Posts Tagged antiquarian books

Frederick Douglass Family Matters: “A COLORED BROTHER OF THE M. E. CHURCH ROBBED OF AN ADOPTED CHILD WITH IMPUNITY BY A RICH WHITE BROTHER OF THE SAME CHURCH.”

Image result for john dixon longIn recent weeks we’ve learned of the legend of John Creighton.

For and in his name and the community of street historians he organized and gathered we will continue to rush the speculative revisionist historians with the facts.

And if folks such as Yale Professor David Blight continue in their blatant thievery of our sources, citations and information without attribution there will be further fury in the complete dismantling of “professional historians” who have less personal integrity than the lowest low-life dirty rotten scoundrel.

What differentiates Prof. Blight and the below described “rich Methodist” in their personal pursuit of profit through immorality?

Blight’s immorality is the profiteering of his speculative and revisionist scholarship, against the doctrine of Douglassonianism. The immorality of the “rich Methodist” is the profiteering of slavery, against the doctrine of Methodism.

David Blight told an audience gathered in Washington College in Kent County that the extended family of Dr. Frederick (Bailey) Douglass was “dysfunctional.”

No language can describe the disgrace that David Blight is to the uplifting of Douglassonian scholarship.

Out of the Ivory Towers, out of the Ivy Leagues comes David Blight’s speculative garbage.

Out of enslavement came Dr. Douglass and his entire tribe.

JM


The facts in the case are substantially these. A free colored man, and cousin of Frederick Douglass, who was liberated by Capt. Thomas Auld, of Talbot County (and I will just here say, without the knowledge or consent of Capt. Auld, that he has manumitted some six or eight young colored men and women since 1844), married a woman who was also free.

They had no children of their own; but a free colored woman, on her decease, had left them her little daughter to bring up. This man was sober and industrious, and a good painter. The little girl was old enough to be of great service to his wife, who was afflicted with partial blindness.

According to the laws of Maryland a white man can seize a free colored man’s children, take them before a magistrate, and have them bound to service against the consent of the parents. On the holy Sabbath, a rich Methodist, accompanied by a constable, went to the house of the colored man while he was absent, carried off the girl, and on Monday morning took her before a magistrate and had her bound to service.

A Methodist of standing took the part of the poor colored man, and appealed to the Orphans’ Court of Talbot County; but the Court decided that the oppressor had violated no law, and the counsel of the latter stated to the Court that the laws of Maryland did not recognize the parental relation among negroes any more than they recognized that which exists among brutes.

I then urged the preacher in charge to have the delinquent brought before the church. A committee was appointed; but the man was acquitted. And this moral and religious kidnapper is still in the church, and, I suppose, contributes his mite towards sending missionaries to convert the heathen.


 

SOURCE:

Research that research assistants for David Blight or David Blight himself has been shown to take without attribution.

 

, , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

Dr. William Henry Johnson: Albany (NY) Correspondent of “The North Star”

William Henry Johnson.pngDr. Frederick Douglass ran with them all. They all ran with Dr. Frederick Douglass.

William Cooper Nell, Martin Delany, Julia Griffiths, Mary Ann Shadd and others are often identified as editing and/or corresponding for The North Star and/or subsequent publications edited by Douglass but have you heard of Dr. William Henry Johnson?

From his 1900 biography

During the first year of the Civil War he was the war correspondent of James Redpath’s “Pine and Palm,” published at Boston, Mass. He was first with the Army of the Potomac during the three month’s campaign. He then joined the Burnside expedition and did service in North Carolina. At times he has been the Albany correspondent of Frederick Douglass’ Rochester paper, “The North Star,” the “Christian Recorder,” Philadelphia “The Freeman,” and “The Age,” New York city, and the “State Republican,” Plainfield, New Jersey. In 1892 he published and edited “The Calcium Light,” an independent journal, at Albany, and to-day, at intervals is publishing “The Albany Capital.”

