douglass knew what it is running the streets from his own days of running the streets.

During annual Emancipation Day parades Dr. Douglass was known to walk among the junior cadets and drum corps, knowing many of the young participant’s parents and grand-parents.

Having never attended a formal day of school in his life Dr. Douglass knew the first generation of Black American founders and presidents of universities and institutions of higher learning since they were kids.

Evening Star_1886 _ FD lecture Free Night Schools-page-001

Copyright of research strictly enforced by the United States Copyright Office; Library of Congress. Authority of Old Anacostia Douglassonians.

Today the legacy and lessons of Dr. Douglass abide to the school children in every school house in America and throughout classrooms of freedom-loving peoples of the civilized world.

Dr. Douglass continues to reach and teach the children across geography and nationality.

Why and how is this?

It was said of Dr. Douglass there was no better friend to the orphan and the friendless. With regularity and deliberateness Dr. Douglass lectured to benefit night schools, alms hours, orphanages, churches, community centers, relief funds, camp meetings and all manners of charitable efforts organized and led by Black Americans.   

Although now known and venerated with statues the world over, Frederick Bailey was once a friendless youngblood adolescent whom Black American Revolutionary War Patriots, AME ministers, Justices of the Peace, Point Boys and the Black Defenders of Baltimore especially looked out for and protected.  

During his sojourns on foot throughout Washington Dr. Douglass returned the benevolence he received from the streets to the streets. 

More than a century later these streets guard, preserve and recognize the lost history quiet as kept.

If you don’t know come down to the streets of indigenous Douglassonian communities and ask somebody as we have. 

, , , , ,

Leave a comment

Washington Bee publishes pamphlet of DC Emancipation Day speeches of Hon. Dr. Frederick Douglass [1886]

Image result for william calvin chaseIn the twilight of a public career spanning more than a half-century, as one of the last old world abolitionist newspapermen breathing, Dr. Frederick Douglass took it upon himself to mentor a quarrelsome younger generation of correspondents and editors of the colored press that vacillated between admiration and antipathy for the former runaway fugitive slave editor.

Of the most pugnacious and confrontational voices within the leading class of Reconstruction journalists of the “colored press” Douglass embraced was native Washingtonian William Calvin Chase, Esq., publisher of the weekly Washington Bee from 1882 until his death in 1921.

Douglass and Chase had countless public disagreements over national and local politics, including the evolution of rival factions in the 1880s over the annual April celebration of Washington City’s Emancipation Day. Some years two parades would occur.

Not part of the modern mythomania advanced by Douglass scholars is the support Douglass directly and indirectly contributed to veterans organizations, relief associations, orphanages, churches, colleges, night schools and the local press, female press and black press during his more than a quarter-century of public life in Washington City.

Don’t believe the dishonorable and shameful lies of the disgraceful scandalmongering David Blight.

Since William Calvin Chase is not among the living to eviscerate Blight’s Pulitzer I will embrace the mandate as a contributing correspondent of Washington City’s modern black press corps.

The extra necessary seriousness of history today is due the extra necessary seriousness of properly and scholastically recognizing and uplifting the history and story of yesterday.

Get your pamphlets up. Study your lessons.

No mercy nor pardon will be afforded.

JM
 -


JUST OUT.

FOUR GREAT SPEECHES

-OF-

HON. FRED. DOUGLASS.

The people of this country who desire to read the four great speeches of Hon. Fred. Douglass in pamphlet form can obtain them by sending 30 cents in postage stamps. The pamphlet will contain the Louisville speech, and the three great speeches delivered in this city April 16th, ’84, April 16th, ’85, April 16th, ’86.

The occasions being the anniversaries of the Emancipation of Slaves in the District of Columbia. For 30 cents in postage stamps a pamphlet will be sent to any address in the United States. Or we will send a copy of the BEE for one year and Mr. Douglass speeches for $2.20 ets.

Address
W. CALVIN CHASE,
Editors of the Beee 1109 I st. n.w.
Washington, D.C.


, , , , ,

Leave a comment

Java Jolt Lecture: Frederick Douglass & Alexandria [September 20th, 10am]

Courtesy of National Park Service, FDNHS.

Courtesy of National Park Service, FDNHS.

Local historian Jay Roberts will discuss the little known visit Frederick Douglass made to Alexandria on September 24, 1894. Just five months before his death, Douglass – orator, statesmen, influential publisher, social reformer, and champion of civil rights – came to Alexandria. The occasion that brought “the Lion of Anacostia” to Virginia soil was the 31st anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. Learn more about this interesting event, sponsored by the Friends of Alexandria Archaeology (FOAA). Light refreshments

 

  • September 20, 2014 – September 20, 2014
  • Times: 10 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
  • Admission: Free!
  • Venue: Alexandria Archaeology
  • 105 North Union Street, #327
  • Alexandria VA 22314
  • Phone: 703-746-4399

, , , , , ,

Leave a comment