Abandoned Frederick Douglass Community Center on Alabama Avenue SE remains despite “New Ward 8″

WIlliam Alston-El stands by the abandoned Frederick Douglass Community Center on Alabama Avenue SE.

WIlliam Alston-El stands by the abandoned Frederick Douglass Community Center on Alabama Avenue SE.

Douglass and Stanton Dwellings may be long gome but this relic of the past remains.

“This is shameful. Even in plain sight, hundreds of cars and people pass here every day, Fred is forgotten. They give out food in the back to people but don’t even have the decency to pick up their boxes. Well, nothing new. Oh, wait, it’s a new day in Ward 8. Haven’t you heard?” – William Alston-El, November 9, 2014

The legacy of John W. Blassingame has been all but forgotten.

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William Calvin Chase of the Washington Bee writes to Frederick Douglass [Jan. 6, 1888]

Frederick Douglass Papers, Library of Congress

Frederick Douglass Papers, Library of Congress

Immediately drop what you are doing and stop with the “No struggle, no progress,” cliched sloganeering of Frederick Douglass. Study Douglass. Research Douglass. Know who he ran with and knocked heads with. Stop disgracing his lived legacy by reducing his more than half-century worth of grinding to a singular expression much like Dr. King and “I have a Dream…”

Get up on game. Know the public and private battles of “Old Man Eloquent” and William Calvin Chase.

If I hear one more random person say, “As Frederick Douglass said, ‘If there is no struggle, there is no progress.'” I am going to get on my William Calvin Chase and downright act a dignified and intellectual fool up in the place.

SOURCE:

Frederick Douglass Papers, Manuscripts: 1888, Jan. – Feb., Image 5

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Frederick Douglass Endorses The “National Leader” [NL, 19 Jan., 1889, 4]

National Leader, 19 Jan 1889 _ FD endorses National LeaderHon. Frederick Douglass Endorses The “National Leader.”

The Most Staunch Supporter of the Republican Party Now Published in This Country

Cedar Hill, Anacostia, D.C.

November 26, 1888

 

Magnes L. Robinson:

My Dear Sir: – I have read with interesting interest the editorials in the National Leader of late and have no hesitation in pronouncing the Leader as one of the most staunch supporters of the Republican party now published in this country. I do hope you will be able to keep your banner on the outer wall permanently. Do not let us clamor for office, but for rights.

Very Truly Yours,

Fred’K Douglass.

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Masthead of “The Leader” includes Associate Editor Frederick Douglass, Jr. [8 December, 1888]

DC Public Library, Special Collections

DC Public Library, Special Collections

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Family Fun Day at Frederick Douglass House! Sunday, October 19 [11am – 4pm]

DC Family Fund Day _ Oct. 19

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Letter: Frederick Douglass to Charles Devens [May 23, 1881]

Library of Congress

Library of Congress

Officer of the Recorder of Deeds,

District of Columbia

Washington, D.C., May 23d, 1881.

Hon. Charles Devens:

My dear Sir:

I thank you very sincerely for your kind and valued letter of congratulations after my confirmation as Register of Deeds and especially for the good word you were pleased to speak for me to the President of the United States. That word would no doubt have earned my retention in the office of U.S. Marshal, but for the President’s preference for a personal friend. My present office is even better suited to my tastes than the Marshalship and is sufficiently [illegible.] Allow me to express my pleasure that Massachusetts continues to honor you with [illegible] responsible position. I shall look back with satisfaction to the four years I served under you as Marshal and you were Attorney General of the United States.

Very truly yours,

Frederick Douglass

SOURCE:

Frederick Douglass Papers, Library of Congress; 1881, Jan. – Jun. (Series: General Correspondence): Image 39 of 61

 

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Easton, Maryland Celebrates the life and legacy of Frederick Douglass

Posted: Tuesday, September 23, 2014 12:29 pm

EASTON — The Town of Easton and the Frederick Douglass Honor Society will celebrate Frederick Douglass’ life and legacy Saturday, Sept. 27, during Frederick Douglass Day.

The celebration will feature a parade with bands, keynote address by a Douglass scholar, musical performances, children’s activities, food and retail vendors, a tour of “The Hill,” a historically oriented scavenger hunt, oral history interviews and a free screening of “12 Years a Slave.”

Born into slavery in Talbot County, Douglass became an author, human rights activist, teacher and writer. His bronze statue was erected in front of the Talbot County Courthouse on June 18, 2011.

At 10:45 a.m., the Frederick Douglass Day parade will form on Glenwood Avenue, then march to West Street and Federal Street, ending at the statue at about 11:15 a.m. Eric Lowery, president of the Frederick Douglass Honor Society, will welcome attendees, and present musical performances and a reading by the winner of the Frederick Douglass Essay contest.

“Frederick Douglass and African-American history is part of us all,” Lowery said. “We hope the community and visitors will enjoy this incredible day of learning, celebration and entertainment. One of my favorite Douglass quotes is ‘… It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men.’”

Afterward, participants can stroll to the event’s central location on Dover Street, in the parking lot next to the Talbot County District Court building. There will be live entertainment, food and retail vendors, and a knowledge village, where exhibitors from various organizations will share information on their missions and histories.

From 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Dale Green will lead a tour of “The Hill,” an area in Easton recently discovered to be the oldest African-American community in the nation, populated by free blacks and some whites, all living in relative harmony. Green, chairman of the Historic Preservation Program at Morgan State University in Baltimore, has played an active role in archaeological digs in “The Hill” neighborhood. At 3 p.m., he will present an update on “The Hill” and its latest archaeological findings at the Talbot County Free Library.

From 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Dover Street location, Kentavius Jones and his band will perform live music. Other musical performers will include the Bay Country Chorus, Gene Edwards and the SPAA Singers (Society for the Preservation of African American Singers)

At 1 p.m., keynote speaker David Blight, a Yale University historian and director of the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance and Abolition, will talk about material from his forthcoming book on Frederick Douglass’ life at the Talbot County Free Library.

Sanfoka Dance Theater will take center stage at 3 p.m. to present authentic African art in the form of dance music, and folkways.

A free screening of “12 Years a Slave” will be held 6:30 p.m. at Easton Premier Cinemas. The film, based on a true story about one man’s fight for survival and freedom, earned three Academy Awards — Best Picture, Best Supporting Actress for Lupita Nyong’o and Best Adapted Screenplay for John Ridley.

On Friday, Sept. 26, the Frederick Douglass Honor Society will host a fundraising event at the Avalon Theatre, with live music by the XPD’s, who Motown, R&B and funk songs. Tickets are $35 and available online at www.avalontheatre.com.

Except for the fundraiser, all Frederick Douglass Day events and the movie screening are free and open to the public.

For more information, email ericlowery@atlanticbb.net, or call 410-375-7879 or 410-463-5789.

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