Family Fun Day at Frederick Douglass House! Sunday, October 19 [11am - 4pm]

DC Family Fund Day _ Oct. 19

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Letter: Frederick Douglass to Charles Devens [May 23, 1881]

Library of Congress

Library of Congress

Officer of the Recorder of Deeds,

District of Columbia

Washington, D.C., May 23d, 1881.

Hon. Charles Devens:

My dear Sir:

I thank you very sincerely for your kind and valued letter of congratulations after my confirmation as Register of Deeds and especially for the good word you were pleased to speak for me to the President of the United States. That word would no doubt have earned my retention in the office of U.S. Marshal, but for the President’s preference for a personal friend. My present office is even better suited to my tastes than the Marshalship and is sufficiently [illegible.] Allow me to express my pleasure that Massachusetts continues to honor you with [illegible] responsible position. I shall look back with satisfaction to the four years I served under you as Marshal and you were Attorney General of the United States.

Very truly yours,

Frederick Douglass

SOURCE:

Frederick Douglass Papers, Library of Congress; 1881, Jan. – Jun. (Series: General Correspondence): Image 39 of 61

 

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Easton, Maryland Celebrates the life and legacy of Frederick Douglass

Posted: Tuesday, September 23, 2014 12:29 pm

EASTON — The Town of Easton and the Frederick Douglass Honor Society will celebrate Frederick Douglass’ life and legacy Saturday, Sept. 27, during Frederick Douglass Day.

The celebration will feature a parade with bands, keynote address by a Douglass scholar, musical performances, children’s activities, food and retail vendors, a tour of “The Hill,” a historically oriented scavenger hunt, oral history interviews and a free screening of “12 Years a Slave.”

Born into slavery in Talbot County, Douglass became an author, human rights activist, teacher and writer. His bronze statue was erected in front of the Talbot County Courthouse on June 18, 2011.

At 10:45 a.m., the Frederick Douglass Day parade will form on Glenwood Avenue, then march to West Street and Federal Street, ending at the statue at about 11:15 a.m. Eric Lowery, president of the Frederick Douglass Honor Society, will welcome attendees, and present musical performances and a reading by the winner of the Frederick Douglass Essay contest.

“Frederick Douglass and African-American history is part of us all,” Lowery said. “We hope the community and visitors will enjoy this incredible day of learning, celebration and entertainment. One of my favorite Douglass quotes is ‘… It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men.’”

Afterward, participants can stroll to the event’s central location on Dover Street, in the parking lot next to the Talbot County District Court building. There will be live entertainment, food and retail vendors, and a knowledge village, where exhibitors from various organizations will share information on their missions and histories.

From 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Dale Green will lead a tour of “The Hill,” an area in Easton recently discovered to be the oldest African-American community in the nation, populated by free blacks and some whites, all living in relative harmony. Green, chairman of the Historic Preservation Program at Morgan State University in Baltimore, has played an active role in archaeological digs in “The Hill” neighborhood. At 3 p.m., he will present an update on “The Hill” and its latest archaeological findings at the Talbot County Free Library.

From 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Dover Street location, Kentavius Jones and his band will perform live music. Other musical performers will include the Bay Country Chorus, Gene Edwards and the SPAA Singers (Society for the Preservation of African American Singers)

At 1 p.m., keynote speaker David Blight, a Yale University historian and director of the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance and Abolition, will talk about material from his forthcoming book on Frederick Douglass’ life at the Talbot County Free Library.

Sanfoka Dance Theater will take center stage at 3 p.m. to present authentic African art in the form of dance music, and folkways.

A free screening of “12 Years a Slave” will be held 6:30 p.m. at Easton Premier Cinemas. The film, based on a true story about one man’s fight for survival and freedom, earned three Academy Awards — Best Picture, Best Supporting Actress for Lupita Nyong’o and Best Adapted Screenplay for John Ridley.

On Friday, Sept. 26, the Frederick Douglass Honor Society will host a fundraising event at the Avalon Theatre, with live music by the XPD’s, who Motown, R&B and funk songs. Tickets are $35 and available online at www.avalontheatre.com.

Except for the fundraiser, all Frederick Douglass Day events and the movie screening are free and open to the public.

For more information, email ericlowery@atlanticbb.net, or call 410-375-7879 or 410-463-5789.

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Java Jolt Lecture: Frederick Douglass & Alexandria [September 20th, 10am]

Courtesy of National Park Service, FDNHS.

Courtesy of National Park Service, FDNHS.

Local historian Jay Roberts will discuss the little known visit Frederick Douglass made to Alexandria on September 24, 1894. Just five months before his death, Douglass – orator, statesmen, influential publisher, social reformer, and champion of civil rights – came to Alexandria. The occasion that brought “the Lion of Anacostia” to Virginia soil was the 31st anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. Learn more about this interesting event, sponsored by the Friends of Alexandria Archaeology (FOAA). Light refreshments

 

  • September 20, 2014 – September 20, 2014
  • Times: 10 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
  • Admission: Free!
  • Venue: Alexandria Archaeology
  • 105 North Union Street, #327
  • Alexandria VA 22314
  • Phone: 703-746-4399

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“The Many Faces of Frederick Douglass,” Dr. Celeste-Marie Bernier, Sept. 19, 2014 [Maryland State House Old House of Delegates Chamber

Many Faces of Frederick Douglass _ Sept_1As an individual who was not only a household name but a household image in the nineteenth century, Frederick Douglass made repeated appearances across countless photographic portraits, engravings, lithographs, paintings and sculpture created by both Black and white
artists. Recognising the racist forces at work in the typically grotesquely caricatured visual incarnations produced by white artists, Douglass remained at war against the intellectual, aesthetic, social, moral and political damage resulting from attempts to commodify and objectify not only his own physicality but the corporeal realities of black women, children and men more generally. This lecture will introduce audiences to Douglass’ lesser and even unknown appearances in fine art and popular images.

Maryland State House
Old House of Delegates Chamber
Friday, September 19, 2014

4:00PM-5:00PM

A Valid ID is required to enter the Maryland State House

For General Questions: 410-260-6487

http://msa.maryland.gov/

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Frederick Douglass took care of “All money orders and letters on business” for launch of The Commoner

The Commoner, Vol. 1, No. 1 _ 10 Sept. 1875 - money orders to FD“ALL money orders and letters on business must be directed to the editor of THE COMMONER, 316 A street northeast, care of Hon. Frederick Douglass, until further notice.”

 

SOURCE:

The Commoner, Vol. 1, No. 1., 10 Sept., 1875, p. 2

 

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“The Commoner,” Vol. 1, No. 1 [September 10, 1875]

The Commoner, Vol. 1, No. 1 _ 10 Sept. 1875For more information on George Washington Williams, check out John Hope Franklin’s book on Williams or watch an interview he gave on Williams.

Chronicling America’s entry for The Commoner.

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