Posts Tagged Cedar Hill

New Bench at Frederick Douglass National Historic Site adds subtle touch to celebration of July 4th

new bench - long view walking towards back of grounds - 7.1.2018

A sacred bench was recently installed on the grounds of the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site, 1411 W Street SE, by Nature Sacred.

Days before the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site opened to the public for the Capitol Fireworks, and W Street SE Fireworks Show, for the first time in a generation, local horticulturalist Ron Ammon from Annapolis-based Nature Sacred devoted special attention to an overlooked small park on Cedar Hill’s sacred grounds.

new bench alongside old bench - FDNHS - 7.1.2018

New Bench (left). Old Bench, in a couple parts (right).

Years ago Open Spaces Sacred Places, now Nature Sacred, installed two benches in a gardened recreation space behind the parking lot. The rear bench, in an area shaded by extending foliage, had unfortunately weathered and succumbed to termites in recent years.

With an official heat index over 100 degrees Ron unloaded materials and tools from his white pick-up truck and got to work assembling a new sacred bench for the landscape of the Douglass family home.

new-bench-fdnhs-_-7-1-2018-ron-ammon.jpg

Ron Ammon of Nature Sacred alongside new bench at FDNHS.

In quick time Ron hauled and disposed of the old bench in the adjacent woods and moved the new bench into place. I accepted his invitation to take it on its first test-drive.

Ron also cut back dead branches of the nationally stricken Ash Tree, inspected the small foot bridge and generally cleaned up the park area.

Ron Ammon sitting on new bench w Journal of drawing of him - FDNHS - 7.1.2018

Ron Ammon alongside sketch of him by young artist.

A young artist visiting the Douglass home with her parents completed a sketch of Ron, a true W Street Douglassonian Naturalist, to show her appreciation for his industrious spirit.

We thank Ron, Nature Sacred and the TFK Foundation for the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site and all Douglassonian Naturalists from W Street SE and all parts of the world that visit the sacred grounds.

EDITOR’s Note:

W Street Douglassonians and local activists have been familiar with this organization for many years, including the installation of benches in Market Square nearly a decade ago.

A wonderful organization that helps communities heals from the outside by promoting nature’s impact and importance to everyday life.

 

Advertisements

, , , ,

Leave a comment

All-day activities planned for July 4, 2018 at Cedar Hill; open for first time in long time for grand view of fireworks on the National Mall

Frederick Douglass National Historic Site Presents 
“What to the slave is the Fourth of July?”

 View from Cedar Hill

Join the National Park Service on July 4, 2018, for a day of reflection and commemoration as we honor history and celebrate 200 years of the life and legacy of Frederick Douglass, the “Lion of Anacostia.”

Celebrate Independence Day starting at 9 a.m. with special activities at Douglass Cedar Hill estate in historic Anacostia, Washington D.C. Bring your blankets and a picnic to view the fireworks on the National Mall from Cedar Hill at 9:09 p.m.
All activities are FREE and open to the public.

TEXT JULY4DC TO 888-777 FOR ALERTS AND UPDATES

Plan Your Visit

9 a.m. Join us for ranger-led house tours given at 9 a.m., 10 a.m. and 10:15 a.m.

11 a.m. See actor Darius Wallace deliver Douglass famous speech “What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?” on the front porch of the house.

12 p.m. – 6 p.m. Journey on a self guided tour of the house with rangers in different rooms to answer questions. Tours will be on the first floor only.

1 p.m. – 5 p.m. Become a bicentennial Junior Ranger and earn a limited edition badge! Enjoy activities for children and families on the lawn. Croquet, rangers unrolling a replica of the 1877 American flag (1877 was the year Douglass moved to Cedar Hill), storytelling, and living history actors portraying Douglass and his family.

7 p.m. See an encore performance from actor Darius Wallace as he delivers Douglass’s “What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?” speech on the front porch of the house.

8 p.m. – 9 p.m. Enjoy a Fourth of July themed full orchestra concert by D.C. Strings on the front porch of Douglass’s Cedar Hill home. Listen to music as you settle in to watch the fireworks.

9:09 p.m. Witness a grand view of the fireworks on the National Mall from Cedar Hill, just like Douglass would have. Enjoy music from D.C. Strings during the fireworks show.

Getting There

Parking: Street parking will be the only available parking for this event. The site is located in a residential neighborhood, parking will be difficult to find.

