Posts Tagged books

“Agents Wanted” to sell “Frederick Douglass, The Orator” by Professor James Monroe Gregory (Richmond Planet, May 1895)

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“AGENTS WANTED”

 


 

SOURCE:

Richmond Planet, 04 May 1895, p. 3

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Douglass Bicentennial Book Discussion: “If I Survive” Thur., September 6 at 7 PM – 9 PM @ Frederick Douglass National Historic Site [1411 W Street SE]

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The National Park Service is still in the midst of its yearlong bicentennial birthday commemoration of Frederick Douglass. Many books, articles, and journals have been written on Douglass—the leading African American abolitionist, orator, and statesman of the nineteenth century. Historians and authors Celeste-Marie Bernier and Andrew Taylor have penned one of the newest books on Douglass entitled, “If I Survive: Frederick Douglass and Family in the Walter O. Evans Collection” published by Edinburgh University Press.

The book is a collection of 60 previously unpublished speeches, letters and autobiographies, in addition to over 20 photographs and prints (many unseen) of Frederick Douglass and his sons from the Walter O. Evans Collection. This is the first extensive study of the great abolitionist and his family’s fight for the cause of liberty during the Civil War and in the Post-Emancipation era, as well as the first scholarly annotated transcriptions of these previously unpublished materials.

We hope you can join us for this Book Discussion featuring authors Bernier and Taylor!

Copies of the book will also be available for purchase in the site bookstore.


This is the most important book in Douglassoniana Studies published in generations.

Peace Islam to my dear friend William Alston El.
He would be tickled.

The most important work of Douglassonian Studies published in the Bicentennial year of Frederick Douglass National Historic Site is published by our dear friend — our European friend — Prof. Bernie.

I carry it how I carry it because that is how I was taught to carry it.

We must recognize and acknowledge the importance of uplifting the truth of Dr. Frederick (Bailey) Douglass and his yet untold story.

It is an American story that spans the Caribbean nations and across three continents.

All these folks have it twisted and tangled.
Therefore whereas there is opportunity for yung scholars to rise up out of their communities and tell the untold story.

But there are no scholars. Just those running game.

This is no game.
This is not speculative anti-history.

This is annotated Douglassonian Studies.
Family letters, biographies, photos, etc.

Family First
The Douglasses can speak for themselves.

And if Americans have to have a European scholar enlighten us to the ignorance of our history then so be it.

How do you think we got Donald Trump?

Come through W Street.

Learn how to uplift fallen history that is long overdue for this country and empower yourself to take ownership of your own history.

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Simon and Schuster Copy Editor & Prof. David Blight: “There is no ‘Charleston’ in the state of Maryland.” [W Street Douglassonian copy edit of “Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom”]

Dear Simon and Schuster Copy Editor:

In reviewing an advanced copy of Prof. David W. Blight’s Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom I have come across a small, yet important and consequential, copy edit.

While there are “Charlestons” in nearly two dozen states naming towns, cities, counties and a state capital there is no Charleston in Maryland. There is a Charlestown (Cecil County) and Chestertown (Kent County).

If Prof. Blight is referencing a lost junction, town or city in Dorchester County I am unaware of its existence or its history.

I would kindly suggest the appropriate correction is made. Geographic accuracy and importance of place matters to the good people on the Shore and in Tubman Country.

Thank you for your time and attention.

Respectfully,

John Muller

author, Frederick Douglass in Washington, D.C.: The Lion of Anacostia

Old Anacostia Douglassonian


 

David Blight - error _ 8.22.2018

SOURCE:

Blight, David. W. Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom. Simon and Schuster, 2018.

p. 598, 2nd paragraph, 1st sentence


EDITOR’s Note:

I am not throwing stones from a glass house; I am lodging boulders from W Street in Old Anacostia.

As a local journalist, I go to great lengths to fact-check my stories to spell names and places correctly, as well to get the facts right.

In my book there is a copy error or two. It happens. I understand. Comes with the territory. For example, there is a mention of “Lewis Douglas” as Deputy Marshal when of course it is correctly “Lewis Douglass.” Additionally, I over-use the word intrepid in concurrent paragraphs.

However, I am neither a lauded professor at Yale University nor was my book published by one of the “Big Five.”

The expectation to get simple, rudimentary facts correct is not an unreasonable expectation.

I can only speak for myself but every inhabitant of Pine Street, Bucktown and “Pindertown” I have had the acquaintance of making knows in their sleep the city closely affiliated with Harriet Tubman is Cambridge.

