Posts Tagged book talks

Upcoming presentations and talks on “Lost History of Frederick Douglass” (February – April 2019) across the entire state of Maryland from Baltimore to Denton to Hagerstown

*FEBRUARY*

Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 1 pm
Central Library – Denton, Caroline County Public Library
100 Market Street
Denton, MD 21629

Lost History of Frederick Douglass in Caroline County, Maryland

Following the discovery and presentation of the “Lost History of Frederick Douglass in Cambridge, Maryland,” local historian John Muller will present on the unknown history of Frederick Douglass in Caroline County.

Monday, February 11, 2019 
Sheraton Hotel
Alexandria, Virginia
Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States

“Frederick Douglass and the Lincoln Family”

Tuesday, February 12, 2019 at 7 pm
Hagerstown Central Branch, Washington County Free Library
100 South Potomac Street
Hagerstown, Maryland 21740

“Lost History of Frederick Douglass in Hagerstown, Maryland”

Frederick Douglass rose from the depths of slavery on Maryland’s Eastern Shore to travel three continents and counsel a half-dozen Presidents.

You may think you know his story but did you know Douglass visited Hagerstown?!

In 1879 Douglass took a train to “Hub City” where he delivered an address to benefit Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church. Future United States Congressman and United States Senator, Hagerstonian Louis E. McComas introduced Douglass before he spoke at the court house on Washington Street.

Hear historian and author John Muller share never before published details of Dr. Frederick Douglass’ visit to Hagerstown walking the community and lodging in the historic Washington House.

Saturday, February 16, 2019 at 2 pm
Ebenezer African Methodist Episcopal Church
26 Bethel Street
Hagerstown, Maryland 21740

“Lost History of Frederick Douglass in Western Maryland”

Using newly discovered information found in public and private archives, Muller will share information that uplifts the history of consequential visits Douglass made to Frederick City, Hagerstown and Cumberland, as well as lifelong associations Douglass had with abolitionists, politicians, and faith and community leaders of the Cumberland Valley region.

Saturday, February 23, 2019
Delaplaine Visual Arts Center
40 South Carroll Street
Frederick, Maryland 21701
Frederick County Historic Sites Consortium Yearly Master Docent Series Workshop 2019

Thursday, February 28, 2019 at 6:30 pm
Enoch Pratt Central Library, African American Department 
400 Cathedral Street
Baltimore, Maryland 21201

John Muller, author of Frederick Douglass in Washington, D.C.: The Lion of Anacostia and Mark Twain in Washington, D.C.: The Adventures of a Capital Correspondent, will present “The Lost History of Frederick (Bailey) Douglass in Baltimore” using newly discovered information found in the Baltimore City Archives, Maryland Historical Society, Enoch Pratt Free Library, and private archives. Muller has presented widely throughout the DC-Baltimore metropolitan area at venues including the Library of Congress, Newseum, Politics and Prose, American Library in Paris and local universities. He is currently working on a book about the lost history of Frederick Douglass on Maryland’s Eastern Shore.

John Muller will be in conversation with Dr. Ida E. Jones, Morgan State University archivist.

Writers LIVE programs are supported in part by a bequest from The Miss Howard Hubbard Adult Programming Fund. 


*APRIL*

Tuesday, April 6, 2019
Frostburg State University
Frostburg, Maryland
“Lost History of Frederick Douglass in Cumberland and Allegany County, Maryland”

Wednesday, April 24, 2019 at 7:00 pm
Woodlawn Manor Cultural Park
16501 Norwood Road
Sandy Spring, Maryland 20860

Image result for frederick douglass emily edmonsonHave you heard stories of Frederick Douglass stepping through the country roads of Brinklow and Sandy Spring?

According to oral tradition Dr. Douglass, an internationally known abolitionist, statesmen, orator and journalist, was known to visit multiple families in our area.

Emily Edmonson Johnson, born an enslaved person in Montgomery County and an escapee of the Pearl in 1848, was photographed with Frederick Douglass and other abolitionist at a convention to protest the 1850 Fugitive Slave Law. Following her education at Oberlin in Ohio and serving as a teacher at the Miner School in Washington, D.C., Edmonson married Larkin Johnson in the early 1860s and lived in the Sandy Spring community for nearly a decade. She later moved to Hillsdale in Washington, D.C., adjacent to Anacostia where her friend Frederick Douglass lived which is preserved as the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site.

Find out more about Frederick Douglass and his connections from Sharp Street Church to state politics in post-Civil War Maryland and unknown visits to communities from Cumberland to Cambridge.

Saturday, April 27, 2019
Porch Program at the Newcomer House
18422 Shepherdstown Pike
Keedysville, Maryland 21756

“Lost History of Frederick Douglass in Western Maryland”

, , , , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

Photo Archives: Presentation @ Woman’s National Democratic Club (Washington, DC)

,

Leave a comment

George Washington University Museum and Textile Museum presents talk with two Douglass authors & graduates [Monday, October 1 @ 12 Noon]

Image may contain: text


With nationwide recognition of the Frederick Douglass Bicentennial occurring across the country and around the globe, join GW graduates and authors Paul Kendrick and John Muller as they discuss their respective books covering the relationship between Frederick Douglass and President Lincoln, and the life and times of Douglass in “Washington City.”

Their discussion will be moderated by GW Professor Randi Kristensen.

