Posts Tagged Baltimore

“Baltimore” circa 1837 (Moses Swett & Philip Haas)

Baltimore, c. 1840, around the time when Berger Cookies were introduced to the city.


SOURCE:

Library of Congress

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Note on Rev. Dr. Pharaoh Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey Douglass among contemporary men of God -> “The Late Bishop Payne. A Monument in His Honor Unveiled at Baltimore.” (May 1894)

Bishop Alexander Walker Wayman and Bishop Daniel Alexander Payne, both of whom were buried in Laurel Cemetery. Coming up out an African Methodist church erected in a Fell’s Point alley following American Independence Pharaoh Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey Douglass emerged within ranks of the most consequential religious leaders of America’s antebellum, Civil War and Reconstruction eras.

Among the most respected of America’s African-American reverends and educators who travelled the world establishing outposts of the church and their compensatory schools Pharaoh Douglass was always offered opportunity to teach Sunday school and Bible study, a tradition he maintained from his days in St. Michaels in the 1830s until his last day on earth.

Throughout his life Rev. Dr. Pharoah Douglass ran and prayed from country camp revivals to town and city street corners to the lecture stages and halls of universities among white and black faith leaders within circles of African Methodists, Methodist Episcopalians, Baptists, Protestants, Congregationalists, Unitarian Universalists, Quakers, Hebrews and Mohammedans.

Rev. Dr. Pharoah Douglass aided men of God building institutions that maintain today as men of God enlisted the aid of Rev. Dr. Pharoah Douglass building, developing, and guarding institutions furthering faith and education.

Along with the early founders of Howard University, in which Dr. Rev. Pharaoh Douglass served as a board member from 1871 until his death, men of God who aided in founding Morgan State University in Baltimore City and American University in Washington, D.C. ran with Rev. Dr. Pharoah Douglass.

In May 1894 Bishop John Fletcher Hurst and Reverend Lyttleton Morgan joined arms in brotherly remembrance and honor with Dr. Douglass, Bishop Alexander Wayman, Bishop Henry McNeal Turner, Rev. Dr. John W. E. Bowen and other men of God to remember the late Bishop Daniel Alexander Payne.

Despite numerous accolades and laudatory reviews, David Blight’s deeply flawed Prophet of Freedom fails to place Douglass within this vast network of men of God.

Therefore Blight’s singular reference to Bishop Daniel Alexander Payne in Prophet of Freedom is blasphemous.


Evening Star _ 22 May 1894. p 9 - Payne Monument in Baltimore_ cropTHE LATE BISHOP PAYNE.

A Monument in His Honor Unveiled at Baltimore.

The monument to the memory of the late Bishop Daniel A. Payne, D. D., LL. D., who was the senior bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, was unveiled yesterday afternoon at Laurel Cemetery, in the northeastern suburbs of Baltimore, in the presence of a large number of colored people.

The exercises included addresses by Rev. Dr. J. H. A. Johnson of Ellicott City, Frederick Douglass and Rev. Dr. W. B. Derrick of New York, and prayer by Rev. Dr. L. F. Morgan, prior to the unveiling by Bishop H. M. Turner, D. D., of Georgia.

Rev. John Hurt read the names of the contributors to the monument fund and Rev. J. G. Morris, D. D., closed the services by pronouncing the benediction. On the stand, besides the above, were Bishop W. J. Gaines, D. D., Bishop J. A. Hunter of Kansas, Bishop M. B. Salters of South Carolina, Bishop A. W. Wayman, Rev. J. M. Bowen and others.


SOURCE:

Evening Star, 22 May, 1894, p. 9.

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Johns Hopkins News-Letter, “Scholars explore personal life of Frederick Douglass” (March 7, 2019)

Scholars explore personal life of Frederick Douglass

By JERRY WU | March 7, 2019


John Muller, author of Frederick Douglass in Washington, D.C., and Ida Jones, archivist at Morgan State University, presented new research on Frederick Douglass at the Enoch Pratt Free Library on Thursday, Feb. 28. The research centered around Douglass’ experiences as a young man in Baltimore and sought to fill in narrative holes regarding his life.