, , , , ,

Leave a comment

Dr. Frederick (Bailey) Douglass & Higher Education: University of Rochester Edition, Pt. 1 [Dr. Douglass details friendship with Prof. John H. Raymond, 2nd President of Vassar College]

John Raymond.jpg

John Henry Raymond, professor at the University of Rochester and 2nd President of Vassar College, was a radical friend of Dr. Douglass while he lived in Rochester.

Dr. Frederick Douglass pursued self-education and contributed to institutions of higher learning throughout his entire adult life. However, scholarship on Dr. Douglass and higher education has evaded the picklocks of Douglassonian biographers; it is hidden in plain sight, unknown from many of the institutions in the academy of letters and sciences which should rightfully acknowledge this secretive history.

Along with Coppin State University, which seems uninterested in the relationship the school’s namesake, Fanny Jackson Coppin, had with Dr. Douglass there are other colleges and universities equally dispassionate about doing the requisite research.

Recently, the University of Rochester appropriately honored the work of Mr. Kenneth B. Morris, Jr., a Douglass descendant, humanitarian, scholar and President of the Frederick Douglass Family Initiatives.

After making some inquiries I’ve caught some chatter the University of Rochester is planning to honor Dr. Douglass with an honorary degree or an equivalent honor in coming months.

I kindly advise University of Rochester NOT follow the same tone-deaf path Washington College took honoring Dr. Douglass and failing to address his longstanding relationship with higher education.

This is a polite word that for W Street Douglassonians it matters not Yale, Harvard, Maryland State Archives, Maryland Historical Society, Washington College or University of Rochester. The era of playtime honorifics for Dr. Douglass is over. Speak on it and let it be known for the entire world to know.

Frederick Augustus Washington (Bailey) Douglass is Professor Emeritus, the Master Educator of an entire Nation and local Tribe whose presence in the pages and chapters of this country’s history textbooks and manuscripts remains unwritten. From the afterlife his spirit speaks through his words studied in college curriculum from coast to coast.

Dr. Douglass was a fugitive slave-scholar who made his self-taught intellect known the world over before he was thirty years old. Thusly he parlayed and built with leading radical intellectuals and educators the world over the rest of his life.

Honor the work Dr. Douglass did at university as a scholar of the runaway slave.

Honor the Pharoah of American Letters.

Dr. Douglass and Prof. John H. Raymond

Dr. Douglass made his home in Rochester from 1847 until 1872. During this time he cultivated relationships with religious leaders, journalists, temperance advocates, businessmen, local politicians, the black community, suffragists and educators from the local public school system to the University of Rochester.

To my knowledge, no modern biography, book chapter, monograph or journal article has explored the details and specifics of Dr. Douglass and the University of Rochester.

Here’s to a start:

Washington City

October 18, 1880.

Image result for john h raymond vassar college

John H. Raymond served as President of Vassar College from 1864 until his death in 1878.

I am glad to know that it is your purpose to publish the life and letters of your father, the late John H. Raymond. Unhappily for me, I have no letters of his which can be of service to you. I knew him well while he was a Professor in Rochester University. It was at a critical and trying time in the history of the struggle between freedom and slavery in our country. The fugitive-slave bill had just been enacted, making the whole North slave-hunting ground and every American citizen a slave-hunter, and had but lately become a law.

The effort to make that law respectable was immense. Press, pulpit, and official position all clamored for its enforcement. To speak and write against that law was to brand one’s self in public estimation as a law-breaker, and such a law-breaker I confess myself to have been both in theory and practice, for I assisted as many as I could in their escape from slavery, and no man in Rochester more than your father cheerfully gave me countenance and support in my efforts to secure a safe- conduct of the many fugitives from slavery who came through that city on their way to Canada. He freely gave his time, his influence, and his voice on the side of  humanity. No so-called law, interest, or logic could blind him to the stupendous wickedness of slavery, and he had the courage to be known and read of all men in that dark hour of our history as an inflexible friend to the cause of emancipation. Many have been the words of kindness and consolation which he addressed to me when the way seemed dark and difficult, and I retain a vivid recollection of his benevolent face and his amiable manners and bearing, though it is more than a quarter of a century since I saw him. . . .

