Posts Tagged “art”

GoFundMe: Frederick Douglass Mural Exhibit planned for fall 2018 premier at The Charles Sumner School Museum & Archives in downtown Washington City

Fred Douglass wheat past on lower Martin Luther King Jr Ave SE

Wheat paste of Frederick Douglass on lower Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue SE. Photo by William Alston-El & John Muller.

From September 20, 2018 until October 13, 2018 an exhibit of Frederick Douglass public art murals in Washington, D.C., Baltimore and Rochester will be on display and review at The Charles Sumner School Museum and Archives at 17th & M Streets in downtown Washington, D.C.

Public programming will accompany the exhibit highlighting presentations on Frederick Douglass in Washington, D.C., murals throughout the world and the importance of visual representation and photography to Frederick Douglass, the most photographed American of the 19th Century.

Sponsors will be thanked by name in public program and other materials.

Donations will cover costs associated with:

1) Printing high resolution photographs of murals
2) Framing photographs
3) exhibit installation — explanatory text for each mural
printing promotional materials – flyers, postcards, local advertisements and street team
4) honorariums for panel participants
5) costs of special commemorative edition of The Narrative of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave for youth ages 8 – 18
6) incidentals — materials, equipment, etc.

Community Picture Day _ Spread Southside Love _ March 2018

Community Picture Day, 16th & W Street SE. “Spread Southside Love” by Rebeka Ryvola

** Thank you to everyone who contributed to the Frederick Douglass Community Conference in December 2017 and to “Spread Southside Love” mural in February 2018.

Thank you for your continued support of the Frederick Douglass Bicentennial.**

DONATE HERE! 

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14 foot Frederick Douglass mural by Aniekan at 16th & W Street SE in Old Anacostia, Washington, DC

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Everyone involved with the installation of this new mural of a commanding Dr. Frederick (Bailey) Douglass at 16th & W Street SE should be applauded and commended, with special thanks to W Street Douglassonian Ms. Melody, store owner Ephrame, muralist Aniekan Udofia and all of Old Anacostia.

 

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Preliminary Sketch of 16th & W Street SE Frederick Douglass Mural

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Artistic rendering by Rebeka Ryvola 

If interested in supporting the new mural at 16th & W Street SE, please visit our GoFundMe page here: Frederick Douglass Community Mural.

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“Bent But Not Broken” exhibit opens at Banneker-Douglass Museum in Annapolis, February 13, 2018

Image result for banneker douglass museumBent But Not Broken – A Frederick Douglass Bicentennial Celebration Event

Maryland artist Ulysses Marshall captures Frederick Douglass’ spirit through his highly expressive mixed media compositions – his colorful and poetic collages delivered with blunt sincerity. Marshall’s work talks of the glory, the pain, and the hope in Douglass’ life and in the African-American experience.

Special Opening Reception: Saturday, February 17, 2018 3 pm – 5 pm

Exhibit brought to you by the Banneker-Douglass Museum

As the State of Maryland’s official museum of African American heritage, the Banneker-Douglass Museum serves to document, to interpret, and to promote African American history and culture (particularly in Maryland) through exhibitions, programs, and projects in order to improve the understanding and appreciating of America’s rich cultural diversity for all. The Banneker-Douglass Museum is a component of the Maryland Commission on African American History and Culture, which is a unit of the Governor’s Office of Community Initiatives — an executive-department agency, whose mandate to coordinate outreach efforts to communities, organizations, and local governments across Maryland serves as a unifying principle for all its departments.

 

Banneker-Douglass Museum

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New Cedar Hill Mural in Old Anacostia

Cedar Hill mural_Ketcham ES_15th St

Photo by John Muller & William Alston-El. Copyright strictly enforced online and offline.

Throughout the greater countryside and the greater DC metropolitan area there are Douglass statues. Throughout Ward 8 there are a number of murals and depictions of Mr. Frederick Douglass. Some are well done, while some could use a little touch-up work.

The newest Douglass-related mural doesn’t depict the visage of the Lion of Anacostia, instead it depicts local children planting and watering a sapling in the front lawn of Cedar Hill, the home of Douglass from the fall of 1877 until his death in February 1895.

This expansive vertical mural spans three stories on the 15th Street SE side of Ketcham Elementary School, named for Union General, Congressman and District Commissioner John H. Ketcham.

On the top reads, “Planting roots now to grow strong later.”

On the bottom reads, “Once you learn to read, you will forever be free.” – Frederick Douglass

This mural is part of a larger and ongoing renovation and beautification of the school famous and revered among the streets and inhabitants of Old Anacostia.

The mural was completed by Joe Pagac from Tucson, Arizona. Ketcham ES entered into a contest on Twitter and was selected for the mural from the DC Mural Arts Program –> MuralsDC/DPW #Nominatemywall campaign
Cedar Hill mural __ Ketcham ES & Wash monument

Photo by John Muller & William Alston-El. Copyright is strictly enforced, online and offline.

 

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Vote for Frederick Douglass (!!) to be the subject of special portrait at the Smithsonian (voting ends May 26)

Much respect due to iconoclast Samuel Morse (who has a head nod plaque on lower 7th Street NW), trailblazing Cuban-singer Celia Cruz, suffragist Alice Paul, and the most decorated hero of WWII, who with his brothers-in-arms went to hell and back and lived to tell, Audie Murphy, but our vote is going to Frederick Douglass.

Voting to select one of these five historical figures to be the subject of a special Robert Weingarten produced portrait closes next Saturday. VOTE HERE (FD needs some votes…your vote!)

Courtesy LOC [http://1.usa.gov/KkxIVa]

Rightfully headlining Douglass as an, “Orator, Activist, and Bad, Bad Man,” Christopher Wilson, Director of Daily Programs and the Program in African American Culture at the National Museum of American History, offers a refreshing take on the Lion of Anacostia that is worth special attention.

We generally don’t remember Douglass as we should. His stoic and stately presence and unimpeachable words stand out like a chiseled, motionless effigy. The Frederick Douglass we meet today in films, museums, and popular culture is generally a black “founding father,” with the attendant uninspiring, respectful persona of most depictions of Washington or Jefferson. I think of the portrayal of Douglass in the film Glory in which he dryly, properly, and very firmly offers his prediction of how the black soldiers of the 54th Massachusetts will honorably fight. I think of actors at museums and Civil War reenactments proclaiming the amazingly eloquent words that captivated audiences, but without the fire that made Douglass famous.

This overly honorific public memory of Douglass belies a life entirely defined by action—sometimes action-hero type action. Frederick Douglass was a fighter.

Well said, well said. And cot damn right.

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Are you so serious about Frederick Douglass you’d get his image tatted on your arm?

Jay Johnson's tat of Frederick Douglass.

Meet black memorabilia dealer Jay Johnson of Purcellville, Virginia who runs Soul Source. This weekend I bought an 1828 version of The Columbian Orator from him at the National Black Memorabilia and Collectible Show on the strength that Jay is so serious about Frederick Douglass he has Douglass’ image tattooed on the inside of his right forearm. As they say, “something serious.”

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