Douglass is known for his work on abolitionism, social reform and literary works. He was born Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey and later changed his last name to Douglass at the suggestion of a member of the Underground Railroad who had harbored him during his escape from slavery.

Community member Derrick Camper noted that these personal details add to Douglass’ story as a historical figure.

“We always get this one thing about him, just like Martin Luther King and Malcolm X,” Camper said. “But there’s more to him than what you read and see on T.V. There’s a person behind him.”

Muller and Jones’ research focused on other aspects of Douglass’ personal life, particularly his formative years in Baltimore. In his presentation, Muller told a story about Douglass’ purchase of a book in Baltimore, an event that may have been a catalyst for his later activism.

“When Douglass is about 12 years old, he buys the book The Columbian OratorThe Columbian Orator was a collection of essays and a very popular schoolbook of its day. There is a dialogue between a master and a slave in The Columbian Orator. Douglass talks extensively of how this book resonated with him and how important it was to his personal history,” he said.

According to Muller, the purchase of this book would not have been possible without the help of a little-known figure named Nathaniel Knight. Briefly mentioned in Douglass’ 1892 autobiography, Knight was a bookseller and prominent community member in the Fell’s Point neighborhood. By selling to books to Douglass, Knight was taking a big risk.

“This guy was breaking the law. Big time breaking the law,” Muller said. “He was a radical bookseller. This is a very radical action… He was supplying the black community with literature and a lot of other things, which he should not have been doing because it was illegal.”

Muller and Jones consider Knight just one of the many forgotten figures in what they call “the lost history of Frederick Douglass.” Jones said that it is necessary to understand the more quotidian aspects of Douglass’ life through his research. According to the researchers, this process has not been easy.

“African-American history has largely been an oral tradition,” Jones said. “Documentary evidence is lacking.”

As a result, scholars have had to rely heavily on Douglass’ autobiographies to study his personal life, which, though insightful, do not provide an all-encompassing chronicle.

However, having pored through many historical documents in their research, Muller and Jones have uncovered new information that adds texture to Douglass’ story.

“I found something in a newspaper from 1917, in which Richard Greener (the first black graduate of Harvard College) recalled a story that Frederick Douglass had told him about why he wore his hair the way he did,” Muller said. “The reason, according to Douglass, was that as a young man, possibly in Baltimore, he saw a picture of Alexander Dumas, the Afro-Franco writer. Douglass was struck by Dumas’ presentation as very unapologetically African, and Douglass adopted that hairstyle for his entire life.”

Jones added that these details and interesting facts bring Douglass’ story to life.

“When you’re able to find the historical records on various people that Douglass interacted with and people who had an influence on Douglass’s life, you get a sense of dimension to Douglass where he’s not only this lofty elder statesman but also a regular person,” Jones said. “He was a teenager. He did run the streets with the Fell’s Point boys. He lived a life similar to our own. It makes him much more relatable.”

Muller clarified that making Douglass more relatable in no way tarnishes his legacy. On the contrary, Muller asserted that by moving past the mythologized version of Douglass, one could begin to examine the tangible impact he had on people of his day. Muller said that Douglass spoke to benefit churches, night schools, scholarship funds and orphanages. For Douglass, it was not only about making grand speeches and writing letters to President Abraham Lincoln but also doing little things to help people in his community.

Jones said that the mythologized version of Douglass remains deeply ingrained in people’s psyche. When asked about what she thought of his legacy, Jones acknowledged this.

“Douglass became a paragon of what’s possible as an African American,” she said. “But maybe that’s not a bad thing. Mythologized figures are essential to how we think of ourselves as Americans. Figures like Douglass inspire us to stand up for what we know is right, whether it be in the fight against racism, sexism, inequality or any other injustice.”

