Posts Tagged Caroline County

Thank you Caroline County Public Library for uplifting the lost local history of Dr. Frederick Douglass! (February 9, 2019)

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DENTON, Maryland (Caroline County):
February 9, 2019

On a weekend of competing interests for local Shore historians and Douglassonians with overlapping events happening in Cambridge and Annapolis, reportedly seventy people of all ages and nationalities huddled into the second-floor large meeting room of the Denton Branch Library to hear the debut presentation of “Lost History of Frederick Douglass in Caroline County” by John Muller, author Frederick Douglass in Washington, D.C.: The Lion of Anacostia.

With authorization from Old Anacostia Douglassonians and support from families with ancestral origins in Caroline County and the Eastern Shore before American Independence, the presentation provided an abbreviated introduction into the interconnectedness of the families of Anna Murray, Bishop Alexander Wayman, Frederick (Bailey) Douglass and Perry (Bailey) Downs.

Chronicled in contemporary newspapers in Washington, D.C., Baltimore, Delaware and the Eastern Shore, details of a previously unknown visit Dr. Douglass made to Caroline County were briefly shared.

Continuing to uplift the lost history of Frederick Douglass in Maryland with support of public libraries across the state, Muller will present “Lost History of Frederick Douglass in Western Maryland,” Tuesday, February 12 at the Fletcher Branch of the Washington County Library in downtown Hagerstown. On the evening of Thursday, February 28, Muller, along with Dr. Ida E. Jones, author and Morgan State University Archivist, will present “Lost History of Frederick (Bailey) Douglass in Baltimore” at the main branch of the Enoch Pratt Library in downtown Baltimore City.


— **SPECIAL THANKS** — 

Tara Coursey, Amanda Watson & Debbie Bennett (Caroline County Public Library)
Dr. Linda Duyer (Eastern Shore community historian, pending nomination as City Historian for Salisbury, Maryland)
Mrs. Robinson and the Greensboro Teen Activity Group
Eric Zhang, unofficial official photographer of the Frederick Douglass Bicentennial Celebration
Honorable Ken B. Morris, Jr., Chairman Professor Dale Glenwood Green, Honorable Tarence Bailey, Sr. (US Army, ret.)
Members of the Bailey, Coursey, Green, Murray and Wayman families
Becky Riti, Maryland Room; Easton Branch of Talbot County Free Library
Cassandra Vanhooser (Talbot County Economic Development and Tourism)
Ceres Bainbridge (Caroline County Office of Tourism)
Jim Dawson of Unicorn Bookshop
Star Democrat (Jack Rodgers, Dustin Holt and Abby Andrew)
Talbot Spy (Dave Whelan)
Master Historian John Creighton (Cambridge, Maryland)
Master Historian William Alston-El (Old Anacostia, SE Washington, DC.)
Dr. Ed Papenfuse, retired archivist of the state of Maryland
Frederick Douglass National Historic Site
16th & W Street Douglassonians
Choptank River Heritage (Don Barker)
Denton Town Councilwoman Doncella Wilson (Denton Fireflies)
Dedra Downes Hicks
Ridgely Historical Society, Greensboro Historical Society, Preston Historical Society and Caroline County Historical Society
St. Michaels Museum at St. Mary’s Square (Kate & Jeff Fones)
Dorchester County Historical Society
Secrets of the Eastern Shore
Harriet Tubman Museum and Educational Center (Bill Jarmon & Donald Pinder)

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Star Democrat: “Author John Muller to discuss Caroline County Frederick Douglass History” [A5, February 7, 2019]

Author John Muller to discuss Caroline County Frederick Douglass History
By JACK RODGERS jrodgers@chespub.com


DENTON — John Muller, author of Frederick Douglass in Washington, D.C.: The Lion of Anacostia, along with Denton Town Councilwoman Doncella Wilson will be discussing a previous unknown visit Douglass made to Denton.

flyer - fd in caroline county (feb 9, 2019) _ updated timeThe talk will be held at 1:30 p.m. Feb. 9 at the Caroline County Central Library in Denton.

Muller is known for producing a number of works, including Mark Twain in Washington, D.C.: The Adventures of a Capital Correspondent, and is currently working on Lost History: Frederick Douglass and Maryland’s Eastern Shore.

Muller will detail a visit made by Douglass, where he arrived by train before departing by boat to return to Washington, D.C., in late October 1883. Muller also said his research found that Douglass’ grandmother was well known in Denton for selling fishing nets.

“She was very entrepreneurial,” Muller said. “Douglass talks about, in his 1845 autobiography, his grandmother was known in the town of Denton for selling fishing nets. … Basically, today where the Denton steamboat wharf is.”

Muller said his series of talks, speaking last September about a previously undocumented visit by Douglass to Cambridge, are a way to bring lost history to residents.

“Overall, the history of Frederick Douglass post Civil War in the state of Maryland has not yet been told, recognized, acknowledged published — it’s been hidden,” Muller said. “The history of Frederick Douglass in the state of Maryland includes Hagerstown, Cumberland, Frostburg.”