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Author Talk: If I Survive The Frederick Douglass Family’s Struggle for Liberty | Reginald F. Lewis Museum (Wed., September 5, 2018 @ 6:30 pm)

Author Talk: If I Survive The Frederick Douglass Family’s Struggle for Liberty

Wednesday, September 5, 6:30pm

While there have been many public Frederick Douglasses – the abolitionist, the statesman, the orator, the editor, the politician – it is now time to trace the many private lives of Douglass as a family man.

Sharing untold stories, this talk traces the activism, artistry and authorship of Frederick Douglass not in isolation but alongside the sufferings and struggles for survival of his daughters and sons.

Working with unpublished writings, letters and speeches and photographs, we learn that the fight for freedom was a family business to which all the Douglasses dedicated their lives.
A book signing will follow with the author.
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Date and Time

Wednesday, September 5, 6:30 pm
For more information call 443-263-1800
Admission included with museum admission

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VIDEO: Frederick Douglass book reviews; inaccurate & speculative Yale Prof. David Blight is a disgrace

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Frederick Douglass Bicentennial Banners throughout Fell’s Point; Greedy Reads bookstore at corner of South Ann & Aliceanna Streets maintains centuries-old tradition of radical booksellers

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Frederick Douglass Bicentennial Banner on Thames Street in Historic Fell’s Point, Baltimore.

Throughout stone streets and corners a juvenile Frederick Bailey hit running up against and with the Point Boys and Town Boys of 1820s and 1830s Baltimore dozens of commemorative banners affix light poles recognizing the bicentennial birth year of a local legend known throughout all four corners of the Earth.

Baltimore City Mayor Catherine Pugh and partnering organizations Living Classrooms at the Frederick Douglass-Isaac Myers Museum Maritime Museum and Park, Society for the Preservation of Federal Hill and Fell’s Point, Crossroads School and Morgan State Professor Dale Green of the Maryland Commission on African American History and Culture must be applauded and acknowledged for uplifting and elevating Dr. Frederick (Bailey) Douglass in such a proper and public way.

In the full spirit of celebration of Dr. Douglass we must also acknowledge his emergence as a lifelong bibliophile began during his time in Fell’s Point.

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Looking out the window of Greedy Reads bookstore at corner of South Ann & Aliceanna Streets.

Parlaying fifty cents earned from “blacking boots for some gentlemen” a defiant adolescent Frederick Bailey purchased The Colombian Orator from radical bookseller Nathaniel Knight’s shop at 28 Thames Street.

During our flâneur through Fell’s Point yesterday we stopped by Greedy Reeds, Fell’s Point only independent book store, at the corner of South Ann and Aliceanna Streets, a tilt Frederick Bailey passed going to and fro.

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Radical bookselling tradition still alive in Fell’s Point at Greedy Reads.

Julia, the proprietress of Greedy Reads, is a radical bookseller, keeping a local tradition alive that goes back centuries.

We thank all in Fell’s Point for elevating the history and the neighborhood.

We hope leaders within Washington City and the greater Old Anacostia neighborhood can follow the lead of our friends in Easton, Maryland in Talbot County and Fell’s Point by installing bicentennial banners of our own.

It is the least Washington City and Old Anacostia can do to show our respect and appreciation for all Dr. Douglass did for the neighborhood and the city and continues to do with the presence of his benevolent spirit.

JM

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New Frederick Douglass books being published in 2018 [March update]

No automatic alt text available.A number of new Douglass books have already been published in the first two months of 2018 and more are expected throughout the year.

Here’s a brief list:

Frederick Douglass: America’s Prophet
D.H. Dilbeck
Pub Date: February 14, 2018

From his enslavement to freedom, Frederick Douglass was one of America’s most extraordinary champions of liberty and equality. Throughout his long life, Douglass was also a man of profound religious conviction. In this concise and original biography, D. H. Dilbeck offers a provocative interpretation of Douglass’s life through the lens of his faith. In an era when the role of religion in public life is as contentious as ever, Dilbeck provides essential new perspective on Douglass’s place in American history.

Douglass came to faith as a teenager among African American Methodists in Baltimore. For the rest of his life, he adhered to a distinctly prophetic Christianity. Imitating the ancient Hebrew prophets and Jesus Christ, Douglass boldly condemned evil and oppression, especially when committed by the powerful. Dilbeck shows how Douglass’s prophetic Christianity provided purpose and unity to his wide-ranging work as an author, editor, orator, and reformer. As “America’s Prophet,” Douglass exposed his nation’s moral failures and hypocrisies in the hopes of creating a more just society. He admonished his fellow Americans to truly abide by the political and religious ideals they professed to hold most dear. Two hundred years after his birth, Douglass’s prophetic voice remains as timely as ever.

