Archive for May, 2013

American University: Books That Shaped America Discussion Series – The Narrative Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave [June 4, 2013, 7:30 – 9:00pm]

frdo10995_booknarrativeAmerican University: Books That Shaped America Discussion Series

The Narrative Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave

A community dialogue about slavery in America–the triumph of one man’s emancipation from bondage–led by Professor Thomas Merrill (Assistant Professor, School of Public Affairs)

June 4, 2013, 7:30–9:00pm

Mud Box Cafe
Bender Library, Room B30A
American University

Frederick Douglass’s first autobiography is one of the best-written and most widely read slave narratives. It was boldly published less than seven years after Douglass had escaped and before his freedom purchased. Prefaced by statements of support from his abolitionist friends, William Garrison and Wendell Phillips, Douglass’s book relates his experiences growing up a slave in Maryland and describes the strategies he used to learn to read and write. More than just a personal story of courage, Douglass’s account became a strong testament for the need to abolish slavery.

Please join us for a community dialogue about slavery in America – and the triumph of one man’s emancipation from bondage – informed by the classic book by Frederick Douglass. The discussion will be led by Professor Tom Merrill of the Department of Government. Professor Merrill’s research and teaching interests include political philosophy, especially early modern political philosophy, bioethics, and public policy.

All members of the American University and greater Washington, DC, communities are invited. Attendees do not need to have read the book. Admission is free and reservation is not required.

Light refreshments will be served at all events.

For more information visit: http://www.american.edu/spexs/btsa or contact LibEvents@american.edu202-885-3847

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Library of Congress Books & Beyond – Frederick Douglass in Washington, DC: The Lion of Anacostia [Thurs., June 20, 12 noon, Mary Pickford Theater, 3rd Floor, Madison Building]

History Press

History Press

I am truly humbled by the opportunity to discuss Frederick Douglass in Washington, DC: The Lion of Anacostia at the Library of Congress’ Mary Pickford Theater (3rd Floor, Madison Building) on Thursday, June 20th at 12 Noon.

While the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library’s Adult Literary Resource Center (and Washingtoniana Division) will always be from whence I came, the book could not have been written without the Library of Congress.

LOC holds the Frederick Douglass Papers. With the expertise shared by the world-class staffs of the Law Library, Newspapers & Current Periodical Reading Room, Manuscript Reading Room, and online resources such as Chronicling America and the “Ask a Librarian” service, the book became a reality. On June 20th I’m looking forward taking a moment to further thank the staff of LOC for all of their help. I truly cannot thank them enough.

For more information on the upcoming book talk please contact the Center for the Book at 202.707.5221 or http://www.read.gov/cfb.

 

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Library of Congress Gallery Talk — “Frederick Douglass and the Civil War” [May 29, 2013, noon, Southwest Gallery of the Thomas Jefferson Building]

Library of Congress

Library of Congress

Wednesday, May 29
GALLERY TALK — Adrienne Cannon of the Manuscript Division talks about Frederick Douglass and the Civil War at noon in “The Civil War in America” exhibition, located in the Southwest Gallery of the Thomas Jefferson Building.

Contact: 202.707.9203.

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Norton’s Long-Fought Effort to Bring D.C.’s Frederick Douglass Statue to the Capitol Ends in Victory

Before the Frederick Douglass statue at One Judiciary Square moves to the US Capitol he takes time to read a new book about his life and times in Anacostia. Photo_ John MullerFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                       

May 21, 2013

Norton’s Long-Fought Effort to Bring D.C.’s Frederick Douglass Statue to the Capitol Ends in Victory

WASHINGTON, DC – The House today passed a resolution (S.Con.Res.16) authorizing the use of Emancipation Hall next month,Wednesday, June 19, 2013, to unveil the District of Columbia’s Frederick Douglass statue.  The resolution, which passed the Senate last week, was approved in the House by a voice vote and does not need to be signed into law to take effect, marking the final step in the long-fought effort of Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC) to allow the District, like the states, to have its own statue in the Capitol.  During House consideration of the resolution today, Norton spoke and thanked the Republican leadership and Representative Candice Miller (R-MI), chair of the Committee on House Administration, for her help in bringing the resolution to the floor and Ranking Member Robert Brady (D-PA) for his longstanding commitment to placing a D.C. statue in the Capitol.