Public Transportation:

  • If taking a bus, get on the B2 to “Mt. Rainier” or “Bladensburg Rd., V St. NE,” or get on the V2 to “Minnesota Ave” or “Capitol Heights Station.” There is a bus stop directly in front of the site at the corner of W and 14th Streets.
  • The B2 and V2 buses service the corner of W and 14th Streets, directly in front of the site. The 90, 93, A42, A46, A48, P1, P2, and P6 all drop off within two blocks of the site.
  • Use the Green Line and get off at Anacostia Station. When disembarking the train, follow signs to exit the station on the “Howard Road” and “Buses” side. It is approximately 3/4 miles from the station to the site.
  • If walking, take a right on Howard Road (walk 1 block), take a left on Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue (walk 3 blocks), and take a right on W Street (walk 4 blocks to the site’s visitor center).
  • Visit WMATA for fares and route details.

Prohibited Items and Activities

  • All coolers, backpacks, packages, and persons may be subject to inspection.
  • No grills, alcohol, glass containers, or personal fireworks are permitted on National Park Service property.
  • Launching, landing or operating unmanned or remote controlled aircraft on National Park Service property is strictly prohibited.
  • Personal tents that block other visitors’ views and tents that require stakes are prohibited.
  • Possession of firearms in national parks is prohibited, governed by federal as well as local law.

, ,

Leave a comment

1st Day of Spring 2018 Brings Snow to Cedar Hill

Image may contain: snow, tree, plant, sky and outdoor

Photo by Soldier. W Street Douglassonians.

, ,

Leave a comment

Open Letter to Prof. David Blight: It’s not about you. It’s about the next generation of youngsters, those whose birthright is to know the Douglassonian tradition is theirs to inherit.

FDNHS_Neighborhood Children on Cedar Hill front porch _ March 2012

Young W Street Douglassonians on front porch of Cedar Hill

Prof. David W. Blight
Department of History
Yale University
320 York Street
New Haven, CT 06520-8324

My name is John Muller, author of Frederick Douglass in Washington, D.C.: The Lion of Anacostia (The History Press, 2012) which needs to be properly mentioned during your upcoming talks as the only existing book detailing Mr. Douglass’ largely unknown years in Washington City.

You know who I am.

When I first embarked upon writing my book in late 2011 I heard from many people you were at work on a biography on Mr. Douglass, which has still not been published all these years later. As a dutiful local historian and street reporter I sent you an email or two or three, along with a call, to let you know who I was and what I was endeavoring to do. I have the receipts.

As I moved forward with my research you were not particularly helpful or supportive of a young Douglassonian scholar. Other academics and “Douglass experts” were welcoming, helpful and offered assistance when I was trying to work through questions I had during the research process. The more I studied Mr. Douglass closely the more I realized how much of an abject mediocre scholar you are and which you remain today.

Mr. Douglass was for the youngsters, his whole life. He played baseball with neighborhood children at Cedar Hill. Students from Howard University were always welcome at Cedar Hill. You are a betrayal and disgrace to this Douglassonian tradition.

I told you I would catch you. I did.

At the unveiling of the Frederick Douglass statue at Emancipation Hall on July 19, 2013 I ran up on you. I told you, “I’m John Muller. You know who I am.”

You responded defensively that you’d read my book and offered it was “well written” or something such as that. I told you my interest was not your opinion of my book but your displaying a respect for the community of Anacostia, a place where the spirit and history of Mr. Douglass can be felt in the air at any time of the day, any day and any season of the year.

I invited you to attend my book talk at the Library of Congress’ Center for the Book happening the next day, July 20, 2013. You did not attend.

Additionally, I invited you to take one of my neighborhood walking tours of Anacostia while in town or during any of your subsequent visits to Washington City. To date you have never taken the walking tour. Other “Douglass scholars” have. They understand. You do not now nor have ever understood who Mr. Douglass was and is to Old Ana.

Since I am a self-taught 16th & W Street SE scholar you may continue to think you can dismiss me personally and the Douglass scholarship I have advanced for the past five years — which is far above and beyond the work you have done on Douglass during your entire time at Yale — along with having a continued blatant inattention of the neighborhood and community which I have been appointed as an ambassador for.