Muller said documenting Douglass’ visits to the Eastern Shore, along with what he does during those visits, help researchers make inferences about his personality.
Muller said one inference he has made, through researching Douglass’ speeches on the Eastern Shore, was that he was highly politically motivated and vocal within the Republican party. Muller said after the Civil War, Douglass knew many influential state politicians running for office.

“Douglass was very involved in local politics in the state of Maryland without ever running for election himself,” Muller said. “He speaks at the courthouse, which I think is very significant because he spoke at at least four courthouses on the Eastern Shore.”

Muller said highlighting the history of Douglass in select counties around the Eastern Shore is part of finding lost history about his life. Muller said the bicentennial celebration of Douglass’ life has motivated him to find more history about his life.

“Douglass had a connection to Caroline County at a very, very young age and maintained that connection through mutual friends and correspondence and physical visits to Caroline County,” Muller said. “I think it was really a culmination of his life.”

For more information on upcoming events, presentations, walking tours and newly discovered research, visit https://thelionofanacostia.wordpress.com or www.facebook.com/LionOfAnacostia.

On Feb. 28, Muller will present “The Lost History of Frederick (Bailey) Douglass in Baltimore,” at the Enoch Pratt Central Library with Dr. Ida E. Jones, Morgan State University’s archivist.


Star Democrat _ 2.7.2019 _ Douglass visited Denton _ A5-page-001

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“LOST HISTORY: Frederick Douglass in Caroline County, Maryland” [Sat., February 9, 2019 – 1:30 PM @ Caroline County Central Library – Denton]

flyer - fd in caroline county (feb 9, 2019) _ updated time

LOST HISTORY:
Frederick Douglass in Caroline County, Maryland

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2019 – 1:30 PM to 3:00 PM

** CAROLINE COUNTY CENTRAL LIBRARY – DENTON **
100 MARKET STREET
DENTON, MARYLAND 21629

In recognition of the consequential Eastern Shore history of Dr. Frederick (Bailey) Douglass, a special presentation will be made on Saturday, February 9, 2019 at the Caroline County Central Library in Historic Denton, Maryland detailing a previously unknown visit Douglass made to Caroline County in the fall of 1883.

With the Frederick Douglass Bicentennial being celebrated and recognized throughout the country, and world, the local impact and significance of his life can often be overlooked. Based in Washington, D.C., local historian John Muller made headlines in the Star Democrat last September introducing and presenting research detailing previously unknown visits Douglass made to Cambridge in Dorchester County.

The subject of biographies and focus of manuscripts for generations, including Young Frederick Douglass: The Maryland Years by Eastern Shore historian Dickson J. Preston, the fuller and more complete story of Dr. Douglass on the Shore has yet to be told.

Join local history enthusiasts and community leaders for a debut presentation detailing a previously unknown high-profile visit Dr. Douglass made to Denton, Maryland, arriving by train, escorted through town by a brass band from Centreville, speaking at the old county courthouse and departing by boat.

Following the presentation will be a Q&A.

Featured Presenters

Denton Town Councilwoman Doncella Wilson, a native of Queen Anne’s County, will offer introductory remarks. Wilson is the founder of the FireFlies Denton, a community-based organization that recognizes outstanding youth and advocates, and serves in a variety of leadership roles and advocacy positions.

John Muller is the author of Frederick Douglass in Washington, D.C: The Lion of Anacostia (2012) and Mark Twain in Washington, D.C.: The Adventures of a Capital Correspondent (2013) and is at work on Lost History: Frederick Douglass and Maryland’s Eastern Shore. He will be presenting “The Lost History of Frederick Douglass in Western Maryland” at the Washington County Central Library in Hagerstown February 12, 2019 and “Lost History: Frederick (Bailey) Douglass in Baltimore” at the Enoch Pratt Central Library in Baltimore on February 28, 2019.

Invited Elected Officials, Community Leaders and Organizations

Invitations will be extended to Denton Mayor Abigail W. McNinch, members of the Denton Town Council, Caroline County Historical Society, Ridgley Historical Society, Maryland Commission on African-American History and Culture, Caroline County Office of Tourism, Caroline County Commissioners, elected officials within the Maryland State Senate and Maryland State Assembly representing Caroline County, Frederick Douglass National Historic Site, Howard University’s Moorland-Spingarn Research Center, University of Maryland-College Park, Salisbury University’s Edward H. Nabb Research Center, Dean of the Frederick Douglass Library at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway, Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitor Center, Maryland Humanities Council, National Museum of African-American History and Culture, Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum, members of the Douglass and Bailey Family and others.

CONTACT:

Tara Hill-Coursey
North County Branch Manager
thill-coursey@carolib.org / 410.482.2173

Caroline County Central Library – Denton

The Caroline County Central Library is located in downtown Denton at First and Market Street. The library is easily accessible by car from Easton, Cambridge, Baltimore and Washington, D.C with a parking lot behind the library and available street parking throughout Denton.

