Posts Tagged bookstores

Thank you Sankofa Books on Georgia Avenue NW for uplifting history of Frederick Douglass in Washington, D.C.

Sankofa Books on Georgia Avenue in NW Washington, D.C. adjacent to Howard University.

Adjacent to the campus of Howard University on Georgia Avenue NW Sankofa Books has been a gathering place for students, activists, community organizers, professors and street historians since the late 1990s.

As a youngster coming up taking the 70 bus it was not an ambition to one day have my own work of local history on Frederick Douglass displayed on the shelves of the Godmother of Washington City’s Pan-African and Afrocentric bookstores.

During a recent visit to Sankofa we connected with a legendary 7th Street historian and throne seat poet who is considering a localized work on Dr. Douglass in the mid-west.

Moving into the fall and winter we hope to begin a series which will look closer and more properly at the history of American Pharaoh Dr. Frederick (Bailey) Douglass and a variety of subjects currently being suppressed by diabolical Eurocentric thought and scandal-mongering.

As local street historians our responsibility is to uplift the scholarship and the humanity of its interpretation and discussion.

Gratitude and respect cannot be properly expressed in language to Sankofa Books for uplifting and recognizing the local history of Dr. Douglass and for being a diplomatic outpost for street scholars around the world of the Douglassonian Diaspora.

Thank you, Sankofa, Georgia Avenue and all late night students and historians on the back of the 70.


Editor’s Note:

It is an honor to be in company of fellow authors Master Historian C. R. Gibbs, Dr. Ida E. Jones, Archivist of Morgan State University, Jenny Masur of the D.C. Historical Studies Planning Committees of yesteryear and other colleagues, friends and mentors within the local Washington, D.C. / Baltimore history communities.

JM

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Frederick Douglass Bicentennial Banners throughout Fell’s Point; Greedy Reads bookstore at corner of South Ann & Aliceanna Streets maintains centuries-old tradition of radical booksellers

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Frederick Douglass Bicentennial Banner on Thames Street in Historic Fell’s Point, Baltimore.

Throughout stone streets and corners a juvenile Frederick Bailey hit running up against and with the Point Boys and Town Boys of 1820s and 1830s Baltimore dozens of commemorative banners affix light poles recognizing the bicentennial birth year of a local legend known throughout all four corners of the Earth.

Baltimore City Mayor Catherine Pugh and partnering organizations Living Classrooms at the Frederick Douglass-Isaac Myers Museum Maritime Museum and Park, Society for the Preservation of Federal Hill and Fell’s Point, Crossroads School and Morgan State Professor Dale Green of the Maryland Commission on African American History and Culture must be applauded and acknowledged for uplifting and elevating Dr. Frederick (Bailey) Douglass in such a proper and public way.

In the full spirit of celebration of Dr. Douglass we must also acknowledge his emergence as a lifelong bibliophile began during his time in Fell’s Point.

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Looking out the window of Greedy Reads bookstore at corner of South Ann & Aliceanna Streets.

Parlaying fifty cents earned from “blacking boots for some gentlemen” a defiant adolescent Frederick Bailey purchased The Colombian Orator from radical bookseller Nathaniel Knight’s shop at 28 Thames Street.

During our flâneur through Fell’s Point yesterday we stopped by Greedy Reeds, Fell’s Point only independent book store, at the corner of South Ann and Aliceanna Streets, a tilt Frederick Bailey passed going to and fro.

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Radical bookselling tradition still alive in Fell’s Point at Greedy Reads.

Julia, the proprietress of Greedy Reads, is a radical bookseller, keeping a local tradition alive that goes back centuries.

We thank all in Fell’s Point for elevating the history and the neighborhood.

We hope leaders within Washington City and the greater Old Anacostia neighborhood can follow the lead of our friends in Easton, Maryland in Talbot County and Fell’s Point by installing bicentennial banners of our own.

It is the least Washington City and Old Anacostia can do to show our respect and appreciation for all Dr. Douglass did for the neighborhood and the city and continues to do with the presence of his benevolent spirit.

JM

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