Archive for June, 2020

In memory of Elijah McClain (1996 – 2019), a Douglassonian violinist

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Washington Post: “Lincoln statue sparks arguments. Protesters decry the image as racist; others defend its history.” (A10; Sat., June 27, 2020)

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Nathan Richardson as Frederick Douglass cools the tensions of a volatile crowd. 


Lincoln statue sparks arguments. Protesters decry the image as racist; others defend its history.”
The Washington Post
By Clarence Williams & Hannah Natanson
Saturday, June 27, 2020
A10

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The streets are saying Frederick Douglass saved the Freedmen’s Monument in Lincoln Park … VIDEO (Nathan Richardson as Mr. Douglass; Friday, June 26, 2020)

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“As the sun set, the capital’s only memorial to the Proclamation still stood.” John O’Brien; President of the Lincoln Group of the District of Columbia (June 26, 2020)

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Nathan Richardson as Frederick Douglass speaks in Washington City’s Lincoln Park; June 26, 2020. Photo by John O’Brien; Lincoln Group of the District of Columbia.


A most remarkable event Friday at the Emancipation Memorial in Lincoln Park. A community conversation and history event had been scheduled. A protest event on Thursday was moved to Friday.

This confluence of groups got a spirited start when the protest leaders spoke first. Demands that the couching Black man image beside Lincoln was beyond redemption and had to be destroyed.

Further, a recitation of revisionist history declared Lincoln had nothing to do with improving conditions for Black people, and was also beyond redemption. Several older African American folks presented arguments in favor of preserving the statue for historical memory.

A group that portrays renowned women in period costume (FREED) gave compelling presentations on historical context.

Then Frederick Douglass himself took the stage before a decidedly volatile crowd.

He again delivered the speech made at the statue’s dedication in 1876.

He described Lincoln as Douglass knew him, defects and all. But he also gave Lincoln full credit for doing what no one else was capable, when he delivered the greatest act of social justice in our history; the Emancipation Proclamation.

The audience was enthralled.

Douglass (Nathan Richardson) persisted through occasional rants, to complete the speech and to answer questions in the way Douglass would have.

In all, a remarkable day of listening to concerns while learning from well-presented history. Passions were largely cooled.

As the sun set, the capital’s only memorial to the Proclamation still stood. The conversation continues.

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Freedmen’s Monument in Washington City’s Lincoln Park; June 26, 2020. Photo by John O’Brien; Lincoln Group of the District of Columbia.

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Frederick Douglass in Lincoln Park: Community History Rally (Fri., June 26, 2020 @ 6:00 PM)

Lincoln Park - flyer


In a demonstration of solidarity and recognition of the history of Lincoln Park in Washington, D.C. members of the local, regional and national Douglassonian communities are called to assemble on short notice for an emergency teach-in on the evening of Friday, June 26, 2020

Local poet brings Frederick Douglass to life - Daily Press

Nathan Richardson as Hon. Frederick Douglass

Nathan Richardson will present his internationally known reenactment of Honorable Frederick Douglass with excerpts from select speeches, including the remarks of Frederick Douglass on President Abraham Lincoln. Mr. Douglass will hold a post-performance discussion.

Support commentary will be presented by John O’Brien, President of the Lincoln Group of the District of Columbia, John Muller, author of Frederick Douglass in Washington, D.C.: The Lion of Anacostia, and several others.

Members of local, national, regional and international organizations have been invited and are expected to speak; all speakers are welcome, including students and seniors.

The history of Frederick Douglass & Abraham Lincoln will be shared, including the meetings of Douglass and Lincoln in 1863 and 1864 in the White House, their interaction in March 1865 during President Lincoln’s second inauguration, stories of the friendship of Frederick Douglass and Elizabeth Keckley, excerpts of Frederick Douglass 1876 speech, and the friendship of Frederick Douglass and Robert Todd Lincoln.

Local student-Douglassonians will be serving as history ambassadors. Musical performances are waiting to be confirmed as well as participation of honor guards.

Invitations to attend have been extended to Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton, DC Mayor Muriel Bower, Douglassonians members of the United States Senate, United States House of Representatives and several other public officials.

More details forthcoming as they become available.

All CDC and DC DOH guidelines will be followed

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VIDEO: Dave Chappelle mentions Frederick Douglass & his great-grandfather African Methodist Episcopal Bishop William Dave Chappelle in “8:46.” “I know all these songs. I was raised on these songs.”

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6th United States Colored Troops Drum Corps (Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall & Museum)


The 6th USCT Drum Corps plays to open Soldiers & Sailors 3rd Annual African American Heritage Celebration, 2013.

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“Hon. Frederick (Bailey) Douglass & Methodist Camp Meetings on the Tuckahoe: The Sacred Lost History of Frederick Douglass on Maryland’s Eastern Shore. Cambridge, Centreville, Chestertown, Denton, Easton, Elkton, Hillsboro, Oxford, Port Deposit, Perryville, Princess Anne, Queenstown, Ridgely, Rising Sun, Salisbury, St. Michaels, Wye House” (Fair Use – Civil War Trail sign draft;) All research, content and lost history property of Old Anacostia Douglassonians.

Flyer - Fortune & Douglass _ draft (36)


Fair use is any copying of copyrighted material done for a limited and “transformative” purpose, such as to comment upon, criticize, or parody a copyrighted. This is fair use of the template of Civil War Trails, Inc.

Professionalism is paramount. We can no longer dither on the sacred and lost history.

As Richard Sherman told Michael Crabtree, “Don’t you ever talk about me and my research.” And I won’t name names but I will.

Don’t you ever talk about me and my research. Ever.

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“United States Marshal Hon. Frederick (Bailey) Douglass in Appalachian Maryland: Lost History of Frederick Douglass in the Heart of the Civil War Heritage Area” (Fair Use – Civil War Trail sign draft;) All research, content and lost history property of Old Anacostia Douglassonians.

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Fair use is any copying of copyrighted material done for a limited and “transformative” purpose, such as to comment upon, criticize, or parody a copyrighted. This is fair use of the template of Civil War Trails, Inc.

Professionalism is paramount. We can no longer dither on the sacred and lost history.

As Richard Sherman told Michael Crabtree, “Don’t you ever talk about me and my research.” And I won’t name names but I will.

Don’t you ever talk about me and my research. Ever.

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Leave a comment

“Massachusetts 54th Drummer Boy to Delmarva Publisher & Preacher to the White House: The Lost History of Rev. H. A. Monroe, Godson of Frederick Douglass” (Fair Use – Civil War Trail sign draft; Waugh Chapel UMC, Cambridge, Maryland; Dorchester County) All research, content and lost history property of Old Anacostia Douglassonians.

Flyer - Fortune & Douglass _ draft (34)


Fair use is any copying of copyrighted material done for a limited and “transformative” purpose, such as to comment upon, criticize, or parody a copyrighted. This is fair use of the template of Civil War Trails, Inc.

Professionalism is paramount. We can no longer dither on the sacred and lost history.

As Richard Sherman told Michael Crabtree, “Don’t you ever talk about me and my research.” And I won’t name names but I will.

Don’t you ever talk about me and my research. Ever.


NOTE:

Dorchester Star; September 17, 2019; Muller returns to Shore to present lost history of Frederick Douglass’ godson

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