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“The Lost History of Frederick (Bailey) Douglass in Baltimore” @ Enoch Pratt Central Library –> Thurs, February 28, 2019 at 6:30 PM

IMG_7730The Lost History of Frederick (Bailey) Douglass in Baltimore

John Muller, author of Frederick Douglass in Washington, D.C.: The Lion of Anacostia and Mark Twain in Washington, D.C.: The Adventures of a Capital Correspondent, will present “The Lost History of Frederick (Bailey) Douglass in Baltimore” using newly discovered information found in the Baltimore City Archives, Maryland Historical Society, Enoch Pratt Free Library, and private archives. Muller has presented widely throughout the DC-Baltimore metropolitan area at venues including the Library of Congress, Newseum, Politics and Prose, American Library in Paris and local universities. He is currently working on a book about the lost history of Frederick Douglass on Maryland’s Eastern Shore.

John Muller will be in conversation
with Dr. Ida E. Jones, Morgan State University Archivist.

Writers LIVE programs are supported in part by a bequest from The Miss Howard Hubbard Adult Programming Fund. 


 Thursday, February 28 at 6:30pm

 Central Library, African American Department
400 Cathedral Street
Baltimore, MD 21201

EVENTBRITE 

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Video: JHU Professor Martha S. Jones discusses “Birthright Citizens: A History of Race and Rights in Antebellum America” and Editor’s Note

 


Editor’s Note:

Johns Hopkins University Professor of History Martha S. Jones has been around the corner and across the world uplifting lost history as of late.

In her groundbreaking work, Birthright Citizens: A History of Race and Rights in Antebellum America (Cambridge University Press, 2018), Prof. Jones documents the legal declarations and assertions of citizenship made by the antebellum black community of Baltimore City in radical opposition to the Maryland state legislature supporting African colonization as a matter of long-term public policy.  Colonization was supported with a capital budget.

As a street historian I have picked up old maps of Africa which show “Maryland” as a state or county of Liberia. I eventually learned in 1832 the state of Maryland funded a census of all free black folks in the state to better inform its policy efforts in the colonization of black Marylanders.

The era and epoch of Baltimore community history in which Prof. Jones chronicles is from whence Dr. Frederick (Bailey) Douglass emerges and escapes in September 1838.

I suggest scholars take the lead of Prof. Jones and get to studying and researching. There is much work to be done to correct generations of incomplete scholarship and lies.

JM

P.S. I will be referencing Prof. Jones work on Thursday, February 28, 2019 at the Central Branch of the Enoch Pratt Library in the presentation of “The Lost History of Frederick (Bailey) in Baltimore.” Morgan State University archivist Dr. Ida E. Jones will offer remarks and moderate.


Follow Prof. Jones on her blog: http://marthasjones.com/blog/

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Upcoming presentations and talks on “Lost History of Frederick Douglass” (February – April 2019) across the entire state of Maryland from Baltimore to Denton to Hagerstown

*FEBRUARY*

Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 1 pm
Central Library – Denton, Caroline County Public Library
100 Market Street
Denton, MD 21629

Lost History of Frederick Douglass in Caroline County, Maryland

Following the discovery and presentation of the “Lost History of Frederick Douglass in Cambridge, Maryland,” local historian John Muller will present on the unknown history of Frederick Douglass in Caroline County.

Monday, February 11, 2019 
Sheraton Hotel
Alexandria, Virginia
Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States

“Frederick Douglass and the Lincoln Family”

Tuesday, February 12, 2019 at 7 pm
Hagerstown Central Branch, Washington County Free Library
100 South Potomac Street
Hagerstown, Maryland 21740

“Lost History of Frederick Douglass in Hagerstown, Maryland”

Frederick Douglass rose from the depths of slavery on Maryland’s Eastern Shore to travel three continents and counsel a half-dozen Presidents.