Denton, Maryland is the county seat of Caroline County, Maryland and includes stops on the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway.

For more information on the program and/or directions please call 410.479.1343 or visit http://www.carolib.org/.

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Upcoming presentations and talks on “Lost History of Frederick Douglass” (February – April 2019) across the entire state of Maryland from Baltimore to Denton to Hagerstown

*FEBRUARY*

Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 1 pm
Central Library – Denton, Caroline County Public Library
100 Market Street
Denton, MD 21629

Lost History of Frederick Douglass in Caroline County, Maryland

Following the discovery and presentation of the “Lost History of Frederick Douglass in Cambridge, Maryland,” local historian John Muller will present on the unknown history of Frederick Douglass in Caroline County.

Monday, February 11, 2019 
Sheraton Hotel
Alexandria, Virginia
Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States

“Frederick Douglass and the Lincoln Family”

Tuesday, February 12, 2019 at 7 pm
Hagerstown Central Branch, Washington County Free Library
100 South Potomac Street
Hagerstown, Maryland 21740

“Lost History of Frederick Douglass in Hagerstown, Maryland”

Frederick Douglass rose from the depths of slavery on Maryland’s Eastern Shore to travel three continents and counsel a half-dozen Presidents.

You may think you know his story but did you know Douglass visited Hagerstown?!

In 1879 Douglass took a train to “Hub City” where he delivered an address to benefit Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church. Future United States Congressman and United States Senator, Hagerstonian Louis E. McComas introduced Douglass before he spoke at the court house on Washington Street.

Hear historian and author John Muller share never before published details of Dr. Frederick Douglass’ visit to Hagerstown walking the community and lodging in the historic Washington House.

Saturday, February 16, 2019 at 2 pm
Ebenezer African Methodist Episcopal Church
26 Bethel Street
Hagerstown, Maryland 21740

“Lost History of Frederick Douglass in Western Maryland”

Using newly discovered information found in public and private archives, Muller will share information that uplifts the history of consequential visits Douglass made to Frederick City, Hagerstown and Cumberland, as well as lifelong associations Douglass had with abolitionists, politicians, and faith and community leaders of the Cumberland Valley region.

Saturday, February 23, 2019
Delaplaine Visual Arts Center
40 South Carroll Street
Frederick, Maryland 21701
Frederick County Historic Sites Consortium Yearly Master Docent Series Workshop 2019

Thursday, February 28, 2019 at 6:30 pm
Enoch Pratt Central Library, African American Department 
400 Cathedral Street
Baltimore, Maryland 21201

John Muller, author of Frederick Douglass in Washington, D.C.: The Lion of Anacostia and Mark Twain in Washington, D.C.: The Adventures of a Capital Correspondent, will present “The Lost History of Frederick (Bailey) Douglass in Baltimore” using newly discovered information found in the Baltimore City Archives, Maryland Historical Society, Enoch Pratt Free Library, and private archives. Muller has presented widely throughout the DC-Baltimore metropolitan area at venues including the Library of Congress, Newseum, Politics and Prose, American Library in Paris and local universities. He is currently working on a book about the lost history of Frederick Douglass on Maryland’s Eastern Shore.

John Muller will be in conversation with Dr. Ida E. Jones, Morgan State University archivist.

Writers LIVE programs are supported in part by a bequest from The Miss Howard Hubbard Adult Programming Fund. 


*APRIL*

Tuesday, April 6, 2019
Frostburg State University
Frostburg, Maryland
“Lost History of Frederick Douglass in Cumberland and Allegany County, Maryland”

Wednesday, April 24, 2019 at 7:00 pm
Woodlawn Manor Cultural Park
16501 Norwood Road
Sandy Spring, Maryland 20860

Image result for frederick douglass emily edmonsonHave you heard stories of Frederick Douglass stepping through the country roads of Brinklow and Sandy Spring?

According to oral tradition Dr. Douglass, an internationally known abolitionist, statesmen, orator and journalist, was known to visit multiple families in our area.

Emily Edmonson Johnson, born an enslaved person in Montgomery County and an escapee of the Pearl in 1848, was photographed with Frederick Douglass and other abolitionist at a convention to protest the 1850 Fugitive Slave Law. Following her education at Oberlin in Ohio and serving as a teacher at the Miner School in Washington, D.C., Edmonson married Larkin Johnson in the early 1860s and lived in the Sandy Spring community for nearly a decade. She later moved to Hillsdale in Washington, D.C., adjacent to Anacostia where her friend Frederick Douglass lived which is preserved as the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site.

Find out more about Frederick Douglass and his connections from Sharp Street Church to state politics in post-Civil War Maryland and unknown visits to communities from Cumberland to Cambridge.

Saturday, April 27, 2019
Porch Program at the Newcomer House
18422 Shepherdstown Pike
Keedysville, Maryland 21756

“Lost History of Frederick Douglass in Western Maryland”

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