Monday, October 1, 2018
12:00pm
The George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum
701 21st Street, NW
Washington, DC 20052

, ,

Leave a comment

The National Park Service Invites You to a Book Discussion on “If I Survive” (Thurs, Sept. 6, 2018, 7pm – 9pm)

Image may contain: 3 people, people smiling


 

Join us on Thursday at 7pm, as historians and authors Celeste-Marie Bernier and Andrew Taylor are on-hand to discuss their book, “If I Survive: Frederick Douglass and Family in the Walter O. Evans Collection” published by Edinburgh University Press.

The book is a collection of 60 previously unpublished speeches, letters and autobiographies, in addition to over 20 photographs and prints (many unseen) of Frederick Douglass and his sons from the Walter O. Evans Collection. This is the first extensive study of the great abolitionist and his family’s fight for the cause of liberty during the Civil War and in the Post-Emancipation era, as well as the first scholarly annotated transcriptions of these previously unpublished materials.

We hope you can join us for this Book Discussion featuring authors Bernier and Taylor!

Copies of the book will also be available for purchase in the site bookstore. #Douglass200

, , , , ,

Leave a comment

Author Talk & Book Signing: “If I Survive” by Dr. Celeste-Marie Bernier @ Twin Oaks – Friday, September, 7, 1-3pm [Ticket $25, sponsored by Maryland State Archives]


Please consider joining us for this very special event!
Seating is limited and is anticipated to sell out quickly.

To reserve your seat and copy of the book please call 410-260-6461.

, , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

“Frederick Douglass in Rochester with John Muller” at Writers and Books (September 10 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm)

Frederick Douglass in Rochester with John Muller

September 10 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

With the continued recognition of the Frederick Douglass Bicentennial throughout the year join Washington, D.C.-based journalist and historian John Muller for a presentation beyond the common lore and mythology of Dr. Frederick Douglass.

John Muller, author of Frederick Douglass in Washington, D.C.: The Lion of Anacostia (The History Press, 2012), will share largely unknown and previously unpublished material on the activities, experiences and relationships of Dr. Frederick Douglass and his family in Rochester and Monroe County, New York within the community of newspaper editors and journalists, abolitionists, reformists and educators.

Learn how Douglass’ extensive Rochester network sustained him and frequently visited the Douglass family in Washington City.

Additionally, Muller will provide updates on Bicentennial activities in the Washington, D.C.-Baltimore-Eastern Shore area.

PowerPoint Presentation, Audience Q & A, books available for sale.


Writers & Books
740 University Avenue
Rochester, NY 14607
https://wab.org

, ,

Leave a comment

Old Anacostia Douglassonian John Muller coming to Talbot County (St. Michaels Museum & Talbot County Free Library)

JHM _ meeting 8.6.2018.jpg

, ,

Leave a comment

Author Talk: If I Survive The Frederick Douglass Family’s Struggle for Liberty | Reginald F. Lewis Museum (Wed., September 5, 2018 @ 6:30 pm)

Author Talk: If I Survive The Frederick Douglass Family’s Struggle for Liberty

Wednesday, September 5, 6:30pm

While there have been many public Frederick Douglasses – the abolitionist, the statesman, the orator, the editor, the politician – it is now time to trace the many private lives of Douglass as a family man.

Sharing untold stories, this talk traces the activism, artistry and authorship of Frederick Douglass not in isolation but alongside the sufferings and struggles for survival of his daughters and sons.

Working with unpublished writings, letters and speeches and photographs, we learn that the fight for freedom was a family business to which all the Douglasses dedicated their lives.
A book signing will follow with the author.
———

Date and Time

Wednesday, September 5, 6:30 pm
For more information call 443-263-1800
Admission included with museum admission

, , , , ,

Leave a comment

CATO Institute: “Frederick Douglass: Self-Made Man” February 8, 2018 (4:00 pm to 5:30 pm)

Featuring author Timothy Sandefur, Vice President for Litigation and Duncan Chair in Constitutional Government, Goldwater Institute; with comments by Juan Williams, Political Analyst and Host, Fox News; and Jonathan Blanks, Research Associate, Cato Institute; moderated by Roger Pilon, Vice President for Legal Affairs, Cato Institute.

Born into slavery in 1818, Frederick Douglass rose to become one of the nation’s foremost intellectuals—a statesman, author, lecturer, and scholar who helped lead the fight against slavery and racial oppression. But unlike some other prominent abolitionists, Douglass embraced the U.S. Constitution, insisting that it was essentially an anti-slavery document and that its guarantees for individual rights belonged to all Americans, of all races. Further, in his most popular lecture, “Self-Made Men,” Douglass spoke of people who rise through their own efforts and devotion rather than through circumstances of privilege. As the nation pauses to remember him on his bicentennial, Frederick Douglass: Self-Made Man takes a fresh look at his remarkable life and ideas and the enduring principles of equality and liberty. Weaving together history, politics, and philosophy, this new biography illuminates Douglass’s immense scholarship with his personal experiences. Please join us as we discuss how Douglass’s legacy continues to inspire today.

If you can’t make it to the event, you can watch it live online and join the conversation on Twitter using #CatoBooks.

For more information and to register:

, , , ,

Leave a comment

Book Talk at the Beatley Central Library, tomorrow, Wed., May 14th @ 7pm

Literary Calendar _ John MullerAs part of All Alexandria Reads I’ll be giving a presentation tomorrow, Wednesday, May 14th at the Beatley Central Library at 7pm. See you there!

, ,

Leave a comment