Your demonstrative disrespect and disregard for my scholarship is of no consequence other than to shine light on your intellectual and scholarly dishonesty but, my dear Prof. Blight, you WILL NOT ignore the neighborhood of Old Anacostia and the self-made and self-taught Douglassonian scholars who hold down the corners along 16th Street SE and W Street SE.

The men of Old Anacostia know more about Douglass and what his life means to the human condition than you, an intellectually dishonest, manipulative and selfish old white man could ever understand in 200 lifetimes, let alone 200 years.

The young men and elders of 16th Street SE respect, admire and honor Mr. Frederick Douglass as their neighbor and friend. Many men and women had their elementary school graduations at Cedar Hill. The history of Cedar Hill is the history of a neighborhood and its inhabitants protecting, guarding and preserving Mr. Douglass’ memory for generations so now people like you can safely genuflect and speculate. Understand that, sir.

As you are an alleged “Douglass expert,” whose career has been almost exclusively built as a white, European man discussing race and the history of black folk in this country it’s the least you could do to offer respect for the Asiatic community of Old Anacostia. But you show no respect. You are only about yourself and those within the Ivory Tower institutions who for decades have patted you on the back.

You show yourself to be a disgrace to the Douglassonian tradition at every turn and every word.

This past Wednesday, February 7, 2018, you spoke in Baltimore at the Maryland Historical Society. There were representatives from the Office of Governor Larry Hogan in attendance along with other luminaries.

When given this platform to discuss Mr. Douglass you peddled in your usual speculative history. More importantly, you did not acknowledge many things occurring around the Frederick Douglass Bicentennial you should have. It is not all about you, Prof. Blight. It’s about the heritage and legacy of Mr. Douglass and the younger generation.

The Frederick Douglass Family Initiatives is involved in ongoing effort to raise up One Million Abolitionists by distributing 1,000,000 special edition copies of The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave to school-aged children throughout the country.

You did not mention this important effort to your rapt audience. You did not mention members of the Douglass-Bailey family. You did not acknowledge anyone or anything other than yourself and your own perceived authority on Mr. Douglass.

It is not about you, sir. It is not about me. It is about honoring Mr. Douglass and passing on his legacy to the next generation.

As a youngster growing up in Maryland I read Narrative in junior high school. I had a poster of Mr. D on my wall throughout high school. When I began working for the UPO nearly a decade ago in the neighborhood where Cedar Hill is located I always thought there was a reason God deployed me to W Street SE.

In Baltimore, on W Street SE, in Rochester, in Talbot County, in Savannah, Georgia, at Howard University and anywhere and everywhere from the Tuckahoe to Paris to Egypt where the name Frederick Douglass rings the bells of the Gods of not only American History but the history of civilization you will understand it is about the younger generation. It is about liberation of mind, body and soul. It is about uplifting fallen humanity.

Don’t you ever say “Freddy D” out your mouth ever again, whether in private or in public in front of an audience of primarily aged Europeans.

You do not have that right and I am letting you know you do not have that right with the full force of all the founding members of 16th & W Street SE Douglassonians.

We have never seen you come around the way. Never.

As a history professor at one of the world’s most prestigious universities I invite you to come to the corner and have a discussion. Try to teach your speculative Douglass history and you will be taught what Mr. Douglass truly means to people in a way you can never understand.

You do not own Mr. Douglass and his memory. Nor do I. No one does. Mr. Douglass lived his life to uplift all of fallen humanity. Mr. D was a friend to the friendless.

For thirty years you have exerted unearned power and control over the history of Frederick Douglass in not just this country but the world. Many, many elite institutions are guilty of elevating your mediocrity to the level of honor, including Washington College.

You sir, are no honor to Douglass. You are a disgrace.

The point of this letter is to kindly suggest you mention the One Million Abolitionists project moving forward, especially during your appearance at the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site on the weekend of February 17 and February 18.

If you believe your self to be a Douglass scholar I’d kindly suggest you use the opportunities you’ve been given to uplift Douglass to the younger generation and the average man and woman in the community.

In conclusion, this is not about you, old man. It’s about uplifting and liberating the next generation of youngsters, those whose birthright is to know the Douglassonian tradition is theirs to inherit.

