Posts Tagged 1889

VIDEO – Downtown St. Augustine, Florida – Frederick Douglass plaque (1889)


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“Lost History of Caroline County’s First Graduate of Howard University” @ Greensboro Historical Society; Friday, April 9, 2021; 6:30 PM – 8:00 PM


Lost History Associates, in partnership with the Greensboro Historical Society, present, “From the Choptank to Washington City: The Lost History of Caroline County’s First Graduate of Howard University


Friday, April 9, 2021 l 6:30 PM – 8:00 PM 

Greensboro Historical Society 

104 East Sunset Avenue

Greensboro, Maryland 21639


Established in the nation’s capital in 1867, Howard University was founded as an integrated and co-ed institution of higher learning supported by Tuckahoe native Frederick (Bailey) Douglass, who served on the Board of Trustees from 1871 until his passing in 1895. During his quarter-century of service to the university, Douglass welcomed and supported students from all over the country, including those from familiar families of his native Eastern Shore.

Join the Greensboro Historical Society for a groundbreaking presentation and discussion on the ongoing research into the life and times of Greensboro native Dennis F. Groce (Class of 1889), Caroline County’s first graduate of Howard University in Washington, D.C., 

Question and answer will follow the presentation. 


** Featured Presenters **

John Muller, author of Frederick Douglass in Washington, D.C.: The Lion of Anacostia (2012) and Mark Twain in Washington, D.C.: The Adventures of a Capital Correspondent (2013), has presented widely throughout the DC-Baltimore metropolitan area and Eastern Shore. Muller has been featured on C-SPAN’s BookTV and C-SPAN’s American History TV, in the pages of the Washington Post and Star Democrat, airwaves of NBC4 (Washington) and WBAL (Baltimore) and radio stations WPFW (Washington), WAMU (Washington), WYPR (Baltimore), WEAA (Baltimore) and Delmarva Public Radio (Eastern Shore). For the past decade Muller has contributed hundreds of articles to local and national print and online news sources, including the Washington Informer. Muller is a co-founder of Lost History Associates. 

Justin McNeil, an IT professional who has serviced government agencies, nonprofits, corporations and small-businesses within the DC-Baltimore metropolitan areas and Delmarva Peninsula for the last decade, is a doting husband and father of 3, street historian, essayist, and playwright. McNeil has been featured in the pages of the Washington Post, contributed columns to the Washington Informer and been interviewed on News Channel 8 (Washington), WBAL (Baltimore) and WPFW (Washington) and WEAA (Baltimore). McNeil attended Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia and is a co-founder of Lost History Associates. 

For more information on Lost History Associates visit www.losthistoryusa.com 


Note on Reservations and the Greensboro Historical Society 

Attendance and/or reservations are limited to 30 attendees. Seating will be accommodated on a first-come, first-serve basis. 

To reserve a ticket please contact Mr. Chad Dean, via email charlesdean3vzw@gmail.com, or Mary Riddleberger, via phone (410) 482-8903.

There will be a minimal charge at the door and/or suggested donation to support ongoing programs and operations of the Greensboro Historical Society. 

For more information about the Greensboro Historical Society visit and “Like” their Facebook page: www.facebook.com/GreensboroHistoricalSociety

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Congratulations Letter from Dr. Frederick (Bailey) Douglass to new Howard University President, Rev. Jeremiah Rankin [December 7, 1889]

Port Au Prince, Dec. 7, 1889.

MY DEAR DR. RANKIN: – I congratulate you on your election to the President of Howard University; but have far greater reason to congratulate the University.

You have taken upon you a great labor of love and have made a great sacrifice. It is like you. You could have easily found many positions, with less exacting, and in many respects, more agreeable conditions. Your talents, I might say your character and genius, would open doors on golden hinges before you, but you have chosen a place, though high, yet among the lowly. May heaven bless you, in, and for the choice you have made. Your heart, how should I not know it? is with my poor, persecuted and struggling people, and no man in my range of acquaintances has larger of more helpful powers.

You cannot only teach the letter, but the spirit of Christianity, so much needed in the Capital of our great Republic. I have never become reconciled to your absence from Washington. You had a fixed position among the moral and religious forces of the city, and were a terror to evil-doers. Your trumpet gave no uncertain sound. It was never your misfortune to be misunderstood. Your language was never made to conceal your thought. You said what you meant, and meant what you said. Trimmers took no stock in you. Hence, the true friends of Temperance and of Freedom deeply regretted the day that saw you depart, and are glad that you have returned.

I am glad that there was courage enough in the Trustee Board to call you. I have had some thought of resigning, because of absence from the country, but I am reluctant to do so, especially since you are President of the University.

I should like to continue with the institution to the end.

SOURCE:

“Editorial Notes.” ‘President Rankin’s Work …’

Our Day, November – December, 1894. No. 78, p. 583.

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