The Frederick Douglass Papers: Series Three: Correspondence, Volume 2: 1853-1865
Frederick Douglass (Author)
Pub Date: April 24, 2018

The second collection of meticulously edited correspondence with abolitionist, author, statesman, and former slave Frederick Douglass covers the years leading up to the Civil War through the close of the conflict, offering readers an illuminating portrait of an extraordinary American and the turbulent times in which he lived. An important contribution to historical scholarship, the documents offer fascinating insights into the abolitionist movement during wartime and the author’s relationship to Abraham Lincoln and other prominent figures of the era.

If I Survive: Frederick Douglass and Family in the Walter O. Evans Collection
Celeste-Marie Bernier (Author),‎ Andrew Taylor (Author)
Pub Date: September 1, 2018

  • Over 60 previously unpublished speeches, letters and autobiographies and over 20 photographs and prints (many unseen) of Frederick Douglass and his sons from the Walter O. Evans collection.
  • The first extensive study of Frederick Douglass and his family’s fight for the cause of liberty during the Civil War and in the Post-Emancipation era
    The first scholarly annotated transcriptions of these previously unpublished materials
  • In-depth individual chronologies mapping the life stories of Frederick Douglass and his sons, Lewis Henry, Frederick Jr., and Charles Remond Douglass

This book consists of a 100,000 word research monograph and 60,000 words of original manuscript facsimile pages as accompanied by edited transcriptions and scholarly notes. This volume will benefit the reader by publishing the previously unseen letters, essays, and photographs of Frederick Douglass and his sons, Charles Remond and Lewis Henry Douglass, held in the Walter O. Evans collection. A first for specialist researchers in the fields of US history/ Slavery Studies/ African American Studies/ American Studies/ Transatlantic Studies as well as for general audiences interested in the lives and works of a legendary US historical figure, this scholarly edition will consist of an introduction followed by annotated facsimile reproductions of the writings of Douglass and his sons who not only fought in the Civil War but were civil rights campaigners and political activists. While there were many Frederick Douglasses to fit every era – Douglass the fugitive slave, Douglass the antislavery orator, Douglass the autobiographer, Douglass the statesman, and Douglass the transatlantic reformer – this book breaks new ground by shedding light on Douglass the family man.

Pictures and Power: Imaging and Imagining Frederick Douglass 1818-2018
Edited by Celeste-Marie Bernier and Bill E. Lawson
Pub Date: December 11, 2017

Pictures and Power: Imaging and Imagining Frederick Douglass 1818-2018 is the result of decades of collaborations and conversations among academics, artists, and activists living and working in the UK and the US. For the first time, contributors map Douglass’ eclectic and experimental visual archive across an array of aesthetic, social, political, cultural, historical, ideological, and philosophical contexts. While Douglass the activist, diplomat, statesman, politician, autobiographer, orator, essayist, historian, memoirist, correspondent, and philosopher have been the focus of a scholarly industry over the decades, Douglass the art historian and the subject of photographs, paintings, prints, and sculpture let alone mass visual culture has only begun to be explored. Across this volume, scholars share their groundbreaking research investigating Douglass’ significance as the subject of visual culture and as himself a self-reflexive image-maker and radical theorist. Pictures and Power has come to life from a conviction endorsed by Douglass himself: the battleground against slavery and the fight for equal rights had many staging grounds and was by no means restricted to the plantation, the antislavery podium, the legal court, the stump circuit, the campaign trail, or even the educational institution but rather bled through every arena of imaginative, political and artistic life.

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Updated: “Women in the World of Frederick Douglass” wins award for Distinguished Scholarship. Dr. Leigh Fought uplifting Douglassonian studies for current and future generations.

FD statue in Rochester _ Leigh Fought book

Old Rochester. Statue of Frederick Douglass with copy of Women in the World of Frederick Douglass.

In recent days we’ve caught chatter Women in the World of Frederick Douglass by Dr. Leigh Fought, Associate History Professor at Le Moyne College, has been selected for a book award recognizing distinguished scholarship.

In truth, there are less than 100 original works of book matter scholarship on Douglass. Dr. Fought’s book upon publication immediately became a top 20 work, if not a top 10 work.