Respectfully,
John Muller
Co-Founder, 16th & W Street Douglassonians

1400 block of W Street SE
Old Anacostia
Washington, D.C.

jmuller.washingtonsyndicate@gmail.com
(202) 236-3413

, , , , ,

Leave a comment

Photo Archives: Mr. Donald E. Scoggins w/ members of FDMHA & HUD Secretary Patricia Roberts Harris

Don_with FDMHA and Secretary Patricia Roberts Harris

Mr. Donald E. Scoggins with members of FDMHA and HUD Secretary Patricia Roberts Harris. Courtesy of FDMHA.

As an outgrowth of the Frederick Douglass Community Conference held earlier this month we’ve made connection with Mr. Donald Scoggins, a former resident of W Street SE and active member of the Frederick Douglass Memorial and Historical Association.

At the community conference Mr. Scoggins shared details of how the 6th HUD Secretary, Patrica Roberts Harris, was able to assist the Frederick Memorial and Historical Association, chartered by Congress in 1900, re-acquire ownership of land that Frederick Douglass purchased behind his Cedar Hill Estate. In coming weeks we plan to have more about this little known chapter in the modern history of Frederick Douglass’ home.

We share this photo with his permission and blessing. Mr. Scoggins shared the circumstances of the photograph:

It was held just days of her confirmation when she announced selling to the Association for $1.00.00 with 100% Section 8 rental subsidies tied to the 152 unit garden apartment complex formerly known as Cedar Gardens. It had been acquired several years earlier by the federal government through foreclosure.

, , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

New Cedar Hill Mural in Old Anacostia

Cedar Hill mural_Ketcham ES_15th St

Photo by John Muller & William Alston-El. Copyright strictly enforced online and offline.

Throughout the greater countryside and the greater DC metropolitan area there are Douglass statues. Throughout Ward 8 there are a number of murals and depictions of Mr. Frederick Douglass. Some are well done, while some could use a little touch-up work.

The newest Douglass-related mural doesn’t depict the visage of the Lion of Anacostia, instead it depicts local children planting and watering a sapling in the front lawn of Cedar Hill, the home of Douglass from the fall of 1877 until his death in February 1895.

This expansive vertical mural spans three stories on the 15th Street SE side of Ketcham Elementary School, named for Union General, Congressman and District Commissioner John H. Ketcham.

On the top reads, “Planting roots now to grow strong later.”

On the bottom reads, “Once you learn to read, you will forever be free.” – Frederick Douglass

This mural is part of a larger and ongoing renovation and beautification of the school famous and revered among the streets and inhabitants of Old Anacostia.

The mural was completed by Joe Pagac from Tucson, Arizona. Ketcham ES entered into a contest on Twitter and was selected for the mural from the DC Mural Arts Program –> MuralsDC/DPW #Nominatemywall campaign
Cedar Hill mural __ Ketcham ES & Wash monument

Photo by John Muller & William Alston-El. Copyright is strictly enforced, online and offline.

 

, , , , ,

Leave a comment

Frederick Douglass letter for sale, $8,995 [FD to Magnus L. Robinson, 20 July, 1888]

FD to Magnus L Robinson _ 7.20.1888Occasionally original Douglass documents turn up on Ebay and other online auction sites. This letter is for sale for $8,995.00.

Here’s the description:

Autograph Letter Signed (ALS), “Fredk. Douglass,” one page on Cedar Hill letterhead, 5” x 8”, July 20, 1888. Letter to Magnus L. Robinson, an African-American journalist and newspaper editor.

In full: “I am very sorry that I cannot serve you. I have already taken an interest in the People’s Advocate and promised to press its claims upon the National Republican Committee otherwise I would be glad to serve the National Republican Leader.” In Fine condition, with uniform toning. Accompanied by a full letter of authenticity from PSA/DNA.

A month prior to writing this letter, Douglass attended the Republican National Convention to speak out in support of John Sherman for the presidency. With his primary focus on a strong civil rights platform, he did ultimately campaign for nominee Benjamin Harrison, after the latter supported an item calling for federal protection of black citizens’ voting rights. Interestingly, Douglass himself received a single vote for the presidential nomination while at the Convention—the first African-American to earn the distinction. Also of note are the two prominent African-American newspapers that Douglas mentions in this letter: Robinson’s The National Leader and John W. Cromwell’s The People’s Advocate. Having just been founded in January, Robinson’s paper was still getting off the ground, certainly his reason for reaching out to Douglass for support. A fantastic letter referring to the 1888 Republican National Convention, with significant content regarding the civil rights movement and the voice of the African-American community.

, , , , , ,

Leave a comment