Believe me sincerely yours,

Frederick Douglass.

SOURCE:

Will be shared when institutions of higher learning get as serious, believe you me, as I am about Dr. Douglass and higher education.

, , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

Frederick Douglass in Athens, Greece as recalled by Lucinda Hinsdale Stone

Image result for Lucinda Hinsdale Stone: her life story and reminiscence google books

Lucinda Hinsdale Stone

In our continuing series honoring Women’s History Month, I share a brief anecdote of Frederick Douglass in Athens, Greece as told by his friend, educator Lucinda Hinsdale Stone.

Mr. Fearne, of Mississippi, was then the American ambassador at Athens, and Frederick Douglass and wife were also at the Mediterranean Hotel and seated at the table with Captain Dewey and our American party. Mr. Fearne gave a great reception to Doctor Schliemann on his return from Egypt, to which Americans were particularly invited, but from which Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Douglass were excluded on account of his color, though Frederick was a greater man than Mr. Fearne, endowed by God with greater gifts and soul-riches.

But in a few days Dr. Schliemann gave a greater party than our ambassador had done, on his own account, to which he invited Frederick Douglass and his wife as especially honored guests and to which, I recollect, Captain Dewey and his lieutenant were invited to assist Dr. Schliemann in receiving.

Frederick Douglass was no darker in color than Socrates, Pericles, Phidias, and a host of noble Greeks, whose pictures hung in multitudes on the walls of Doctor Schliemann’s palace, and whose statues and busts adorned by dozens its roof – which was a pedestal for the statue of many a noble Greek.

Heinrich Schliemann (HeidICON 28763) (cropped).jpg

Heinrich Schliemann

Doctor Schliemann’s house in Athens was called “Ilion Melathron” (the Troy Cottage), though a marble palace rather than a cottage, and they were very hospitable in the use of it for the entertainment of strangers. The roof commands a wonderful view of the Acropolis and many of the classic hills about Athens. He kindly asked us into his library and working-room, the treasures in which would be as much “Greek” to us moderns as Shakespeare makes Ciceros’ speech to the Roman rabble of his day; but they were such as his course of life made necessary and familiar and most valuable to him. Doctor Schliemann has studied, thought, and lived Homer so long that neither the poet nor his characters were myths to him, but daily companions.

The next morning after the Fearne slight I went to the room of Frederick Douglass and wife to ask them to accompany our little party on a drive over to Plato’s garden. He was very pale, for the Fearne slight had pierced him. He was not wholly insensible to such things; but soon, in company with Plato, Socrates, and other great Greeks whom imagination brought around him, he quite forgot the Mississippi minister’s slight, and was himself again.

Image result for athens greece acropolisIn our drive around Athens we visited not only Plato’s garden, but the prison where Socrates drank the hemlock. It seemed to me almost odorous that day with the contents of his fatal cup, but the place was wonderfully reviving to Mr. Douglass. We all felt inspired by that drive, and with the contact of so many things reminding us of the great men of past times.

SOURCE:

Lucinda Hinsdale Stone: Her Life Story and Reminiscence. (1902)

, , , , ,

Leave a comment

Frederick Douglass to Wilbur Siebert about his involvement with the Underground Railroad (March, 1893)

March 27, 1893.

Mr. W. H. Siebert,
Columbus, Ohio.

Dear Sir:

My connection with the Underground Railroad began long before I left the South (1838) and was continued as long as slavery continued, whether I lived in New Bedford, Lynn, or Rochester, N.Y. In the latter place I had as as many as eleven fugitive under my roof at one time.

The route from slavery to freedom, for most of the fugitives, was through Philadelphia, New York, Albany, Syracuse, Rochester, and thence to Canada, These fugitives were received in Philadelphia by William Still, by him sent to New York where they were cared for my Mr. David Ruggles and afterwards by Mr. Gibbs also of New York, thence to Stephen Myers at Albany; then to J. W. Loguen, Syracuse; thence to Frederick Douglass, Rochester, and thence to Hiram Wilson, St. Catherines, Canada, West.