The permanence and prominence of Dr. Fought’s book in the limited pantheon of Douglass Studies will surely grow in time as it will become a foundational text. True scholars need not worry about the out-sized and distortive role Love Across Color Lines has played for nearly two decades. Dr. Fought is Omar out here and has relegated Diedrich’s “inventive” work to where it belongs.

Henceforth all informed advisers for graduate students and self-professed FD scholars and “experts” must use Dr. Fought’s book and public scholarship as a starting point for the discovery of the variety of networks FD had with not only women reformists, humanists, journalists, suffragists but activists from all walks of life.

Dr. Fought is a Douglassonian in both her scholarship and deportment.

Dr. Fought will be delivering a keynote, “The Women of Cedar Hill,” at the Frederick Douglass Annual Birthday Celebration to be held at the Frederick Douglass National Historic Park at 1411 W Street SE in Old Anacostia, D.C. on Sunday, February 18, 2018. Dr. Fought’s address will be at 3:00 pm.

Without any fanfare or ceremony the co-founders of 16th & W Street Douglassonians awarded Dr. Fought a lifetime passport for the 1-6 and all of Old Anacostia many months ago. It was one of the first actions taken in our informal board meetings.

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Editor’s Note:

In January I ran into Harold Holzer doing research within the Manuscripts Reading Room of the Madison Building. During closing time, as researchers gathered their things, I exchanged a few words with the internationally known Lincolnonian scholar.

It was unclear if Holzer knew specifically about Dr. Fought’s book or was simply confused in our conversation, relaying something along the lines that he thought “women’s studies” within the field of FD Studies was the current and/or new trend line.

Accompanied by a Douglassonian friend, we made sure Holzer knew the baseball card statistics and details of Dr. Fought’s book: Oxford University Press. May 2017. Women in the World of Frederick Douglass. ISBN, etc. All that.

I told him to know about the book. The message was received.

I then proceeded to tell Mr. Holzer that David Blight, who he confirmed he knew by referencing his long, long, long talked about biography, was a disgrace to Frederick Douglass, the man and Frederick Douglass, the self-taught scholar.

I told Mr. Holzer I represent street corner historians, 16th & W Street Douglassonians, and among my current work on Frederick Douglass in Paris, I was committed to exposing Blight and the institutions that have supported his mediocrity and non-existent Douglass scholarship over the past decade and a half with full force and no mercy.

Holzer said he similarly didn’t have an advanced degree and could sympathize with my plight as an outsider waging battle as a lone warrior against the safety and protective comfort of the Ivory Towers.

Holzer said facts and research will carry the day at the end of the day. For Omar and Super-Omars of FD studies there’s only a single word we can say to that truth.

Indeed.

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Prof. Fought’s status as anything related to 16th & W Street Douglassonians has been immediately revoked as of Thursday, July 30.

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Frederick Douglass’ book translated into French and printed in Paris, 1883 [Mes Années D’esclavage Et De Libertie = My Years of Slavery and Liberty]

FD in Paris _ p. 4 (1883 translation)ED Note: This isn’t the best quality scan but you get the idea. The idea is Parisians knew about FD before he stepped through la rues.

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CATO Institute: “Frederick Douglass: Self-Made Man” February 8, 2018 (4:00 pm to 5:30 pm)

Featuring author Timothy Sandefur, Vice President for Litigation and Duncan Chair in Constitutional Government, Goldwater Institute; with comments by Juan Williams, Political Analyst and Host, Fox News; and Jonathan Blanks, Research Associate, Cato Institute; moderated by Roger Pilon, Vice President for Legal Affairs, Cato Institute.

Born into slavery in 1818, Frederick Douglass rose to become one of the nation’s foremost intellectuals—a statesman, author, lecturer, and scholar who helped lead the fight against slavery and racial oppression. But unlike some other prominent abolitionists, Douglass embraced the U.S. Constitution, insisting that it was essentially an anti-slavery document and that its guarantees for individual rights belonged to all Americans, of all races. Further, in his most popular lecture, “Self-Made Men,” Douglass spoke of people who rise through their own efforts and devotion rather than through circumstances of privilege. As the nation pauses to remember him on his bicentennial, Frederick Douglass: Self-Made Man takes a fresh look at his remarkable life and ideas and the enduring principles of equality and liberty. Weaving together history, politics, and philosophy, this new biography illuminates Douglass’s immense scholarship with his personal experiences. Please join us as we discuss how Douglass’s legacy continues to inspire today.

If you can’t make it to the event, you can watch it live online and join the conversation on Twitter using #CatoBooks.

For more information and to register:

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