New Frederick Douglass books being published in 2018 [March update]

No automatic alt text available.A number of new Douglass books have already been published in the first two months of 2018 and more are expected throughout the year.

Here’s a brief list:

Frederick Douglass: America’s Prophet
D.H. Dilbeck
Pub Date: February 14, 2018

From his enslavement to freedom, Frederick Douglass was one of America’s most extraordinary champions of liberty and equality. Throughout his long life, Douglass was also a man of profound religious conviction. In this concise and original biography, D. H. Dilbeck offers a provocative interpretation of Douglass’s life through the lens of his faith. In an era when the role of religion in public life is as contentious as ever, Dilbeck provides essential new perspective on Douglass’s place in American history.

Douglass came to faith as a teenager among African American Methodists in Baltimore. For the rest of his life, he adhered to a distinctly prophetic Christianity. Imitating the ancient Hebrew prophets and Jesus Christ, Douglass boldly condemned evil and oppression, especially when committed by the powerful. Dilbeck shows how Douglass’s prophetic Christianity provided purpose and unity to his wide-ranging work as an author, editor, orator, and reformer. As “America’s Prophet,” Douglass exposed his nation’s moral failures and hypocrisies in the hopes of creating a more just society. He admonished his fellow Americans to truly abide by the political and religious ideals they professed to hold most dear. Two hundred years after his birth, Douglass’s prophetic voice remains as timely as ever.

The Frederick Douglass Papers: Series Three: Correspondence, Volume 2: 1853-1865
Frederick Douglass (Author)
Pub Date: April 24, 2018

The second collection of meticulously edited correspondence with abolitionist, author, statesman, and former slave Frederick Douglass covers the years leading up to the Civil War through the close of the conflict, offering readers an illuminating portrait of an extraordinary American and the turbulent times in which he lived. An important contribution to historical scholarship, the documents offer fascinating insights into the abolitionist movement during wartime and the author’s relationship to Abraham Lincoln and other prominent figures of the era.

If I Survive: Frederick Douglass and Family in the Walter O. Evans Collection
Celeste-Marie Bernier (Author),‎ Andrew Taylor (Author)
Pub Date: September 1, 2018

  • Over 60 previously unpublished speeches, letters and autobiographies and over 20 photographs and prints (many unseen) of Frederick Douglass and his sons from the Walter O. Evans collection.
  • The first extensive study of Frederick Douglass and his family’s fight for the cause of liberty during the Civil War and in the Post-Emancipation era
    The first scholarly annotated transcriptions of these previously unpublished materials
  • In-depth individual chronologies mapping the life stories of Frederick Douglass and his sons, Lewis Henry, Frederick Jr., and Charles Remond Douglass

This book consists of a 100,000 word research monograph and 60,000 words of original manuscript facsimile pages as accompanied by edited transcriptions and scholarly notes. This volume will benefit the reader by publishing the previously unseen letters, essays, and photographs of Frederick Douglass and his sons, Charles Remond and Lewis Henry Douglass, held in the Walter O. Evans collection. A first for specialist researchers in the fields of US history/ Slavery Studies/ African American Studies/ American Studies/ Transatlantic Studies as well as for general audiences interested in the lives and works of a legendary US historical figure, this scholarly edition will consist of an introduction followed by annotated facsimile reproductions of the writings of Douglass and his sons who not only fought in the Civil War but were civil rights campaigners and political activists. While there were many Frederick Douglasses to fit every era – Douglass the fugitive slave, Douglass the antislavery orator, Douglass the autobiographer, Douglass the statesman, and Douglass the transatlantic reformer – this book breaks new ground by shedding light on Douglass the family man.

Pictures and Power: Imaging and Imagining Frederick Douglass 1818-2018
Edited by Celeste-Marie Bernier and Bill E. Lawson
Pub Date: December 11, 2017

Pictures and Power: Imaging and Imagining Frederick Douglass 1818-2018 is the result of decades of collaborations and conversations among academics, artists, and activists living and working in the UK and the US. For the first time, contributors map Douglass’ eclectic and experimental visual archive across an array of aesthetic, social, political, cultural, historical, ideological, and philosophical contexts. While Douglass the activist, diplomat, statesman, politician, autobiographer, orator, essayist, historian, memoirist, correspondent, and philosopher have been the focus of a scholarly industry over the decades, Douglass the art historian and the subject of photographs, paintings, prints, and sculpture let alone mass visual culture has only begun to be explored. Across this volume, scholars share their groundbreaking research investigating Douglass’ significance as the subject of visual culture and as himself a self-reflexive image-maker and radical theorist. Pictures and Power has come to life from a conviction endorsed by Douglass himself: the battleground against slavery and the fight for equal rights had many staging grounds and was by no means restricted to the plantation, the antislavery podium, the legal court, the stump circuit, the campaign trail, or even the educational institution but rather bled through every arena of imaginative, political and artistic life.

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