Mr. Still has written a book called the Underground Railroad, but because I, in my power, permitted a criticism of his conduct in taking from the fugitives who passed through his hands, what was thought was wrong, I see that he has omitted to mention my name in his books, as one of the Conductors on the Underground Railroad.

Very truly yours,

Frederick Douglass.

SOURCE:

Frederick Douglass to Wilbur Siebert, March 27, 1893. OHIO Memory Siebert Collection: Frederick Douglass.

Siebert, Wilbur Henry. The Underground Railroad from Slavery to Freedom (1898).

Still, William. The Underground Railroad: A Record of Facts, Authentic Narratives, Letters, &c., Narrating the Hardships, Hair-breadth Escapes, and Death Struggles of the Slaves in Their Efforts for Freedom, as Related by Themselves and Others Or Witnessed by the Author : Together with Sketches of Some of the Largest Stockholders and Most Liberal Aiders and Advisers of the Road. (1872) 

, , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

Small biographical entry on Douglass biographer; Frederick May Holland

FD In DCPL library catalog _ Frederic May HollandMany folks claim to be Frederick Douglass scholars but fewer have ever published a single sentence about his life and times in so much as a local newspaper and lesser have ever published a book or monograph of original research.

We all know FD wrote his own autobiography about 3.5 times. In modern times Robert S. Levine at University of Maryland and a couple others have written about FD’s writing of himself. That is not the scholarship I particularly care for. May it be under the genre of literary criticism, but I prefer literary history because FD ran with many writers, journalists, poets and authors.

During his own lifetime FD had two biographers, James Monroe Gregory, a professor at Howard University FD knew well, and the seemingly “elusive” Frederick May Holland.

Recently came across this small entry for Holland in Charles Dudley Warner’s (a neighbor of Mark Twain in Hartford, Conn.) Library of the World’s Best Literature: Biographical Dictionary

Holland, Frederick May. An American Unitarian divine and miscellaneous writer; born at Boston, 1836. He has written: “The Reign of the Stoics” (1879), giving their history, religion, maxims, etc. ‘Stories from Browning” (1882); “Life of Frederick Douglass” ; “Rise of Intellectual Liberty from Thales to Copernicus,” ; etc.

 

, ,

Leave a comment

Lewis H. Douglass profiled in William Wells Brown’s 1874, “The Rising Son: Or, The Antecedents and Advancement of the Colored Race”

Courtesy of National Park Service

Courtesy of National Park Service

LEWIS H. DOUGLASS

The senior editor of the “New National Era” is the eldest son of Frederick Douglass, and inherits a large share of the father’s abilities. He was born in Massachusetts, has a liberal education, is a practical printer, received excellent training in the office of “The North Star,” at Rochester, New York, and is well calculated to conduct a newspaper. Mr. Douglass distinguished himself at the attack on Fort Wagner, where the lamented Colonel Robert G. Shaw fell. His being the first to ascend the defences surrounding the fort, and his exclamation of “Come, boys, we’ll fight for God and Governor Andrew,” was a the time commented upon by the press of Europe as well as of our own country.

Mr. Douglass is an active, energetic man, deeply alive to every interest of his race, uncompromising in his adherence to principle, and is a valuable citizen in any community. He has held several important positions in Washington, where his influence is great. He is a good writer, well informed, and interesting in conversation. In asserting his rights against the pr0scriptive combinations of the printers of Washington, Mr. Douglass was more than a match or his would-be superiors. As a citizen, he is highly respected, and is regarded as one of the leading men of the district. He is of medium size, a little darker in complexion than his father, has a manly walk, gentlemanly in his manners, intellectual countenance, and reliable in his business dealings. His paper, the “New National Era,” is well conducted, and should received the patronage of our people throughout the country.

Source:

Brown, William Wells. The Rising Son: Or, The Antecedents and Advancement of the Colored Race. A.G. Brown & Company, 1874, p. 543 – 544.

, , , ,

Leave a comment