Archive for March, 2021

“Lost History of Caroline County’s First Graduate of Howard University” @ Greensboro Historical Society; Friday, April 9, 2021; 6:30 PM – 8:00 PM


Lost History Associates, in partnership with the Greensboro Historical Society, present, “From the Choptank to Washington City: The Lost History of Caroline County’s First Graduate of Howard University


Friday, April 9, 2021 l 6:30 PM – 8:00 PM 

Greensboro Historical Society 

104 East Sunset Avenue

Greensboro, Maryland 21639


Established in the nation’s capital in 1867, Howard University was founded as an integrated and co-ed institution of higher learning supported by Tuckahoe native Frederick (Bailey) Douglass, who served on the Board of Trustees from 1871 until his passing in 1895. During his quarter-century of service to the university, Douglass welcomed and supported students from all over the country, including those from familiar families of his native Eastern Shore.

Join the Greensboro Historical Society for a groundbreaking presentation and discussion on the ongoing research into the life and times of Greensboro native Dennis F. Groce (Class of 1889), Caroline County’s first graduate of Howard University in Washington, D.C., 

Question and answer will follow the presentation. 


** Featured Presenters **

John Muller, author of Frederick Douglass in Washington, D.C.: The Lion of Anacostia (2012) and Mark Twain in Washington, D.C.: The Adventures of a Capital Correspondent (2013), has presented widely throughout the DC-Baltimore metropolitan area and Eastern Shore. Muller has been featured on C-SPAN’s BookTV and C-SPAN’s American History TV, in the pages of the Washington Post and Star Democrat, airwaves of NBC4 (Washington) and WBAL (Baltimore) and radio stations WPFW (Washington), WAMU (Washington), WYPR (Baltimore), WEAA (Baltimore) and Delmarva Public Radio (Eastern Shore). For the past decade Muller has contributed hundreds of articles to local and national print and online news sources, including the Washington Informer. Muller is a co-founder of Lost History Associates. 

Justin McNeil, an IT professional who has serviced government agencies, nonprofits, corporations and small-businesses within the DC-Baltimore metropolitan areas and Delmarva Peninsula for the last decade, is a doting husband and father of 3, street historian, essayist, and playwright. McNeil has been featured in the pages of the Washington Post, contributed columns to the Washington Informer and been interviewed on News Channel 8 (Washington), WBAL (Baltimore) and WPFW (Washington) and WEAA (Baltimore). McNeil attended Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia and is a co-founder of Lost History Associates. 

For more information on Lost History Associates visit www.losthistoryusa.com 


Note on Reservations and the Greensboro Historical Society 

Attendance and/or reservations are limited to 30 attendees. Seating will be accommodated on a first-come, first-serve basis. 

To reserve a ticket please contact Mr. Chad Dean, via email charlesdean3vzw@gmail.com, or Mary Riddleberger, via phone (410) 482-8903.

There will be a minimal charge at the door and/or suggested donation to support ongoing programs and operations of the Greensboro Historical Society. 

For more information about the Greensboro Historical Society visit and “Like” their Facebook page: www.facebook.com/GreensboroHistoricalSociety

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Video: “The Third Moment of the Sun: Black Elders and Generational Politics in Early America” by Morehouse College Professor


In this presentation, Professor Frederick Knight (Morehouse College) uses generation as a category of analysis to interpret early African-American history. He shows how age was tied to labor and production in the early African-American experience; how elders shaped early African-American culture; how tensions, conflicts, and bridges arose between different generations of African-Americans; and how people used age to advance particular interests. Drawing on written, visual, and audio materials from a wide range of sources, Professor Knight argues that age mattered to black people in early America.


Editor’s Note:

Frederick (Bailey) Douglass was raised, encouraged and mentored by elders. Throughout his public and private life he recognized these elders within his family and his community.

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VIDEO: Delmarva Today -> Linda Duyer speaks about her book, “‘Round the Pond, Georgetown of Salisbury, Maryland”


The Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History and Culture at Salisbury University recently uploaded a large inventory of backlogged videos, including a 2014 interview by Delmarva Today’s Don Rush with local historian, newspaper columnist, and author Honorable Linda Duyer.

We thank the Nabb Center for sharing the interview with our late friend and keeping alive the legacy of community history of the Delmarva and those who have made lasting contributions.

The Georgetown neighborhood of Salisbury, the focus of Ms. Duyer’s 2009 book, and its extant John Wesley Methodist Episcopal Church was the impetus for the February 1880 visit of Frederick Douglass to Wicomico County.

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Women’s History Month: Principal Ida Marshall; The Lost History of a Maryland Freedmen’s Bureau Teacher

Principal Ida S. Marshall served several schools in several descendant communities in Maryland.

If you can hear me, clap once. If you can hear me, clap twice.

If you understand the depth of this lost history clap thrice.

In honor of Women’s History Month we take a moment or two to recognize the radical, fearless and tireless educators that worked alongside and within the reformist networks and circles of influence from the bottom of the map to up top.

More than two years ago we told you about Rev. Henry Augustus Monroe, a member of the drum corps of the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Regiment who after the War deployed as a teenager to the Potatoe Neck of Somerset County to teach school with the Freedmen’s Bureau.

Today, we share with you an associate of Rev. Monroe’s who similarly came from up top in New England to work below the Mason Dixon Line for the educational and civic improvement of descendant communities throughout the state of Maryland.

Leading Freedmen Bureau affiliated classrooms and school houses in Harford, Kent and Howard counties, Principal Ida Marshal has apparently been overlooked and unrecognized by various private historical and educational organizations, institutions of higher learning and state-sponsored history and heritage agencies. Records indicate Marshall also taught in Delaware, areas of the American South, and in the mid 1870s returned to Maryland to teach in Howard County.

Within the philanthropic and educational networks of “colored” primary schools preparing students to attend institutions of higher learning within the regions of Baltimore, Philadelphia and Washington City, Principal Marshall, Rev. Monroe and Frederick Douglass are all closely connected.

For those that care to know, learn, and discuss the history with a fidelity to the integrity of the community give yourselves a clap or two.

This post is in recognition of Honorable Mrs. Merrion, formerly of Rosa Parks Middle School, and all legendary teachers who have ever taught. Your students do not forget.


Bibliographic Note:

Image of Principal Marshall, page 50 of Schooling the Freed PeopleTeaching, Learning, and the Struggle for Black Freedom, 1861-1876 (UNC Press, 2010)


Below are two images indicating Principal Marshall with the Freedmen’s Bureau School in Elk Ridge Landing in Howard County, Maryland.

United States, Freedmen’s Bureau, Records of the Superintendent of Education and of the Division of Education, 1865-1872


United States, Freedmen’s Bureau, Records of the Superintendent of Education and of the Division of Education, 1865-1872

 

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