“Today, after years of work, our city receives closure that residents will be represented in the Capitol with a statue, like each of the 50 states,” said Norton.  “Next month, on June 19, we will celebrate this long-sought symbol of our American citizenship.  There is no better figure to represent our city than Frederick Douglass, who made the city his home and was deeply involved in D.C. government and in the civic affairs of the city.  Douglass is not only one of the great international icons of human rights, he is remembered in the District also for his outspoken dedication to democratic self-government and congressional representation for the city.”

Norton found a number of allies in the House and Senate to help the District get its own statue in the Capitol.  Last Congress, Senator Charles Schumer (D-NY), chairman of the Rules and Administration Committee, sponsored a stand-alone bill authorizing the move of the Douglass statue to the Capitol.  The House companion to Schumer’s bill, sponsored by former Representative Dan Lungren (R-CA), then-chairman of the Committee on House Administration, and co-sponsored by Norton, was signed into law by President Obama on September 20, 2012.  Senate Majority Whip Dick Durbin (D-IL), then-chairman of the Appropriations Subcommittee on Financial Services and General Government, earlier had included a provision in the fiscal year 2013 appropriations bill, approved by the full committee, authorizing the move of the Douglass statue, but the bill was not considered on the Senate floor.

The Douglass statue will be only the fourth statue or bust in the Capitol that honors an African American.

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 www.norton.house.gov

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Walter Dean Myers keeps the spirit and legacy of Frederick Douglass alive

Walter Dean Myers John Muller at the 2013 Gaithersburg Book Festival. Photo by Gordon Yu.

Walter Dean Myers and John Muller at the 2013 Gaithersburg Book Festival. Photo by Gordon Yu.

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Senate Passes Resolution for Frederick Douglass Statue Unveiling in Emancipation Hall on Wednesday, June 19, 2013

Before the Frederick Douglass statue at One Judiciary Square moves to the US Capitol he takes time to read a new book about his life and times in Anacostia. Photo_ John Muller

WASHINGTON, DC – Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC) thanked her colleagues in the Senate for passing a resolution yesterday authorizing the use of Emancipation Hall on Wednesday, June 19, 2013, to unveil the District of Columbia’s Frederick Douglass statue, marking the first time that the District, like the states, will have its own statue in the Capitol.  The resolution is expected on the House floor soon but does not need to be signed into law in order to take effect.  The Congresswoman particularly expressed her gratitude to Senator Charles Schumer (D-NY), chairman of the Senate Rules and Administration Committee, for sponsoring the bill and to Senate Majority Whip Dick Durbin (D-IL), who jumpstarted the effort to move the statue into the Capitol as chairman of the Appropriations Subcommittee on Financial Services and General Government, which has jurisdiction over D.C., when the subcommittee’s s fiscal year 2013 appropriations bill, approved by the full committee but not considered on the Senate floor, included a provision authorizing the move of the statue into Capitol.  Schumer then sponsored a stand-alone bill authorizing the move and the House companion to Schumer’s bill, sponsored by former Rep. Dan Lungren (R-CA), then-chairman of the Committee on House Administration, and co-sponsored by Norton, was signed into law by President Obama on September 20, 2012.

“Our country has always recognized our residents as American citizens when the country goes to war and in the obligation to pay federal income taxes,” Norton said.  “Because D.C. residents have met every obligation of citizenship, they have tried for years to be represented in the Capitol with a statue, donated by them, like each of the 50 states.  Today, with vital assistance from Senators Schumer and Durbin, the District is close to realizing this long sought symbol of their American citizenship.  Frederick Douglass is one of the great international icons of human rights, but D.C. residents chose his statue to represent our city in the Capitol because of the boundless energy he dedicated to the right of D.C. residents to democratic self-government and congressional representation.  Our residents, who have no elected senators of their own, are deeply indebted to Senators Schumer and Durbin for their generous efforts.”

The Douglass statue will be only the fourth statue or bust in the Capitol that honors an African American.

 

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 www.norton.house.gov

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Frederick Douglass 15-foot wheat paste on Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue SE in Historic Ancostia

Fred Douglass wheat past on lower Martin Luther King Jr Ave SETake a trip down MLK / What a beautiful day / What a beautiful day

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