You may think you know his story but did you know Douglass visited Hagerstown?!

In 1879 Douglass took a train to “Hub City” where he delivered an address to benefit Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church. Future United States Congressman and United States Senator, Hagerstonian Louis E. McComas introduced Douglass before he spoke at the court house on Washington Street.

Hear historian and author John Muller share never before published details of Dr. Frederick Douglass’ visit to Hagerstown walking the community and lodging in the historic Washington House.

Saturday, February 16, 2019 at 2 pm
Ebenezer African Methodist Episcopal Church
26 Bethel Street
Hagerstown, Maryland 21740

“Lost History of Frederick Douglass in Western Maryland”

Using newly discovered information found in public and private archives, Muller will share information that uplifts the history of consequential visits Douglass made to Frederick City, Hagerstown and Cumberland, as well as lifelong associations Douglass had with abolitionists, politicians, and faith and community leaders of the Cumberland Valley region.

Saturday, February 23, 2019
Delaplaine Visual Arts Center
40 South Carroll Street
Frederick, Maryland 21701
Frederick County Historic Sites Consortium Yearly Master Docent Series Workshop 2019

Thursday, February 28, 2019 at 6:30 pm
Enoch Pratt Central Library, African American Department 
400 Cathedral Street
Baltimore, Maryland 21201

John Muller, author of Frederick Douglass in Washington, D.C.: The Lion of Anacostia and Mark Twain in Washington, D.C.: The Adventures of a Capital Correspondent, will present “The Lost History of Frederick (Bailey) Douglass in Baltimore” using newly discovered information found in the Baltimore City Archives, Maryland Historical Society, Enoch Pratt Free Library, and private archives. Muller has presented widely throughout the DC-Baltimore metropolitan area at venues including the Library of Congress, Newseum, Politics and Prose, American Library in Paris and local universities. He is currently working on a book about the lost history of Frederick Douglass on Maryland’s Eastern Shore.

John Muller will be in conversation with Dr. Ida E. Jones, Morgan State University archivist.

Writers LIVE programs are supported in part by a bequest from The Miss Howard Hubbard Adult Programming Fund. 


*APRIL*

Tuesday, April 6, 2019
Frostburg State University
Frostburg, Maryland
“Lost History of Frederick Douglass in Cumberland and Allegany County, Maryland”

Wednesday, April 24, 2019 at 7:00 pm
Woodlawn Manor Cultural Park
16501 Norwood Road
Sandy Spring, Maryland 20860

Image result for frederick douglass emily edmonsonHave you heard stories of Frederick Douglass stepping through the country roads of Brinklow and Sandy Spring?

According to oral tradition Dr. Douglass, an internationally known abolitionist, statesmen, orator and journalist, was known to visit multiple families in our area.

Emily Edmonson Johnson, born an enslaved person in Montgomery County and an escapee of the Pearl in 1848, was photographed with Frederick Douglass and other abolitionist at a convention to protest the 1850 Fugitive Slave Law. Following her education at Oberlin in Ohio and serving as a teacher at the Miner School in Washington, D.C., Edmonson married Larkin Johnson in the early 1860s and lived in the Sandy Spring community for nearly a decade. She later moved to Hillsdale in Washington, D.C., adjacent to Anacostia where her friend Frederick Douglass lived which is preserved as the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site.

Find out more about Frederick Douglass and his connections from Sharp Street Church to state politics in post-Civil War Maryland and unknown visits to communities from Cumberland to Cambridge.

Saturday, April 27, 2019
Porch Program at the Newcomer House
18422 Shepherdstown Pike
Keedysville, Maryland 21756

“Lost History of Frederick Douglass in Western Maryland”

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Headstone for Nathaniel Knight, radical bookseller, in Baltimore’s Loudon Park Cemetery


Headstone for Nathaniel Knight, radical bookseller, located in Baltimore’s Loudon Park Cemetery.

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